Executive Warfare: 10 Rules of Engagement for Winning You... and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 28.18
  • List Price: CDN$ 44.95
  • You Save: CDN$ 16.77 (37%)
Usually ships within 11 to 14 days.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Executive Warfare: 10 Rules of Engagement for Winning Your War for Success Hardcover – Jun 10 2008


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 28.18
CDN$ 26.36 CDN$ 0.46

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill; 1 edition (June 10 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0071544232
  • ISBN-13: 978-0071544238
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 15.9 x 22.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 567 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #382,793 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Robert Morris HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on July 16 2008
Format: Hardcover
With Michele Owens, David D'Alessandro has written another book whose title and subtitle suggest direct correlations between the battlefield and the business world. What sets this book apart from almost all of the others is the fact that he includes no references to Sun Tzu's The Art of War nor to Carl von Clauswitz' On War. I also appreciate the fact that D'Alessandro establishes, develops, and then sustains a direct rapport with his reader. The informal, indeed conversational tone is precisely appropriate and brilliantly sustained. For example: "The single greatest reason why otherwise talented people get stuck in mid-career is because they believe that the same rules that applied for the first part of their careers still apply. They don't. You have to master a much subtler set of rules. You'll need to learn how to acquire the global perspective your peers lack, when and how to deliver bad news, when to take a shot at your rivals and when to be gracious, and, most important, how to handle the many new influences on your [career] trajectory...Intelligence, imagination, and cunning are all required here - but not underhandedness...I don't believe you need to be devious to succeed. In fact, I think being excessively political is a mistake."

D'Alessandro focuses on the adjustments any executive must make as she or he assumes increased responsibilities during an incremental ascension to higher levels of management. His observations and suggestions indicate that he is an empiricist in that he is especially alert to context as well as to significant details, a pragmatist who prefers to focus on what does - and does not - work and has little, if any patience with "woulda/coulda/shoulda," and he has a unique ability to recognize what is most important among whatever options may be available.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 11 reviews
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
How to win a "combat game for grown-ups" July 16 2008
By Robert Morris - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
With Michele Owens, David D'Alessandro has written another book whose title and subtitle suggest direct correlations between the battlefield and the business world. What sets this book apart from almost all of the others is the fact that he includes no references to Sun Tzu's The Art of War nor to Carl von Clauswitz' On War. I also appreciate the fact that D'Alessandro establishes, develops, and then sustains a direct rapport with his reader. The informal, indeed conversational tone is precisely appropriate and brilliantly sustained. For example: "The single greatest reason why otherwise talented people get stuck in mid-career is because they believe that the same rules that applied for the first part of their careers still apply. They don't. You have to master a much subtler set of rules. You'll need to learn how to acquire the global perspective your peers lack, when and how to deliver bad news, when to take a shot at your rivals and when to be gracious, and, most important, how to handle the many new influences on your [career] trajectory...Intelligence, imagination, and cunning are all required here - but not underhandedness...I don't believe you need to be devious to succeed. In fact, I think being excessively political is a mistake."

D'Alessandro focuses on the adjustments any executive must make as she or he assumes increased responsibilities during an incremental ascension to higher levels of management. His observations and suggestions indicate that he is an empiricist in that he is especially alert to context as well as to significant details, a pragmatist who prefers to focus on what does - and does not - work and has little, if any patience with "woulda/coulda/shoulda," and he has a unique ability to recognize what is most important among whatever options may be available. He seems determined to share what he has learned so that his reader will be able to balance impeccable integrity with "street smarts." His advice concerns do's and don'ts of when responding to challenges such as these:

Managing increasing complexity at various stages throughout a "career trajectory"

Excerpt: "It's not just that the pyramid narrows and the competition toughens as you rise. It's that the game changes fundamentally...[and, to repeat] In my experience, the single greatest reason why otherwise talented people get stuck in midcareer is because they believe that the same rules that applied for the first part of their career. They don't. You now have to master a much subtler set of rules."

Dealing with rivals

Excerpt: "It is far better to be a steady incremental player who wins, in the end, by impressing people all along the way than to be the kind of hothead who tries to force a quick culmination." Years ago, someone whose name I do not recall invoked a metaphor to make the same point: "Be a Bunsen burner, not a sparkler."

Building a team

Excerpt: "If you are not picking your own team, you are going to be handed some turkeys. When one of those turkeys screws up, you own the turkey...Having a reputation as somebody who not only can build a strong team but also can bring in people who can build strong teams is extraordinarily valuable...The most valuable employees are those willing to rain on your parade when it's necessary - willing even to rain on a parade they organized themselves."

Earning the trust of direct-reports

Excerpt: "Most of your rivals will treat the people who work for them like children. You can win incredible loyalty simply by treating people like adults who can accept the truth. You will also build a team that way because your key people now all share the same information and can work together to act on it...It's important that your employees see that you are [decisive but] not heartless."

Rising into the senior ranks

Excerpt: "You must become a person of presence." How? "First of all, you have to offer something substantial and not just self-importance. Second, "you have to be true to yourself and the things you believe in." And thirdly, "is perspective - and you cannot develop perspective if your entire life revolves around your job...To get to the top - and stay there - you need to be able to lead human brings. And, the only way to learn how to lead is to live."

I realize that these brief excerpts are taken out of context and that D'Alessandro's key points may seem simplistic. They are offered merely to suggest the thrust of his insights and the flavor of his prose. Moreover, I hasten to add that his observations and suggestions are fully developed within an extended narrative that is both cohesive and comprehensive. Also, although much of his advice concerns challenges that C-level executives face, those who do not as yet occupy a position at that level will nonetheless derive a substantial benefit from understanding those challenges because (a) such understanding will improve their relationships with C-level executives in their own organization, and (b) they can prepare themselves adequately for a time when they most respond to them.

David D'Alessandro begins his book with a disclaimer that also serves as an appropriate conclusion to this review: "If you are not interested in success, put down this book and buy a latte."
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
The Absolute Authority for the Ambitious and Success Oriented July 10 2008
By Abram B - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Executive Warfare provides a valuable insight into what it takes to make it to the top, and ways to survive the onslaughts along the way. The way to the top is filled with pitfalls and dangerous routes, and this book teaches us to avoid or survive them to fight another day. It teaches us which battles are worth fighting and winning to ensure that we win the war.

The key item here is to remember that the rules we know to get to where we are are no longer applicable when we are aiming for the corner office. The same skillsets, aptitudes, and mindsets must now be replaced and re-trained toward the new goal. It's focusing on making sure that we take the right steps, such as:

1. Making a win-win business deal with our bosses along the way.
2. Taking appropriate & calculated risks.
3. Winning enough support from our peers and subordinates.
4. Mastering our behaviors, thoughts, and emotions, since the stakes are now high and our competitors will do anything in their power to win.
5. Knowing our strengths and making sure that we find the right place at the right time to improve our chances to shine the brightest.

As indicated in the introduction of this book, if you are already happy with your current position, then there are other readings available. On the other hand, if you're interested in getting to the next level, and eventually to be the one in charge, this book is a must have.
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
headed for the top July 11 2008
By V wolfe - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I have enjoyed all of D'Alessdandro's books but this offering is surely the best. It's filled with insights into the people who can make or break us as we make we our way through the office jungle. D'Alessandro masterfully turns the office landscape into a chess board and gives you the other side's moves in advance. It's full of LOL tales of careers gone wrong before a single napkin is unfurled at the ubiquitous business lunch and valuable after the game analysis of every situation you've ever encountered and later found yourself left dazed wondering what happened.

D'Alessandro's message isn't that the office is a battlefield to vanquish enemies and conqour the masses. Rather, it's a lesson in being human and undertsanding the complexities and social dynamics of the people you work with and for; as well as the ones you hope to replace.

This book does'nt attepmt to glorify or breed a culture of machiavellian manipulation. Executive Warfare synthesizes and assimilates all of lifes truisms, every thing you've known all along but just didn't understand why it mattered or how to use it in your favor.

Well worth the time especially in today's climate. Knowing the secrets to help you stand out from your peers, demonstrate leadership and add value could be your insurance policy against a pink slip.
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Informed, Practical, And About Half The Total Solution July 15 2008
By Bill Gossett - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I would put this in my top five favorite books for management just behind Hubbard's How to Measure Anything: Finding the Value of "Intangibles" in Business and Taleb's The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable.

D'Alessandro has written a sort of The Art Of War for upper management. Everything I read in his book is something I can directly relate to my own experiences and probably would have been good advice at the time. Executive Warfare is a little touchy-feely after a read like Hubbard's How to Measure Anything: Finding the Value of "Intangibles" in Business, but Hubbard would probably even agree that, at some point, it's not all about measurements and advanced methods. No matter how competent and sophisticated a manager method's are, some issues are about raw survival. While it might seem there are many books on a similar topic, only D'Alessandro seems to capture all the key issues of avoiding corporate exile and the slow death of a manager.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
If you want to rise to the top, read this book July 25 2008
By Mr. Jones - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If you want to rise to the top of your organization, read this book. Many times.

The ideas in this book (if properly executed) are worth $1 million to $100 million (or may be more).

Also recommended: Career Warfare.

I would be happy to pay good money for any work by D'Alessandro and Michele Owens. I hope the next book by the duo is about how to hunt (for business).

In the book David D'Alessandro thanks his father and his father's namesake, which I thought was most interesting.

Product Images from Customers

Search


Feedback