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Exile on Main Street (Vinyl) [Import]

Rolling Stones LP Record
4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (276 customer reviews)

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Before Keith Richards' bad habits took over for a time in the mid-'70s, his work ethic was quite high. Stories abound of the long, if somewhat off-schedule, hours he spent working on this classic album in the basement of his home in France. Hanging together as much because of great songwriting ("Rocks Off," "Soul Survivor") as its fabled grungy atmosphere, Exile caps the Stones' great 1968-'72 run with a force that belies their supposed spiritual tiredness. What some of these songs are about is anybody's guess--Keith claims "Ventilator Blues" was inspired by a grate, while the song plays like an ode to a pistol--but that's just part of this album's hazy game. --Rickey Wright

Product Description

Japanese only SHM pressing. Features 2010 mastering. Universal. 2010.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format:Audio CD
Sandwiched between "Sticky Fingers" and "Goats Head Soup" this album is hard to explain. But why explain it? Just enjoy it.
You get the feeling that the Stones went into the studio and just let it rip. In a way, it can be compared to the Beatles' white album in its eclecticness, but it is much more coherent. While there are different styles, ranging from blues to country to gospel, the record is unified by its uniquely grungy atmosphere. There is a tired, world-weary darkness to the album, "Torn and Frayed," some moments of Tom Waits' rolling-around-in-the-dirt grossness, "Turd on the Run," with moments of shining light, "Let it Loose" and "Shine a Light."
1&2) Rocks Off/Rip This Joint - The album starts with a bang, from the weird, rockin' "Rocks Off" to the Richards gem, "Rip this Joint." You won't find a better Richards tune. Mick's gargling break in the middle of "Rock's Off" mars an otherwise spectacular opening.
3) Shake Your Hips - An eery, murky blues cover. One of the weaker tracks, but it sets the mood for the rest of the album.
4) Casino Boogie - Can't understand most of the words. Keith is particularly nasal on this one. But it introduces the horn section in an upbeat rhythm number.
5) Tumbling Dice - It got radio play, but see how well it fits into the context of this album.
6) Sweet Virginia - A gritty, soulful country number with a memorable scatalogical refrain featuring some great backing vocals. It also features a Tom Waits-ish vocal by Mick.
7) Torn and Frayed - A countrified anthem to exhaustion.
8) Sweet Black Angel - A murky, bluesy ode to a Black pin-up girl. Unfortunately most of the lyrics are indecipherable.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Rolling Stones' Yardstick July 3 2004
Format:Audio CD
If you've gotten this far, it probably safe to say that you know by now that EVERYONE seems to think it is their best ever, of all time, on the desert island, scrounging for gas money because you bought it once more album. And it surely has a pretty good legend surrounding it (south of france, stoned, ripped, twisted..good people). But is it their Best? That all depends.
Me? I like "Sticky Fingers" a little better for one reason: The good songs (Brown Sugar, Can't You Hear me Knockin', Bitch, Sister Morphine) are Transcendant, whereas here the good songs (Tumbling Dice, Shine a Light)Are only "Damned Good". Yes, it's a very fine line, to be sure, but it must be said. And "Fingers" Wins hands down on opening tracks-I mean "Brown Sugar" vs. "Rocks Off"? There's no comparison. Fun Fact: Keith Richards once listed "Brown Sugar" as one of his favorite all-time songs with this justification "Don't YOU think it's a great song?"
That being said, however, "Exile" is the stronger album of the two. The reason? The rest of songs here are neither as bad or as ordinary as the rest of the songs on any other Stones album. Let me put it this way: It's said that any good song will have a sort of "magic" about it. Well, here most every song has that kind of magic in varying amounts. Put on any single song (with the exception of "Turd on the Run", which just doesn't have the magic) and you will end up liking that song on its own merits. It may not be a religious experience, but you will want to hear that song again. It's that kind of album. The same cannot be said for any other Stones Album in their catalogue, and all but the precious few other jewels in the rest of the history of Pop Music.
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5.0 out of 5 stars One of the greatest albums ever June 21 2004
Format:Audio CD
The Rolling Stones' second album to be released on their own label fittingly called Rolling Stones Records, which was distributed by Atlantic at the time, was released in May of 1972. The album was the band's only double studio album but one of the best which ranks up there with The Wall, Quadrophenia, The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway and Tommy among others. Before guitarist Keith Richards' heroin addiction took over for some time in the mid-1970s, he was what the late producer Jimmy Miller called a workhorse. The album was recorded at Keith's home in France and at Olympic Studios in London and Muscle Shoals in Alabama. Keith's music and frontman Mick Jagger's lyric writing was arguably at its peak on Exile. Songs like the opening Rocks Off, Rip This Joint, Tumbling Dice, Sweet Virginia, Keith's classic Happy, Soul Survivor, All Down the Line and Shine a Light are classics which sound like they could have been recorded yeaterday. Ventilator Blues was another highlight as it was the only song that Mick and Keith wrote was co-written by guitarist Mick Taylor whom kicked ass from 1969-74. Exile was the band's second consecutive #1 album and another million seller. The tour in support of the album saw the band getting bigger and bigger. This album is hugely recommended!
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5.0 out of 5 stars The last classic in Stones' finest period May 29 2004
Format:Audio CD
The Rolling Stones' second album to be released on their own label fittingly called Rolling Stones Records, which was distributed by Atlantic at the time, was released in May of 1972. The album was the band's only double studio album but one of the best which ranks up there with The Wall, Quadrophenia, The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway and Tommy among others. Before guitarist Keith Richards' heroin addiction took over for some time in the mid-1970s, he was what the late producer Jimmy Miller called a workhorse. The album was recorded at Keith's home in France and at Olympic Studios in London and Muscle Shoals in Alabama. Keith's music and frontman Mick Jagger's lyric writing was arguably at its peak on Exile. Songs like the opening Rocks Off, Rip This Joint, Tumbling Dice, Sweet Virginia, Keith's classic Happy, Soul Survivor, All Down the Line and Shine a Light are classics which sound like they could have been recorded yeaterday. Ventilator Blues was another highlight as it was the only song that Mick and Keith wrote was co-written by guitarist Mick Taylor whom kicked ass from 1969-74. Exile was the band's second consecutive #1 album and another million seller. The tour in support of the album saw the band getting bigger and bigger. This album is hugely recommended!
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Most recent customer reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
Bought this to see what the hype was all about and am really enjoying it
Published 2 months ago by K. Munro
5.0 out of 5 stars great classic album!
I love this record as it shows the Rolling Stones at their creative best, from classic rockers to gospel tinged anthems and a little bit of "countrification" thrown in for... Read more
Published 4 months ago by InvictaGuy66
2.0 out of 5 stars Over compressed...
Don't like the sound quality of this at all. Sound is muddy and one album slightly warped too. Shoddy work all around.
Published 4 months ago by Peter Lawlor
3.0 out of 5 stars Quintessential Stones!
The vinyl I received was a bit dirty, appeared to have some smudges/fingerprints on it and a few scratches that bummed me out. Read more
Published 6 months ago by Alejandro S.
5.0 out of 5 stars Shm SACD review - Best Version Yet!
Yes once again I let my love of music overtake my common sense when spending money. But in this case I felt the current remaster was not great and I loved the sound of the SACD... Read more
Published 11 months ago by Stephen Bieth
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the Best Albums of the 1970s
A lot of younger guys are discovering 1970s music. I grew up in the 70s and my friends' teenaged sons and their friends are regularly asking me for recommendations of 1970s albums... Read more
Published on Aug. 5 2011 by Mark Anderson
3.0 out of 5 stars Slightly Disappointed
I fully agree with the previous reviewer. I expected so much more from this project after waiting years for more material to be released officially from these sessions and it... Read more
Published on April 18 2011 by Jobriath
4.0 out of 5 stars Great album! (but this remaster misses the point)
A 5-star album reduced to 4 stars because of the "overdone" (re-)remaster. As the knowledgeable reviewer at [... Read more
Published on Jan. 24 2011 by PGB
5.0 out of 5 stars exile on main street
Interesting to compare "old" exile with "new" exile. New music was well worth the wait
Published on Aug. 16 2010 by larrydean
5.0 out of 5 stars birthday gift
i have been a long time customer of amazon and you never disappoint - i bought this cd for my son's birthday and he received it in a timely manner considering he is in canada and... Read more
Published on July 31 2010 by Donna Close
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