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Exodus (French) Paperback – Dec 23 2002


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Robert Laffont (Dec 23 2002)
  • Language: French
  • ISBN-10: 2221098625
  • ISBN-13: 978-2221098622
  • Product Dimensions: 3.8 x 15.2 x 24.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 621 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (136 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #261,244 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"Passionate summary of the inhuman treatment of the Jewish people in Europe, of the exodus in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to Palestine, and of the triumphant founding of the new Israel." -- The New York Times


From the Paperback edition. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Publisher

Exodus is an international publishing phenomenon--the towering novel of the twentieth century's most dramatic geopolitical event. Leon Uris magnificently portrays the birth of a new nation in the midst of enemies--the beginning of an earthshaking struggle for power. Here is the tale that swept the world with its fury: the story of an American nurse, an Israeli freedom fighter caught up in a glorious, heartbreaking, triumphant era. Here is Exodus --one of the great best-selling novels of all time.

"Passionate summary of the inhuman treatment of the Jewish people in Europe, of the exodus in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to Palestine, and of the triumphant founding of the new Israel." -- The New York Times --This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.


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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By dougrhon on March 17 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Int his classic epic of historical fiction, Leon Uris pens his account of Israel's dramatic birth from the time of the first aliyah in the late 19th century through the War for Independence. He introduces heroic characters, dastardly villains and innocent victims. First and foremost, this is the story of the Ben Canaan clan. Heroic, emotionally damaged Ari, the Palmach soldier, his father Barak, one of the fictional founders of the Labor Zionist movement. Barak's brother, known as "Akiva", leader of the outlaw " Macabees", modeled on the real life Irgum movement of Menachem Begin. There is Kitty, the American gentile who falls in love with Ari and ultimately with the struggle for a Jewish homeland, Dov, the young embittered survivor of the Warsaw ghetto and Karen, Danish holocaust survivor who Kitty unofficially adopts. There is Ari's firey redheaded sister Jordana who clashes with Kitty's American idea of what a young woman should be like. and there are others as well. Uris uses the melodrama of the personal story of these characters to show how Israel came to be. It is all here, the escape by Barak and Akiva from their Russian shtetl and their hike (!!!) to the promised land. The horror of the holocaust. And most importantly, the struggle during the post-war mandate period with the British and of course the Arabs.
Uris is not the historian that Herman Wouk is. He has a strange tendency in his historical novels to change the names of people and incidents. For example, in real life, the ship known as "Exodus" was forced to cyprus. It is this that roused the world's ire. In the novel, of course, the ship is permitted to dock in Palestine. This confuses two different ships and two different incidents. Why does he use the name "Macabees" instead of the Irgun? Who knows?
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By Jason A. Miller on Sept. 23 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
While at work this morning, I was shown an original birth certificate issued in Israel in 1950. I actually felt something of a thrill of pride (even though I've never been there, and I've long since forgotten Hebrew letters). That's mostly due to my having finished "Exodus" last night.
"Exodus" isn't the kind of book you read for literary merit. The third word in the book is "plip-plopped", which isn't a word at all. If you're deconstructing page 1, you'll get annoyed the random shifts in the narrative voice. The book begins with a couple of plodding middle-American characters with silly names like "Kitty", and "Mark Parker".
However, Uris knows what he's doing. He's constructing an argument in favor of the state of Israel, laid out against 70 years' worth rampant European anti-Semitism. It's no coincidence that the first segment recounts the Holocaust (first, in the eyes of a girl who escaped to relative peace in Jew-friendly Denmark, and then in the eyes of an Auschwitz survivor), and then the second shows the seeds of modern Israel through a pair of mythic-quality Russian shtetl refugees who enter Palestine in the 1880s and begin transforming the soil. The balance of the book shows Palestine's struggles under the suffocating British mandate, and nascent Israel's miraculous victory over the various Arab states seeking to "push Israel into the sea". Played out over the epic history is a storyline involving the Ben Canaan family, Kitty the American nurse, her surrogate Israeli daughter Karen, and Karen's sullen, rebellious, Sal Mineo-type boyfriend Dov. The body count rises and the deaths become more personal, more tragic, as the story builds its way slowly to several shattering conclusions.
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By Jenny on July 14 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
If you want to learn your sympathies in the Israel / Palestine issue, read this book. If you feel threatened by it, you are probably sympathetic to the history of the Palestinians and Islam, who did in fact build their country and religious monuments on top of the ancient Jewish land. (the references to historical structures and places are all true) If you do not feel threatened, then you are probably sympathetic to the Jewish cause, or are a fairly neutral thinker who can face the reality that the Jews understood the purpose in work and eventually force to make such a land livable.
I read this book in one day because it was riveting. The writing is simple, but strong. The characters are somewhat simple, but they are not necessarily there to become an expose of the human psyche, but to tell the story of an era. They give it the human side in which all of history needs to be seen. They are individuals to show differing views, but they are also whole races to give a sociological kaleidoscope.
There is terrorism and wrongdoing on all fronts, but the setting given by Uris helps to explicate some of the causes that bring men to such ends. On the other hand, there is also a study in grace, when it goes on and when it reaches its human limit. All in all, it was a wonderful supplement to the spirit of a time when a people were truly lost in the world that destroyed them and protected them. I know that I need to expand my own knowledge of this issue, but it gives a great, yet sobering, historical backdrop to present-day activities.
If you enjoy the objectivism of Ayn Rand, you will probably enjoy this as well.
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