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Exploring Black Holes: Introduction to General Relativity Hardcover – Sep 11 2014


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley; 2nd Revised edition edition (Sept. 11 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0321512863
  • ISBN-13: 978-0321512864
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,012,068 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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By G. Pao on Nov. 10 2003
Format: Paperback
this is a nice book that allows one to approach general realtivity with somewhat rusty math. One should read the special relativty book by the same authors first though.
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By A Customer on July 29 2002
Format: Paperback
As other reviewers have said, Taylor and Wheeler accomplish something marvelous (and by conventional wisdom impossible), making a non-trivial portion of general relativity accessible to physics undergraduates. But be warned that "accessible" does not mean easy! A good background in special relativity is essential, for example from the authors' earlier book Spacetime Physics. Beyond that, readers must be prepared for convoluted reasoning and heavy duty algebra in some parts of the book, covering the more esoteric optical effects of black holes and the effects of rotation. It was an effort for me to get through this book - but well worth it.
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By henrique fleming on April 11 2002
Format: Paperback
This book is different from every other introduction to general relativity I know. And better. The eminent authors connect geometry directly to physics, bypassing tensors. Curvature in space is detected by very simple length measurements; curvature in time, by the lengthening of periods of oscillations. There are nuggets in almost every page. I loved the demonstration that you don't really need coordinates to describe geometry: the shape of a boat is reconstructed entirely in terms of distances. Their dynamical principle is the maximum proper time principle. The way they derive energy and momentum from this principle is sterling physics. You'll learn a lot of general relativity in this book. Not all of it. But, learning to love it, you'll learn the advanced topics that cannot be treated this way by yourself, in other books. Perhaps in the huge Misner, Thorne, Wheeler.
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Format: Paperback
I have not yet finished reading this book but my excitement over its brilliance forces me to comment. This book is shear magic in its ability to explain very difficult and strange phenomena in an intuitive and simple way. I have read the authors' book SpaceTime Physics as well as GR by Schutz and can do the tensors and all that; yet I am in awe of the ability these authors have of succeding at the near impossible -- an intuitive understanding. Using the study of black holes as the motivation for GR study is perfect. I love the choice of the variational principle to cut to the heart of the math. I recommend this book to anyone for self-study who has a smattering of calculus (not much is really needed). I am looking forward to studying Kip Thorne's membrane paradigm book next. Gentlemen, kudos in the highest!
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