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Fahrenheit 451 School & Library Binding – Aug 12 1987


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--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Product Details

  • School & Library Binding: 179 pages
  • Publisher: Turtleback Books (Aug. 12 1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0881030198
  • ISBN-13: 978-0881030198
  • Product Dimensions: 17.9 x 11.3 x 2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 159 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #462,817 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

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In Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury's classic, frightening vision of the future, firemen don't put out fires--they start them in order to burn books. Bradbury's vividly painted society holds up the appearance of happiness as the highest goal--a place where trivial information is good, and knowledge and ideas are bad. Fire Captain Beatty explains it this way, "Give the people contests they win by remembering the words to more popular songs.... Don't give them slippery stuff like philosophy or sociology to tie things up with. That way lies melancholy."

Guy Montag is a book-burning fireman undergoing a crisis of faith. His wife spends all day with her television "family," imploring Montag to work harder so that they can afford a fourth TV wall. Their dull, empty life sharply contrasts with that of his next-door neighbor Clarisse, a young girl thrilled by the ideas in books, and more interested in what she can see in the world around her than in the mindless chatter of the tube. When Clarisse disappears mysteriously, Montag is moved to make some changes, and starts hiding books in his home. Eventually, his wife turns him in, and he must answer the call to burn his secret cache of books. After fleeing to avoid arrest, Montag winds up joining an outlaw band of scholars who keep the contents of books in their heads, waiting for the time society will once again need the wisdom of literature.

Bradbury--the author of more than 500 short stories, novels, plays, and poems, including The Martian Chronicles and The Illustrated Man--is the winner of many awards, including the Grand Master Award from the Science Fiction Writers of America. Readers ages 13 to 93 will be swept up in the harrowing suspense of Fahrenheit 451, and no doubt will join the hordes of Bradbury fans worldwide. --Neil Roseman --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Stephen Hoye's narration is perfectly matched to the subject matter: his tone is low and ominous, and his cadence shifts with the prose to ratchet up tension and suspense." ---Publishers Weekly Starred Audio Review
--This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

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Format: School & Library Binding
This was an amazing book. I loved Ray Bradbury's long sentences. (an example is the first description given of Clarisse's face) His introductions to different scenes in the book were detailed but not quite straight-forward, always realistic, which gives a third dimension to everything that Guy Montag experiences throughout the novel. Since this book was set in the future, it brings many interesting questions to mind about our own world, in the present. So many people would rather not have to think; they want everything to be explained to them, to have only one answer to every question. Fahrenheit 451 is fantastic, and every one should take the time and money to understand it...Buy this book!
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By bernie TOP 100 REVIEWER on Oct. 21 2013
Format: School & Library Binding
One big rift between the book and the movie [Fahrenheit 451 (1966) -- Oskar Werner, Julie Christie] is that in the movie the "written word" was completely removed (even from the credits); where as in the book the state was against literature and not technical writing. Books are just symbols of ideas that could have been on the screen also. There is a difference between training and education. Among other reasons the book was a symbol of one mans superiority over another in a world of equals.

I do not want to tell much of the story, as the unfolding is part of the intrigue. However now that houses are fire proof the purpose of firemen is performing a service by burning books to maintain the happy social order.

Naturally one fireman goes awry after several emotional incidences that run counter to his carrier. This leads to all kinds of deviant things like reading. What are you doing now?
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
'think for yourself' Sept. 1 2001
By Snarled Yarn - Published on Amazon.com
Format: School & Library Binding
This was an amazing book. I loved Ray Bradbury's long sentences. (an example is the first description given of Clarisse's face) His introductions to different scenes in the book were detailed but not quite straight-forward, always realistic, which gives a third dimension to everything that Guy Montag experiences throughout the novel. Since this book was set in the future, it brings many interesting questions to mind about our own world, in the present. So many people would rather not have to think; they want everything to be explained to them, to have only one answer to every question. Fahrenheit 451 is fantastic, and every one should take the time and money to understand it...Buy this book!
Written in the basement of the UCLA library April 13 2013
By bernie - Published on Amazon.com
Format: School & Library Binding
One big rift between the book and the movie [Fahrenheit 451 (1966) -- Oskar Werner, Julie Christie] is that in the movie the "written word" was completely removed (even from the credits); where as in the book the state was against literature and not technical writing. Books are just symbols of ideas that could have been on the screen also. There is a difference between training and education. Among other reasons the book was a symbol of one mans superiority over another in a world of equals.

I do not want to tell much of the story, as the unfolding is part of the intrigue. However now that houses are fire proof the purpose of firemen is performing a service by burning books to maintain the happy social order.

Naturally one fireman goes awry after several emotional incidences that run counter to his carrier. This leads to all kinds of deviant things like reading. What are you doing now?
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
One of the great literary works of our time, but... Feb. 11 2005
By four sixty - Published on Amazon.com
Format: School & Library Binding
The Michael Moore bashing is out of hand. Farenheit 451 might be one of the great literary works of the past century, but Michael Moore has won an oscar, so he's good too. And hey he might have borrowed the title, but hey that just proves that 452 is still relevant some 52 years later. Anyaway, see any connections, between the society in 451, and America now? Great story, and Michael Moore is not poorly dressed (ever see People's Choice Awards ad how he was dressed there?).

There, I've said it both Farenheits are great, and if you can't see the connections, then well, I guess Michael Moore is even still ahead of his time , but will never be 52 years ahead of his time... Anyway, Science fiction has a funny way of coming true...


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