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Fahrenheit 451 Unabridged Cd CD-ROM – Audiobook, Sep 20 2001


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Product Details

  • CD-ROM
  • Publisher: William Morrow; Unabridged edition (Sept. 20 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0694526274
  • ISBN-13: 978-0694526277
  • Product Dimensions: 14.6 x 12.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 227 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (981 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #574,357 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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It was a pleasure to burn. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Scoopriches TOP 500 REVIEWER on Sept. 6 2012
Format: Paperback
Stop Thinking.

Stop Thinking Right Now.

Because that book you have in your hands will cause you to Think.

Unacceptable Behavior.

Prepare for the book to burn.

Thank You for your cooperation.

This is the future world existing just around the corner, only a scant few minutes from our present times. Everyday, books which are filled with ideas to provoke thoughts and feelings in us, are routinely challenged and banned by unthinking and unfeeling scoundrels. These immoral vapid inhabitants of our planet are constantly trying to control what you read in order to control how you think. The scary insane world they propagate is shown in all of it’s terrifying fullness in one book. A literary classic by one of our modern masters.

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. And yes, “they” have attempted to ban this book as well.

A Spoiler Filled Summary Follows.

First published in 1953, this slim volume tells the complete tale of Earth, sometime down our future road, where books of all types are banned. Reading is prohibited by law. Virtually everyone drugs themselves out on television all night and day. Into this time and place we are introduced to Montag, who, while out walking one night, meets a teenage girl named Clarisse. She does the unthinkable and goads him into thinking, creating thoughts of his own, and wonder about all aspects of his life. Montag’s wife is whiling her life away in front of the television, and he cannot seek solace for these uncomfortable ideas at work either. For Montag has the profession of enforcer of this societies rules. He is a fireman.

For in this twisted tormented existence, all houses are fireproof.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Xavier on Jan. 13 2000
Format: Hardcover
I hadn't read this Bradbury's classic for 15 years. I had 14 years old then and though I liked it, I appreciate it now even more. Should I think I was not mature enough to understand all the ins and outs of the book?
When Ray Bradbury published his Fahrenheit 451 several decades ago, he depicted a decaying society, only preoccupied by its facade of happiness. Not that people are entirely free of the usual constraints but everything is done through games, shows, comics for them to forget the notion of thinking, source of all distress and misery. Those who resist are destroyed, dangerous books (those *who* make think) are burnt. And finally, does it work after so much trouble?
Well, at first sight, it depends on the basic purpose of the system. If its aim is to make people happy, it's undoubtedly a catastrophic failure. On the other hand, if it plans on making people believe they are happy or at least act as if they were, the answer may appear less immediate but little by little, you realize that for most of the characters, and therefore for probably most of the society, it comes to the same thing.
Montag, the fireman who burns the books, is suddenly confronted to the emptiness of his life. Is he happy? No. He will refuse the system and fight, like Granger and the old Faber. Mildred, Montag's wife, has accepted it all. It's so practical for her to live without thinking, with a virtual family on screens around the walls of the parlor. She has friends she can talk with. She has plenty of leisure, goes on parties, but is she happy? Can she be happy when she frequently needs a bunch of pills to get dopey to the point of risking her life? Obviously not. Same for her friends, you'll see it fast.
Two characters are really apart in this book.
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By Mikerah on July 11 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
When I got this book, I didn't know what I was getting myself into. I knew the book was about a guy who worked as a "fireman" but that was about it. When I finally started reading the book, it far exceeded my expectations. It got me thinking about a lot of things in our society today that sort of mirror things happening in the book. It also got me thinking about I can do to prevent things like in the book from happening (SPOILER:unlike a character in the book). I enjoyed this book and I would recommend it to anyone who has read other distopian novels.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A science-fiction classic written by one of the masters. There is poetry here, and a message on society that will remain relevant across the ages.
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By Troy Parfitt TOP 500 REVIEWER on May 31 2014
Format: Paperback
Well, what can I say? I’d heard about Fahrenheit 451 from Michael Moore years back and I had a roommate in university who admitted it was the only novel he’d ever read. I saw it in a Blackwell’s window on Nicholson Street in Edinburgh and finally I bought it on Kindle.

The story is dystopian, so it’s incredible I didn’t enjoy it, but I didn’t enjoy it. Not that it matters. The work has sold countless copies, won awards, been taught in high schools, been adapted into plays and radio broadcasts, and I’m sure Mr. Bradbury has done nicely re royalties, and good for him. However, I found the prologue, where he talks about how he wrote the book, more engaging than the book itself. It’s no Nineteen Eighty-Four. Not by a long shot. There are, however, some wonderful quotes, and if you interpret the story metaphorically and consider the context in which it was written (America in the early 1950s), it helps, but the writing is so clunky and stilted and collegiate it is, well, gosh, I wasn’t expecting that. As soon as I finished this book, I started one called And No Birds Sang by Farley Mowat. Mowat's writing is outstanding – fluid and virtually poetic, such a contrast with Bradbury's often painful collections of words. But really, some great quotes. However, not so great as to make it worth three stars.

Troy Parfitt is the author of Why China Will Never Rule the World
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