Fairyland and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Fairyland Paperback


See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"

Join Amazon Student in Canada


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Gollancz
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0575081104
  • ISBN-13: 978-0575081109
  • Product Dimensions: 2.4 x 12.9 x 19.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 259 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,291,438 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Frances Huntington on July 6 2004
Format: Paperback
I have read a few of the books by this gent and to my way of thinking, this is the best. Published in 1995, it seems that everybody else is catching up with it now. Alastair Reynolds has written of indoctrinal viruses, but did they first appear in fiction between these covers?
At the start we meet Alex Sharkey, ex-con, nuaghty boy, but no ogre, no monster. Young Mr Sharkey is mixed up with something hitech that he cooks up on the sly, something that is about to become illegal. Then he meets the Little Miss and everything changes. Alex becomes a target who survives by moving. And Alex is not the old Alex anymore. The old Alex has already died and woken back to a new life under heavy manners.
Cut to years later in gay Paree. Alex is treks through an altered Europe, looking for the Little Miss, fomenting Revolution, fighting for his own life and those of his confederates. The book throw off fountains of virtual reality, biological technology, references to exotic Chemistry and Physics, the nuts and bolts of Cyberpunk. There is a difference. I don't remember Gibson making much of Biology.
Ever heard of George Turner? I'll excuse you if you haven't. He was the finest SF writer Australia ever produced. He said that in the future there would be more horrors produced by Biology than anything else and here McAuley proves him right. The artificial people, the Fairies, he creates and inserts into the world are Capek's robots, a race of servants who revolt and take over, change themselves and us, move the bottom rail to the top as the slave becomes the master. Think of the huge breakthroughs we might be on the verge of and ask how could they be misued.
Alex Sharkey pursues Fairyland, Utopia, his Little Miss, and it is all like being stretched on the rack.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A. J. Cull on March 27 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Set in a dystopian near future, Fairyland is filled with exotic and sinister technological wonders. Designer drugs, mind-altering viruses, savage "warewolves", personalities uploaded into virtual worlds. And, of course, there are the dolls, artificial beings created for humanity's amusement but which, like miniature Frankenstein monsters, become increasingly and alarmingly independent. Fairyland suffers from being a novel in three parts, with separate casts of minor characters, and this makes it rather disjointed. But the firecracker display of ideas is exhilarating, Alex Sharkey is a refreshingly atypical hero and, despite dating from over a decade ago, this novel remains relevant and enjoyable.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
"Fairyland" remains one of the most impressive works in post-cyberpunk fiction, conjuring a nightmarish vision of a near future Europe in which biotechnology has run amok, creating new species of humans designed for pleasure and violent sport. Paul J. McAuley's novel is a fast-paced thriller reminiscent of William Gibson and John Shirley's early cyberpunk novels in its pacing. Succumbing to the charm and vision of a megalomaniac brilliant young child, Milena, genetic engineer Alex Sharkey helps unleash a dire threat to humanity's existence, allowing "dolls" - bioengineered beings based on human DNA, designed for pleasure, slavery and wanton destruction in gladiator-like amusement games - the opportunity to think for themselves and understand the notion of free will. He will pursue these beings and other, similar, creatures across decades across a European landscape wasted by the ravages of war and poverty, searching for Milena and a means to ensure humanity's survival. Without question, "Fairyland" is still one of Paul J. McAuley's greatest works in fantasy and science fiction, demonstrating his great gifts in storytelling and writing.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 19 reviews
17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
He did WHAT to the Magic Kingdom? July 12 2001
By Michael Battaglia - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The scenes taking place in a far future Eurodisney basically made the book for me, McAuley's vision of a rundown and ramshackle former childrens paradise being changed into a place of forboding evil is probably one of the strongest SF images of the last five years or so . . . and the best part is that the book is about much more than that. McAuley is one of those rare writers that refuses to do the same trick over and over again (much like the highly recommended Ian Banks), and this book is no exception. In a not too distant future, McAuley imagines a gritty world with tons of throwaway details and some extrapolation of technology, one of those being "dolls" basically soulless little people. When a maker of designer drugs gets involved with a young girl who wishes to give the dolls sentience, he succeeds but the results aren't quite what anyone expected. McAuley's writing is densely descriptive and has an urgency that fits the story well, the plot moves forward steadily and with increasing interest as events start to pile on each others. He has this habit of starting a section by introducing people who are completely new to the story and then going with them for a bit, while this serves to give us other views of the situation, it also has the effect of sometimes slowing the plot down for a bit while you try to process everything. Still, his world is beautifully rendered with plenty to keep even casual readers interested and lots of other ideas and extras that serve to enhance his reputation as one of the more fascinating SF new writers to come along the pipeline in a while.
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
A visionary scramble through a genetically-engineered future Jan. 21 1999
By flying-monkey - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
There's nothing quite like 'Fairyland'. It's unneven in terms of its construction and character development, but more than makes up for it by the intensity of vision displayed by MacAuley. He has shown in his short fiction (see King of the Hill) that he is a master of the art of exploring the darkest recessess of our mythology (this is Brothers Grimm territory not Hans Christian Anderson!), and blending it into our worst imaginings about the future. Fairyland is a triumphant culmination of this theme- a high-tech future where the past is an ever-present nightmare. This is best illustrated by the inhuman fairies' capture of the artificial 'magic kingdom' of Eurodisney, turning it into something to be feared and avoided as the source of evil. Like Gibson on magic mushrooms. Brilliant!
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Where is Fairyland? Which Fairyland? July 6 2004
By Frances Huntington - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I have read a few of the books by this gent and to my way of thinking, this is the best. Published in 1995, it seems that everybody else is catching up with it now. Alastair Reynolds has written of indoctrinal viruses, but did they first appear in fiction between these covers?
At the start we meet Alex Sharkey, ex-con, nuaghty boy, but no ogre, no monster. Young Mr Sharkey is mixed up with something hitech that he cooks up on the sly, something that is about to become illegal. Then he meets the Little Miss and everything changes. Alex becomes a target who survives by moving. And Alex is not the old Alex anymore. The old Alex has already died and woken back to a new life under heavy manners.
Cut to years later in gay Paree. Alex is treks through an altered Europe, looking for the Little Miss, fomenting Revolution, fighting for his own life and those of his confederates. The book throw off fountains of virtual reality, biological technology, references to exotic Chemistry and Physics, the nuts and bolts of Cyberpunk. There is a difference. I don't remember Gibson making much of Biology.
Ever heard of George Turner? I'll excuse you if you haven't. He was the finest SF writer Australia ever produced. He said that in the future there would be more horrors produced by Biology than anything else and here McAuley proves him right. The artificial people, the Fairies, he creates and inserts into the world are Capek's robots, a race of servants who revolt and take over, change themselves and us, move the bottom rail to the top as the slave becomes the master. Think of the huge breakthroughs we might be on the verge of and ask how could they be misued.
Alex Sharkey pursues Fairyland, Utopia, his Little Miss, and it is all like being stretched on the rack. How many people reach out for dreams they cannot reach, wander off after a vision, a false hope? This book is about Sharkey's journey and the fantasy of Fairyland, whether it be London by night or Utopia. It is about the different fairylands that live inside peoples' heads. And of course, my old favourites, Good and Evil.
As SF, this is marvellous. It is pure wonder and horror, just bloody excellent, just as good the third time as the first.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Warewolves of Europe Dec 6 2004
By doomsdayer520 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Don't let this novel's fey title fool you. This is actually a chilling near-future dystopia tale about nanotechnology and genetic engineering running amuck, with some remarkable ideas by McCauley that give you the very uncomfortable impression that they could possibly come true some day. Psychological plagues are spreading throughout the human population through the use of microscopic "fembots" that can alter behavior and personalities, and these are traded like illicit substances and used for psycho-warfare and manipulation. Meanwhile, genetic engineering has resulted in semi-intelligent "dolls" used for human service and amusement. The two processes have come together to produce a new species of intelligent dolls called "fairies" who are being manipulated by artificial intelligence constructs to take over the world (creating their own "fairyland") and eliminate their human creators. This all culminates in a bizarrely psychoactive war in Eastern Europe. McCauley displays great feats of the imagination here, especially through the use of a wasted French theme park (which shall remain nameless) that has become a festering shantytown and breeding ground for inhuman revolutionaries. This novel is a bit confusing with all its subplots and ephemeral characters, but you can't deny that McCauley has come up with some of the most intriguing ideas in recent sci-fi. [~doomsdayer520~]
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
The Beginning of a Great Adventure March 23 2000
By "risingson" - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I felt compelled to write this after reading the reviews of this novel (the exception being the bloke from Newcastle).
What drew me into this novel is not just the Bladerunner meets Ribofunk imagery, but the almost travelogue quality of the narrative. From the tropical 21st century London, the slums in the shadows Eurodisney and the Parisian arcologies, and the still war torn Balkans, Fairyland reads like Robert Kaplan's travelogue _The Ends of the Earth_ thrown 50 years into the future. Also, this is science fiction that isn't fixated on an extrapolation of science (though McAuley does an excellent job with biotech and a disturbing view of biological AI), but also provides a realistic, if disturbing view of society and politics (the Serbian conflict fought with smart bullets and polymers, the Second American Civil War initiated by fundamentalists, and those are just the throwaway asides). For those interested in hard science fiction that is interested in more than just technology and testosterone, go buy this book. Also, if you enjoyed Greg Bear's _Queen of Angels_, you will definitely enjoy this novel.

Product Images from Customers

Search

Look for similar items by category


Feedback