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Fallen Angels [Import]

Leon Lai , Michelle Reis , Kar Wai Wong    Unrated   DVD
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
List Price: CDN$ 35.95
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Product Description

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Fallen Angels was originally planned as one section of director Wong Kar-Wai's best-known film, Chungking Express, but eventually it grew into its own distinct and delirious shape. In many ways, Fallen Angels may be the better film, a dark, frantic fun-house ride through Hong Kong's nighttime world. Part of the film is a love story between two people who have barely met: a young, ultra-hip hit man (Leon Lai) and the dreamy operative (Michele Reis) who plans his jobs. Much of the movie is given over to a very strange subplot about a manic mute (Takeshi Kaneshiro) who goes on bizarre nocturnal prowls through a closed food market--like almost everything else in Wong's films, this is antic, stylish, and oddly touching, all at the same time. It must be said that, also like Wong's other films, Fallen Angels is fragmented and oblique to the point of occasional incomprehensibility…but then suddenly something wild or wonderful happens, such as the moment when the killer leaves the scene of a spectacular shooting and is promptly waylaid by a cheerful old school chum on a public bus. These coups--whether lyrical, violent, or simply "how on earth did they get that shot?"--are tossed off by Wong and cinematographer Christopher Doyle with all the cool of the hired killer, as though the movie were a cigarette dangling from a pair of oh-so-casual lips. This is exactly why so many otherwise calm critics fell all over themselves in hailing Wong Kar-Wai as one of the most exciting filmmakers of his generation. --Robert Horton

Product Description

- Remastered From New HD Film Transfers
- Presented For the First Time in 5.1 Surround (Supervised by Wong Kar-Wai)

Commonly regarded as one of the most influential directors of contemporary cinema, Wong Kar-Wai (Happy Together, In the Mood for Love) has developed a signature style that employs bold, experimental uses of photography, music, and editing to capture the tension of the new millennium. Originally intended to be a third story in his now classic Chungking Express, Fallen Angels has emerged as what some critics have come to consider his (quintessential work.) Set in the neon-washed underworld of present day Hong Kong, Fallen Angels intertwines exhilarating tales of love and isolation, primarily the unconsummated love affair between a contract Killer (Leon Lai Ming) and the ravishing female Agent (Michele Reis) who books his assignments and cleans up after his jobs.

SPECIAL FEATURES:
- Three Behind-the-Scenes Featurettes
- Interview with Cinematographer Christopher Doyle
- Trailers
- Stills Gallery
- Enhanced for 16x9 TVs

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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
By M. B. Alcat TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Format:DVD
"Fallen Angels", directed by Wong Kar Wai, is the kind of film you cannot explain, but must see. Why? Because it manages to transmit the feelings of isolation, love, hope and despair of its main characters, characters that are not like you or me, but that feel the same things we sometimes feel.

This film is driven by inner monologue, that is, you can hear what the characters think. Due to that, you are able to watch their actions but also to hear their thoughts. It is interesting, but also heartbreaking at times. In a sense, "Fallen Angels" could be accurately displayed as a sequel to "Chungking Express", because it is also about people, their stories, and specially their longing for something they don't have but hope for.

One of the main characters is a hitman, Wong Chi-Ming (Leon Lai), who has a beautiful partner (Michele Reis) that coordinates his hits. Wong Chi-Ming knows why he became a killer, a reason that is strange but that makes sense to him: "The best thing about my profession is that there's no need to make any decision. Who's to die... when... where... it's all been planned by others. I'm a lazy person. I like people to arrange things for me". Despite that, he is thinking of leaving his job and becoming a "normal" person, something his partner doesn't like at all.

The other main character is He Zhiwu (Takeshi Kaneshiro), a young mute that lost his voice after eating a tin of expired pineapple. He Zhiwu has a weird hobby: to break into stores at night and pretend to run them, forcing customers to buy things. He also happens to fall in love with a very strange lady, and says to himself "They say that love can change a man. I start to find myself looking better and more charming, and suddenly I discover that I'm turning blonde".
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5.0 out of 5 stars Compulsive, Obsessive, Redemptive. June 10 2004
Format:DVD
"Fallen Angels" is really the third episode of Wong's earlier two-part film "Chungking Express". It harks back to the first noirish segment of that film, after the bouncy second episode stolen by pop star Faye Wong, but is even darker and more obscure. The characters all seem in extremis, on the edge of dissolution, junkies of one sort or another -- except possibly the hitman ('assasin'), cool, detached, in control. This darkness is expressed in the chaotic home movie ambience (of course, carefully contrived); some is even shot as literal, really bad, home-video-within-a-movie.
Though there does not seem to be a direct plot link between "Chungking" and "Fallen Angels" the same way there was between the two segments of "Chungking Express" (where Cop 223 turned down a suggestion of a date with Faye only hours before she fell in love with Cop 663, and Faye and 663 make brief background appearances in segment one), there are many connections. Some locations seem to be the same, and although the fast food joint Midnight Express so central to "Chunking Express" does not play the same role here, the restaurant and its proprietor do enter near the end. The mute ex-con (prisoner #223) of Fallen Angels and Cop #223 of CKE are both played by the same actor (Takeshi Kaneshiro) and both named He Qiwu [per subtitles; IMDB has He Zhiwu, closer to the soundtrack]. He Qiwu of Fallen Angels was made mute by a can of expired pineapple, while CKE's Cop #223 was obsessed with about-to-expire pineapple cans. At one point the Mute dances briefly in Midnight Express with the same moves used by Faye, as she danced her way through her work at the restaurant in CKE.
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5.0 out of 5 stars ...nothing more important than feelings... Nov. 9 2003
By A Customer
Format:DVD
i have to admit that my concept/experience/knowledge about movies is so so little that i wouldn't dare to write a review on films like Fallen Angels. however, what's important is my feeling towards this film. whether one sees this contention as subjective or not (or even objective) is what i don't care at all.
as always, Wong Kar-Wai's film is a kind of "love it" or "hate it" type of movie. and because of the commercial implications by using Hong Kong best actors/actress and pop idols in all his movies, 'art' film critics might cynically condemn his non-independent filmmaking spirit while the mainstream would see Wong's film as 'crap' due to his use of motion, colour, plots, narratives, etc.
but for me, it is the naturalness of his characters' interaction/exchange that i really love. though, Fallen Angels is more constructed/composed in terms of continuity and narration compared to Chungking Express, Fallen Angels' visual imagery is absolutely fabulous if one is really into some kind of abstract painting by Mark Rothko or Jason Pollock; or, in terms of music, if one is into drones and abstract atmospheric music, one will find Fallen Angels lovely forever. well, what's central to Wong's films is the investigation of human relationship.
if anyone could feel or sense the isolation of living in a cosmopolitan society (i mean isolation is not a new concept), let me elaborate a bit. if one has a habit or like to talks to oneself in an imaginary public sector, then one will find Fallen Angels so heartbreaking due to its prominent use of voice-over. its use of voice-over view point reveal and investigate the human psyche and isolation which will deeply resonate any individuals' feeling of hope and lost if being an individual means isolation.
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Most recent customer reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Stylish as fuuuuuuhhhhh
This was the first Wong Kar Wai film I've ever seen, and most certainly it won't be the last. It was visceral, smooth, and overlaid with a perfect amount of grime. Read more
Published 10 months ago by Lucien Cyr
5.0 out of 5 stars This is one COOL movie .. that what you think when you watch it.
This movie does not have the home run casting of Chungking Express; but it is the 3rd story that was originally supposed to be part of that movie. Read more
Published on July 14 2009 by Glenn Laycock
3.0 out of 5 stars not crazy about it
Wasn't feeling the chemistry between them.
Published on Nov. 29 2003
1.0 out of 5 stars The end of the road for this type of filmmaking
Style over substance sums it up . . . color instead of drama. . . kinetic shooting scenes instead of characters. . . silent and devoid of humans. Read more
Published on Sept. 11 2003 by R. Steinhardt
4.0 out of 5 stars Good movie, bad video transfer...
I cannot give an objective review of the movie because of the quality of the VHS where I've seen Fallen Angels. Read more
Published on July 14 2003 by Gerald Sioco
3.0 out of 5 stars Stunning cinema
Absolutely beautiful piece of film-making, full of some of the best cinematography you will ever see, along with thought-provoking moody introspection on the alienation of the... Read more
Published on Jan. 26 2003 by The 14 Amazons
5.0 out of 5 stars Watch it if you love art film
Please do not mistaken this movie as an HK action movie. There is action and violence but this is absolutely not an action movie.
Oh! I fail to describe it. Read more
Published on Sept. 8 2002
5.0 out of 5 stars Fallen Angels Wanders in Limbo...
In a gloomy urban setting of Hong Kong, Wong Chi-Ming, a lethargic contract killer, has become emotionally attached to his agent. Read more
Published on Aug. 25 2002 by Kim Anehall
5.0 out of 5 stars Film of the Month
Is Wong Kar-Wai the world's most exciting film-maker? Fallen Angels, his fifth feature and the follow-up to Chungking Express, constitutes strong evidence in his favor. Read more
Published on May 29 2002 by "devilcakes"
5.0 out of 5 stars A Master's Best
Wong Kar-Wai has become my favorite director. He's as talented as Kurasawa, Fellini, Wells, Antonioni, Bergman or Altman. Read more
Published on May 18 2002 by Craig L. Sayre
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