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Family Names and Family History Paperback – Jun 22 2006


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 262 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic (June 22 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1852855509
  • ISBN-13: 978-1852855505
  • Product Dimensions: 15.6 x 1.4 x 23.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 399 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,720,737 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

Hey's book provides a wealth of information on the evolution and development of the surname, its spread and mutation.
(Publishing News)

Book mentioned in The Guardian (Saturday supplement), April 2007


"a scholarly and readable study of the growth of English surnames based on the valuble work of the Names Projects Group at the National Centre for English Cultural Tradition and Language. It will appeal to the general redaer and to the student coming to the topic for the first time." Contemporary Review, 01/07/07
(Contemporary Review)

Title mentioned in Who Do You Think You Are?, 2008.


"a scholarly and readable study of the growth of English surnames based on the valuble work of the Names Projects Group at the National Centre for English Cultural Tradition and Language. It will appeal to the general redaer and to the student coming to the topic for the first time." Contemporary Review, 01/07/07
(Sanford Lakoff)

Book Description

Family names are an essential part of everyone's personal history. The story of their evolution is integral to family history and fascinating in its own right. Formed from first names, nicknames and occupations, names allow us to trace the movements of our ancestors from the middle ages to the present day. David Hey shows how, when and where families first got their names, and proves that most families stayed close to their places of origin. Settlement patterns and family groupings can be traced back towards their origins by using national and local records. Family Names and Family History tells everyone interested in tracing their own name how to set about doing so.
--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Format: Hardcover
One thing all family researchers necessarily have in common, regardless of ethnicity, is an interest in names. In this connection, you're fortunate if you have some English ancestry, for many less common surnames are still largely peculiar to one English county or another. The author's own surname places his origins in the West Riding of Yorkshire; he notes that he is quite used to seeing such names as "Staniforth" and "Broomhead," but that "southern" names such as "Gulliver" or "Loder" still catch his eye as being non-local -- which must seem very strange to most Americans. Hey, a professor of local history, leads the reader carefully through the historical immigration process -- Anglo-Saxon, Danish, Norman, Dutch, Flemish, Huguenot -- that affected the development of English surnames, outlines the methods available to determine the most likely place of origin of a family name not only in the 17th century (and earlier) but also in the modern mobile world. He traces many names as examples (they have their own index), and alerts the researcher to avoidable pitfalls; "Custer" is a common name in Berkshire, but the General's surname actually was anglicized from the Dutch name "Koster." Hey provides only the beginning of surname research, as his bibliography makes clear, but this engrossing volume is a good place to start.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Fascinating and scholarly introduction to English names July 22 2002
By Michael K. Smith - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
One thing all family researchers necessarily have in common, regardless of ethnicity, is an interest in names. In this connection, you're fortunate if you have some English ancestry, for many less common surnames are still largely peculiar to one English county or another. The author's own surname places his origins in the West Riding of Yorkshire; he notes that he is quite used to seeing such names as "Staniforth" and "Broomhead," but that "southern" names such as "Gulliver" or "Loder" still catch his eye as being non-local -- which must seem very strange to most Americans. Hey, a professor of local history, leads the reader carefully through the historical immigration process -- Anglo-Saxon, Danish, Norman, Dutch, Flemish, Huguenot -- that affected the development of English surnames, outlines the methods available to determine the most likely place of origin of a family name not only in the 17th century (and earlier) but also in the modern mobile world. He traces many names as examples (they have their own index), and alerts the researcher to avoidable pitfalls; "Custer" is a common name in Berkshire, but the General's surname actually was anglicized from the Dutch name "Koster." Hey provides only the beginning of surname research, as his bibliography makes clear, but this engrossing volume is a good place to start.
Was hoping for more info on the families Oct. 28 2014
By avid reader - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book was interesting but did not provide the particular info I was looking for among my various English ancestors.


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