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Comment: Ships from Toronto, Ontario. Hardcover Book Only. No other materials included (No CDs, passwords, study guides etc. don't know if it originally came with anything else). About 30 pages with yellow hi-lites. Mild dents to corners. Minor scuffing to cover. Pages bright. Binding good. (s2)
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Family Therapy: Concepts and Methods (9th Edition) Hardcover – Nov 24 2009


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Amazon.com: 39 reviews
21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
"The Standard Text" for Family Therapy Jan. 24 2008
By Sean M. McLaughlin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Nichols work, now in the 8th edition, is a seminal work in family therapy. This new edition, has some extra-features, which make it even more desireable than the 7th. It is more sympathetic to the postmodern therapies (solutions-focused, narrative), which I either practice or have been heavily influenced by. Nichols work is a great way to "break in" to this field as he survey the field, its developments, and various schools of thought. Better yet, he also includes a "recommended reading" list after each chapter of other seminal works in the field.

The danger of this book lies not with it or the author, but rather the student. Like all good survey books, contemporary master's level students often think they now can "go forth and heal" on this knowledge alone. One of my greatest gifts I received from seminary training was this: "Gents (we were all men), this class isn't the last word on this subject. This is the beginning of a life-long journey in this area."

Nichols book, when used in academia, is best seen in this light. Students need to know this is a secondary source which is to focus their reading of primary sources - you need to read Minuchin, Haley, White, de Shazer, Berg, Johnson, and Whitaker for yourselves!

As an introduction to the field, you will find none better.
25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
Biased Aug. 15 2010
By KJSCH - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Although the author states that therapists need to be cautious of bias, this book reads as if written in the 1950s. Abusers are all men, with the author going so far as to state that female abusers are not a risk because they lack the strength to do any damage. I was stunned to see that this text had been updated in 2010 - the author and editors clearly missed updating for sexual and gender stereotypes. In the world of this author, sexual abusers are always men and mothers always become the primary caregiver in the case of divorce (but a good therapist can convince fathers to step up). Gays get a small mention but not as parents, only due to the need to recognize that families receiving the news of a child coming out can react with upset, fear, etc., there is no mention of reacting with acceptance and love. Simple read but seriously out of touch.
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Terrible Textbook Aug. 31 2010
By jt - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This text is multiculturally ignorant as well as sexist. I don't typically review much of anything, but this text is bad enough that I feel the need to.

At one point in the book, the author takes the stance that if somebody in a family is physically abusive, it's the man. If the woman IS abusive (as well as the man), then it should be noted that unless she has a weapon, she isn't much of a threat as she isn't as physically powerful. Another point in the text states it's best not to take time to become culturally competent (as you'll never know everything), but rather it's best just to be inquisitive. It also includes nearly no mention of non-traditional families.

Bottom line: It's shameful that a book updated in 2010 is as narrow and outdated as this is. I'd recommend exploring all possible options before buying it. I keep all my texts, but this one's getting sold when the class is over.
16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
Cliched, outdated, superficial Sept. 12 2010
By FamilyTx - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
As a family therapist, I believe this book has never been very good, but it gets begrudgingly used in family therapy courses because there are so few overviews out there. After you read it, you will know very little about family therapy, much less how to be a family therapist. The real crime is that these authors keep making minor changes to create new editions, so students have to pay $80 for a new edition. Get a used copy of the 7th edition (Family Therapy: Concepts and Methods (7th Edition)). You'll save a ton and won't miss much of the little this text has to offer.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Informative June 19 2008
By Laura Klem - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is thorough and informative. Gives very good descriptions of family and couples therapy theories and techniques. It is the right choice if you are trying to get familiar with this area.


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