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Fantastic Four Omnibus Volume 1 HC Variant Hardcover – Jul 6 2005


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Hardcover, Jul 6 2005
CDN$ 230.08 CDN$ 108.21



Product Details

  • Hardcover: 848 pages
  • Publisher: Marvel Comics; Variant ed edition (July 6 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785118926
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785118923
  • Product Dimensions: 28.3 x 19.2 x 5.2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 2.5 Kg
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #939,316 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 37 reviews
46 of 48 people found the following review helpful
A masterpiece of comics July 22 2005
By Arthur C. Adams - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
These are stories that created the foundation for the Marvel Universe, and much of modern comics in general. This is the foundation for both the style of writing and art of superhero comics for over forty years now. Not only that, they're just good superhero stories.

Of course, if you're considering buying this, you probably already know that. Not many people are going to plunk down $70 for this collection if they're not serious fans of comics and the Fantastic Four. But if you are a serious fan, this is well worth the money.

The first thirty issues of the FF, plus the first annual, on archival quality paper, oversized and hardbound. And with extras! To be fair, many of the extras are reprints of Stan Lee's introductions to the Marvel Masterworks volumes, but there's more extras than that. Perhaps most interesting to me is that the original letters pages are reprinted (though, sadly, not reprodused at the quality the rest of the books are.) Its kind of amusing to see letters from then-young fans who went on to be major names in the comics industry, like Roy Thomas and the late Mark Gruenwald.

Flaws? Well, this does not represent the absolute best of the Lee-Kirby Fantastic Four. That comes in the (hopefully) second omnibus volume, when, in about a dozen issues, we get the the Black Panther, the Inhumans, Galactus, the Silver Surfer, and the classic tale of heroic sacrifice, "This Man, This Monster" from issue #51. But there are still great stories.

The art, to be fair, looks a little crude by modern standards. Remember, though, that Kirby was drawing several books a month -- he just didn't have the time modern artists have. Nor did he have high-end coloring techniques. His style was what revolutionized the industry. Yes, it had its quirks (square fingernails, for instance), but Kirby revolutionized how comics are drawn.

The stories, too, seem a little crude by modern standards. There's not a heck of a lot of continuity between issues -- certainly not by the modern standards of multi-issue, multi-title epics. But there's a lot here that had never been seen before -- characters who really seemed human, despite having super-powers, rather than the almost-perfect paragons of virtue that were the standards up until that time. They argued with each other. They had financial troubles. One of them didn't even want to be a superhero.

This is not a volume for a casual purchase. However, any serious comics fan should acquire one.
19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
the BEST way to read the F.F. early issues Sept. 22 2006
By Rick Lundeen - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
an earlier reviewer mentioned that it's better/easier to read these issues through the DVD-Rom and I would disagree with that because it's never as comfortable to go scrolling up and down each page of a book like this when you can have each issue reproduced in mint condition and read them all at your liesure in a comfy chair or in bed and appreciate the early brilliance of Lee/Kirby. It simply does NOT get better than this. Cannot recommend it highly enough. My question is when does the next TWO F.F. Omnibuses come out? We desperately need F.F. #31 thru 65 and then #66 thru 100 to wrap up the entirety of the Lee/Kirby run. Marvel, HURRY!
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
The Dawn of the Marvel Age Aug. 24 2005
By J Street - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Stan Lee (writer) and Jack Kirby (artist and co-plotter) really brought something new to the comics scene- fresh characters that behaved more realistically than their crusading predecessors.

What is most interesting about this collection is the reprinting of the fan's original letters to the magazine at the time of its publishing. It is thrilling to read the growing excitement over the Fantastic Four's character depth, which was unusual at the time- Mr. Fantastic feeling guilt for subjecting the others to cosmic rays, Ben Grimm's bitterness at becoming the grotesque Thing. These character qualities struck a chord with an audience that was hungry for heroes that were more like us- with doubts and flaws that all of us must rise above. Recall that this predates 60's Beatles era counter culture, making Lee and Kirby way ahead of their time. While it's true that the writing and art became more sophisticated as the magazine evolved beyond this collection, the Fantastic Four Omnibus Vol. 1 shows us the Dawn of the Marvel Age, and the initial reaction from the fans when it hit big.

This edition also includes a nice cover by artist Alex Ross, who has a real talent for painting the classic heroes in a photo- realistic manner.
17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
A True Comic Book Masterpiece July 21 2005
By Arthur C. Adams - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
These are stories that created the foundation for the Marvel Universe, and much of modern comics in general. This is the foundation for both the style of writing and art of superhero comics for over forty years now. Not only that, they're just good superhero stories.

Of course, if you're considering buying this, you probably already know that. Not many people are going to plunk down $70 for this collection if they're not serious fans of comics and the Fantastic Four. But if you are a serious fan, this is well worth the money.

The first thirty issues of the FF, plus the first annual, on archival quality paper, oversized and hardbound. And with extras! To be fair, many of the extras are reprints of Stan Lee's introductions to the Marvel Masterworks volumes, but there's more extras than that. Perhaps most interesting to me is that the original letters pages are reprinted (though, sadly, not reprodused at the quality the rest of the books are.) Its kind of amusing to see letters from then-young fans who went on to be major names in the comics industry, like Roy Thomas and the late Mark Gruenwald.

Flaws? Well, this does not represent the absolute best of the Lee-Kirby Fantastic Four. That comes in the (hopefully) second omnibus volume, when, in about a dozen issues, we get the the Black Panther, the Inhumans, Galactus, the Silver Surfer, and the classic tale of heroic sacrifice, "This Man, This Monster" from issue #51. But there are still great stories.

The art, to be fair, looks a little crude by modern standards. Remember, though, that Kirby was drawing several books a month -- he just didn't have the time modern artists have. Nor did he have high-end coloring techniques. His style was what revolutionized the industry. Yes, it had its quirks (square fingernails, for instance), but Kirby revolutionized how comics are drawn.

The stories, too, seem a little crude by modern standards. There's not a heck of a lot of continuity between issues -- certainly not by the modern standards of multi-issue, multi-title epics. But there's a lot here that had never been seen before -- characters who really seemed human, despite having super-powers, rather than the almost-perfect paragons of virtue that were the standards up until that time. They argued with each other. They had financial troubles. One of them didn't even want to be a superhero.

This is not a volume for a casual purchase. However, any serious comics fan should acquire one.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
a 21st century "HD" restoration of early 60's blurry newsprint Nov. 9 2012
By M J Heilbron Jr. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
All these customer reviews got it right. This is a beautiful presentation (better than the Masterworks sets of which I have a tremendous affinity for) of the first 30 FF issues, chronologically inserting the first annual as well.
The artwork is bold and glossy, a 21st century "HD" restoration of early 60's blurry newsprint with smeared colors. It's beautiful. The comics are reproduced a little larger than their original size, which psychologically fits. My hands (and eyes) were smaller back then; being a little bigger sort of retains that proportion. I was propelled back to my childhood, blissful.
The content, a bit creaky and clunky for "modern" audiences, is nevertheless brilliant. Kirby's compositions and Lee's characters HERE set the stage for everything after. This is Eden. This is the big bang. Pick your inception point.
For the super-hero comics we know today, this is it.
This is one big, heavy book. That's the downside. My arms hurt after a while; I had to remind myself to put this concrete brick of a book down every few issues or so. It leaves dents.
There are few, standard Stan Lee overly-effusive introductions, borrowed from the Masterworks line, and a few essays at the end from Roy Thomas, Paul Gambaccini and others.
A nice touch, one that I think should be mandatory for ALL archival editions, is the inclusion of the Letters Page. It further helps to place the books in the context of their time.
And LOOK at the people I found writing in those columns...besides the afore-mentioned Mr. Thomas and Gambaccini, there are missives from people like "Game of Thrones" creator George R.R. Martin, comic greats Steve Gerber, Mark Gruenwald, Dave Cockrum...Don Glut...and Fred Bronson, who might be the guy from Billboard Magazine, I'm not sure...
I can't wait to dive into the second Omnibus...


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