Auto boutiques-francophones Simple and secure cloud storage pinata Kitchen Kindle Music Deals Store Cycling Tools minions
Buy Used
CDN$ 16.72
+ CDN$ 6.49 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by bwbuk_ltd
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Ships from the UK. Former Library book. Great condition for a used book! Minimal wear. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Your purchase also supports literacy charities.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Fantasy and Horror: A Critical and Historical Guide to Literature, Illustration, Film, TV, Radio, and the Internet Hardcover – Jun 1999


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 234.56 CDN$ 16.71

Unlimited FREE Two-Day Shipping for Six Months When You Try Amazon Student




Product Details

  • Hardcover: 832 pages
  • Publisher: Scarecrow Pr; Subsequent edition (June 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0810835967
  • ISBN-13: 978-0810835962
  • Product Dimensions: 18.8 x 5.6 x 26.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,026,104 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From School Library Journal

Two previously separate volumes-Horror Literature and Fantasy Literature (both Garland, 1990)-are extensively revised and combined here. A companion to Barron's Anatomy of Wonder (Bowker, 1995), this selective guide includes articles on horror and fantasy poetry, reference and online resources, author studies, comics, teaching fantasy and horror literature, magazines, and more. All this is in addition to the lengthy annotations of the selected titles that are divided into chronological categories (e.g., "Fantasy in the Nineteenth Century, 1812-1899"; "Early Modern Horror Fiction, 1897-1949"; "From Baum to Tolkien, 1900-1956"; etc.). Few would quibble with the more than 2300 critically selected works that run the gamut from Stephen King to "Winnie the Pooh." The introductions to each section are analytical and knowledgeable, and the thorough indexes of authors, titles, and themes are invaluable. One tiny editing complaint-numerous pages in the "Contemporary Fantasy, 1957-1998" chapter are incorrectly headed "1957-1988."-Bette Ammon, Missoula Public Library, MT
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Using the same general format as his groundbreaking guide to science fiction, Anatomy of Wonder (Bowerk, 1995. 4th ed.), Barron and his colleagues guide the reader through the best primary and secondary literature in the two broad categories of fantasy and horror, written from 1762 to 1998. They provide extensive annotations and brief (one-paragraph) essays on each subtopic or item. In this enormous enterprise, Barron covers fiction, poetry, authors, media, the web, organizations, etc. Since the individual authors intermix fantasy and horror materials, the reader interested in only one genre is forced to scan through numerous citations in both genres to find relevant items. Separating the two within each chapter, whenever possible, would have made for easier access. Though this easily replaces all earlier broad genre guides, some genre separatists might be uncomfortable with the liberal intermix of fantasy, sf, Gothic, and horror. In fact, this remains two excellent reference books not quite comfortably rolled into one. Nonetheless, it is recommended for all public and academic collections.AAnthony J. Adam, Prairie View A&M Univ. Lib., Houston
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Hardcover
This marvelous reference book has chapters covering fantasy fiction, horror fiction, poetry in both genres, reference sources, teaching approaches, fantasy art and illustration, a theme index, and animation (film, television, radio). Two reservations kept me from judging the book a 5: it is a bit dated with few bibliographic references more recent than 1997, and it has some remarkable gaps of coverage. For example, neither Margaret Weis nor Tracy Hickman (nor the two as collaborators) appear; the book makes no reference to J. K. Rowling, either. A reference ignoring both the Dragonlance series of more than 150 novels and the widely popular and influential novels starring Harry Potter (at least the first one) desperately needs revision.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
Great reference guide April 27 2014
By Tracy Deaton - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Wow, there is a ton of great info in Neil Barron's "Fantasy and Horror" -- tons of novel plot-outlines and descriptions of short-story collections, overviews of the history of fantasy and horror, recommended reading lists and much more. I bought it for the information on horror, but even the fantasy sections are worth checking out, and shocked me about how many fantasy works I've read over the years. If you're a student of the genres, or if you're just looking for something good to read, this book will pay for itself quickly. I've only had the book a couple weeks and I've already discovered writers whose works I want to track down. I don't even care that J.K. Rowling's "Harry Potter" series isn't mentioned. Barron's science-fiction reference book "Anatomy of Wonder" is worth five stars, too!
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
A Marvelous Reference May 30 2001
By Curtis W. Bobbitt - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This marvelous reference book has chapters covering fantasy fiction, horror fiction, poetry in both genres, reference sources, teaching approaches, fantasy art and illustration, a theme index, and animation (film, television, radio). Two reservations kept me from judging the book a 5: it is a bit dated with few bibliographic references more recent than 1997, and it has some remarkable gaps of coverage. For example, neither Margaret Weis nor Tracy Hickman (nor the two as collaborators) appear; the book makes no reference to J. K. Rowling, either. A reference ignoring both the Dragonlance series of more than 150 novels and the widely popular and influential novels starring Harry Potter (at least the first one) desperately needs revision.


Feedback