The Farmer's Wife Canning and Preserving Cookbook and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 14.43
  • List Price: CDN$ 19.99
  • You Save: CDN$ 5.56 (28%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Farmer's Wife Canning... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

The Farmer's Wife Canning and Preserving Cookbook: Over 250 Blue-Ribbon recipes! Plastic Comb – Jul 10 2009


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Plastic Comb
"Please retry"
CDN$ 14.43
CDN$ 3.68 CDN$ 3.34



Product Details

  • Plastic Comb: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Voyageur Press; First edition (July 10 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0760335257
  • ISBN-13: 978-0760335253
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 1.9 x 23.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 567 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #422,189 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

From the Back Cover

The Farmer’s Wife was a monthly magazine published in Minnesota between the years 1893 and 1939. In an era long before the Internet and high-speed travel connected us all, the magazine aimed to offer community among hard-working rural women: to provide a forum for their questions and concerns and to assist them in the day-to-day goings-on about the farm—everything from raising chickens and slaughtering hogs, to managing scant funds and dressing the children, to keeping house and running the kitchen.

 

Decades before the advent of Cook’s Illustrated and its monthly doses of kitchen science, there was The Farmer’s Wife and her own science-based methodology, culled from staff experts, bulletins issued by the USDA, and various extension services across the country. On no kitchen topic was her expertise more critical than on preserving. Preserving then required—and most assuredly still does—precise procedures in order to yield wholesome, safe foodstuffs. And the farmer’s wife had plenty to preserve. She put up myriad stores from her gardens, fields, and orchards—not just the niceties of jams and jellies and pickles, but the fundamentals of plain fruits, vegetables, sauces, and soups, which formed the backbone of meals during the long, cold months when nothing grows. These recipes for canning and preserving fruits and vegetables from your garden or local farmer’s market have been updated with current USDA recommendations for safe use in the modern kitchen. Also included are recipes for how to use the tomato sauce, raspberry jam, and peaches or other fruits of the harvest that you’ve canned or preserved.

 

Here’s a sampling of the recipes you’ll find inside:

Apple Plum Jam

Rhubarb Raisin Conserve

English Orange Marmalade

Pear Honey

Currant Bar le Duc

Favorite Strawberry Preserves

Mixed Currant “Catsup”

Tomatoes the Old Fashioned Way

Seasoned Tomato Sauce

Chili Sauce

I Can Vegetable Soup

J. Fenimore Cooper Pickles

Bordeaux Relish

Indian Chutney

About the Author

Editor Lela Nargi is the author of Around the Table: Women on Food, Cooking, Nourishment, Love . . . and the Mothers Who Dished It Up for Them and Knitting Lessons: Tales from the Knitting Path. She is also the editor of Knitting Memories: Reflections on the Knitter’s Life, Knitting Through It: Inspiring Stories for Times of Trouble, The Farmer’s Wife Baking Cookbook, and The Farmer’s Wife Comfort Food Cookbook, all published by Voyageur Press.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Plastic Comb Verified Purchase
Recipes that have been tested by current standards are marked a different color and untested recipes in most cases suggest refrigeration or freezing. Great to see some old recipes I have not seen before. Love seeing some of the old pictures and descriptions too. Very nicely hardcover book.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Ufonda Smith on Oct. 6 2014
Format: Plastic Comb Verified Purchase
Very hard to follow.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 23 reviews
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
MORE OF A NOSTALGIC BOOK THAN A USEFUL COOKBOOK Aug. 1 2010
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Plastic Comb Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed the vintage pictures and history of canning. However, I found many of the older recipes to be useless because they didn't provide the proper processing times. They just said things like "process in a water bath canner." Aside from that there were some really good recipes in the book that had been modified with up-to-date "safe" instructions and current processing times. I have been looking for a recipe for spiced crabapple jelly and was really glad to find that in the book.
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
An outstanding collection of tested recipes updated by the current USDA recommendations for safe use in everyday kitchens Nov. 16 2009
By Midwest Book Review - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Plastic Comb
The Farmer's Wife was a monthly magazine published in Minnesota between 1893 and 1939: its staff of experts, bulletins issued by the USDA and canning and preserving topics makes for an outstanding collection of tested recipes updated by the current USDA recommendations for safe use in everyday kitchens. Add recipes of results and you have a real winner.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Not what I expected July 7 2010
By Ilovetigger - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Plastic Comb Verified Purchase
I was looking for some good old fashioned ideas for canning from my garden. Choice here was limited. Much more time spent on how to pick and choose product than actual canning. More information on what to do with product after canning if you are interested in that. Overall.....the New Ball Book was much more informational with tons of recipes.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
If you want alot of nostalgic memories of you and grandma.... this is your book for sure !!!! May 11 2010
By Carol A. Rotondo - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Plastic Comb Verified Purchase
It's almost like taking a step back in time... has many many versions of the foods I love...!! Really impressed with the binding... love it being spiral, makes for much easier reading on the counter instead of having to prop a book open etc... (step by step instructions are easy to read and follow) (would suggest taking the time to have all the equipment needed for your particular job... so as to not "over cook"...)_
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Thought there would be more..... Oct. 11 2013
By Anna Levia - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Plastic Comb Verified Purchase
I thought this would have more recipes on pressure canning. There were only a total of five or six pages that referenced pressure canning, and not a whole lot of low acid recipes. Not sure what I expected, but this book primarily deals with high acid foods. I like the nostalgia factor of the book, but I don't know that I would purchase for anything other than that.


Feedback