Fat Girl: A True Story and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Fat Girl Hardcover – Mar 1 2005


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 16.45 CDN$ 0.01

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Hudson Street Press; 1 edition (March 1 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594630097
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594630095
  • Product Dimensions: 19.3 x 13.2 x 2.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 318 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #994,969 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
"You're too fat to fuck " Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By M. E. Wood on July 30 2005
Format: Hardcover
This is not the first autobiographical memoir written by Moore. -Never Eat Your Heart Out- was a mixture of personal history with food factoids. Except for a few pages on being a fat adult most of -Fat Girl- is about Moore's childhood. Low self esteem ruled her life because of her abusive mother and grandmother. Days that were suppose to be filled with laughter, friends and special moments, were filled with routine torments of pinching, hair pulling and name calling. All supposedly because she was her father's daughter. The only sense of well being young Julia experienced was when she ate.
It's important to note this book is titled 'Fat Girl' not 'Fat Girls'. This is the story of one fat girl and her struggle to find love and is not meant to be a representation of all fat girls. Although any abused child (fat or not) may find glimpses of their life within these pages. Moore insists, "All I will do here is tell my story."
Moore divulges the history of fat amongst the people in her family but mostly her and her father. Many pages are dedicated to her father's love of food and their struggle with "This will be the last. I'll eat no more," syndrome. It's obvious throughout that young Judith is searching for and aches for love. Which she never seems to find.
The first person account is depressing on so many levels. After the first chapter I debated about not reading any further. In fact, numerous times I thought about quitting. There is a lot of self loathing which becomes quickly unnerving. It's interesting, in a voyeuristic kind of way I guess.
Little Judith comes across as neurotic numerous times. When she lived with her grandmother she would sic the dog on the hens and watch them die with "disorienting pleasure".
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By 3xCharmed on April 24 2009
Format: Paperback
I realy did try to enjoy this but in all honesty it was paragraph after paragraph of food she or others have eaten, would like to eat, think about eating, have seen others eat... There are very small bits of her history thrown in but not enough to hold my intrest.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Laura G on April 21 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Helps women see that there is a plus side to being plus sized! Not every woman is able to change themselves to meet society skinny view of beauty!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Kay on March 8 2006
Format: Paperback
I literally read this book in one sitting! It's sad and funny at the same time. I could relate to the author in some ways, not that I grew up fat but I grew up in a dysfunctional family with an alcoholic father. There was alot of emotional and verbal abuse. I laughed my head off at the "Nazi in the barnyard" part! (I had a mother like that!) It's difficult not to feel sorry for the author, I hope that it was cathartic for her to write this book, and that now she is in a good place in her life. I wish her the best! She is very brave and blunt.
Her story is inspiring to those who grew up with similar circumstances and to those who didn't. At least she has taught me to accept who I am and be brave and true to myself.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 7 2005
Format: Hardcover
This is one of those rare books to help you to understand what abuse can do to the inner workings of the mind. Judith moore shows strength and courage in writing about her life, her self inflicted pain, (just wanting someone to love her through thick and thin)and her fight to rise above it. Excellent book!
For those looking for similar reads, I want to point out-Nightmares Echo, Smashed and The Glass Castle
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Sandy Smyth on July 13 2007
Format: Paperback
This book was popular a while back, and I read it then. Now, evidently more have discovered it. Why more is not made of family dysfuction/abuse and overweight children is beyond me. FAT GIRL is not the happy ending you might expect, but it will open your eyes to why you do the things you do regarding food and relationships. If you're interested in fiction dealing with dysfunctional famlies, I'd suggest the books "I Know This Much is True" and "Bark of the Dogwood," but if you want a great self-help one, try "You Can Heal Your Life" by Louise Hay.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Product Images from Customers

Search


Feedback