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Favorite North American Indian Legends Paperback – Jul 13 1994


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Amazon.com: 12 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
An excellent source for multi-cultural studies involving Native Americans Aug. 6 2010
By Charles Ashbacher - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The myths and legends of a culture will tell you a great deal about their thought patterns and what was considered important. The thirteen legends in this book are about a great many things, from the origin of the world to how animals and humans are to interact. The legends and the tribe(s) from which they were derived are as follows:

*) "How Glooskap Conquered the Great Bull-Frog", from the Passamaquoddy and Micmac tribes
*) "How the Toad and Porcupine Lost Their Noses", from the Micman tribe
*) "The Meeting of the Wild Animals", from the Tsimshian tribe
*) "The Story of Grizzly Bear and Beaver", from the Tsimshian tribe
*) "How Master Lox as a Raccoon Killed the Bear and the Black Cats", from the Passamaquoddy tribe
*) "The Ants That Pushed on the Sky", from the Pueblo tribe
*) "The Little Boy Man", from the Sioux tribe
*) "The Daughter of the Sun", from the Cherokee tribe
*) "The Girl Who Married the Star", from the Sioux tribe
*) "The Man Who Married the Moon", from the Isleta Pueblo tribe
*) "The Laugh-maker", from the Sioux tribe
*) "The Bear Man", from the Micmac tribe
*) "The Friendly Skeleton", from the Iroquois tribe

This book would be an excellent source of material for multi-cultural studies in late elementary school or middle school classes where the goal is to cover Native American cultures.
More child appropriate myths! June 27 2014
By MarySZ - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am happy to have found this. It will be a great companion for the other Indian Myth books I purchased.
review May 13 2014
By sam - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Learning about folktales is a great way to open your mind. when I need some inspiration for writing my stories I read a book. I enjoyed the stories in this book and I learned more about the native American culture in the process.
Some may like it, others may not Jan. 30 2014
By Wayne S. Walker - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This volume from Dover Children's Thrift Classics, which I picked up at the Ohio Historical Society Museum in Columbus, OH, last fall, is a new anthology containing the unabridged text of thirteen North American Indian myths and legends selected from standard sources and intended especially for children. It is a sampling of stories handed down through generations of various Native American peoples, including the Tsimshian of the Pacific Northwest, the Passamaquoddy of Maine, the Micmac of New Brunswick, and the Pueblo of the American Southwest, along with the Cherokee, the Iroquois, and the Sioux. They include an Algonquin tale of how Glooskap conquered the Great Bull-Frog; "The Meeting of the Wild Animals," a Tsimshian myth recounting how all the animals came to fear the porcupine; and "The Man Who Married the Moon," a Pueblo story; as well as ten others.

Some people, especially those who enjoy reading native folklore, may find these accounts charming and brimming with humor, whimsy, and imagination. However, others may not care for them. In any event, don’t expect them to make a whole lot of sense. They certainly are quite fantastic and a few even a little bizarre. The language is not bad. One character uses the euphemistic “Confound it!”, which somehow doesn’t sound very Native American. As you might imagine, there are several references to smoking tobacco of the “peace pipe” variety. Some of these tales might make a good complement for students who are learning about the unique cultural heritage of North America’s original tribes. However, parents may want to preview them and take into account their children’s age and sensitivity. For example, in one story a kidnapped girl is forced, probably against her will, to cook a little boy for her master to eat. There are no graphic details, but it’s still a great big “ugh!” for children.
Youth Storytelling Awards. Nov. 24 2013
By Adra A. Wallace - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I use these books for prizes/awards for youth in my Youth Storytelling classes and events. The size and content is just perfect for the youth. The price is perfect when buying for many students.


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