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The ROM Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles of Ontario [Paperback]

Ross MacCulloch , Royal Ontario Museum
4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Book Description

May 2 2002
Our amphibians and reptiles hold a fascination for young and old alike. Often very beautiful and frequently misunderstood, they are worthy of closer acquaintance and greatly reward attentive study in the field. The definitive ROM Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Ontario is researched, written, and designed specifically for the Ontario reader and visitor. It is the most authoritative, easy to use, and beautifully designed guide available, with a stunning selection of photographs unsurpassed anywhere.

This landmark publication features:

•Detailed and clearly written descriptions of every species of amphibian and reptile in Ontario – mudpuppies, newts, salamanders, toads, frogs, turtles, skinks, and snakes – including notes on Appearance, Habitat and Behaviour, Reproduction (including mating calls), and Status.
•Stunning full-colour photographs from Canada’s top wildlife photographers, carefully selected for quick and easy identification in the field.
•Easy-to-read Ontario and North America colour distribution maps.
•Handy size and format, with photos, description, and range maps for each species all on one page spread.
•Glossary, Checklists, and Index.

This unique guide, produced in association with one of Canada’s most widely recognized and popular scientific and cultural institutions, is the guide to the fascinating world of Ontario’s reptiles and amphibians.

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Review

“A triumph. … An admirable volume for both beginning and experienced naturalists. … An excellent choice for anyone wanting to identify and learn about our native amphibians and reptiles.”
Toronto Star

From the Back Cover

“A triumph. … An admirable volume for both beginning and experienced naturalists. … An excellent choice for anyone wanting to identify and learn about our native amphibians and reptiles.”
Toronto Star

Inside This Book (Learn More)
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
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Customer Reviews

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4.7 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Useful pocket guide that lacks some detail Sept. 18 2002
Format:Paperback
Ontarians have not had a field guide to their reptiles and amphibians since Bob Johnson's Familiar Reptiles and Amphibians of Ontario (1989). Whereas Johnson's little book was illustrated with black-and-white sketches that may or may not have resembled the actual animal in question, this new pocket guide is a showcase for excellent herp photography, giving each species native to Ontario three full-colour photographs on the facing page of each written description.
It's important to remember that this is a field guide, focused on the identification of wildlife in the field, and as such is not terribly in-depth -- after all, it's supposed to fit in your pocket! Each species is limited to a page of description and a page of photographs, a format which, for the most part, works rather well. Information is basic (identification, habitat, diet, reproduction), concise and, for the most part, accurate.
But brevity can be risky, and errors can sometimes creep in. ...
Common names definitely suffer from the focus on the species level, as "Eastern Racer" and "Eastern Ratsnake" are used, rather than the more commonly used subspecies names of "Blue Racer" and "Black Rat Snake". ...
In spite of the real space limitations, I would have liked to have seen descriptions of frog and toad calls and of amphibian eggs, which are dealt with only occasionally (larvae and tadpoles are well represented in the photographs).
Those wanting to learn more about our native herpetofauna would do well to consult the excellent Amphibians and Reptiles of the Great Lakes Region by James H. Harding (1997). But, since that book is too large to tuck into your bag or pocket, grab this little book instead if you're heading out into the field and need to know what it is you've just found.
Was this review helpful to you?
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very nice! Oct. 15 2003
By Mark Nenadov TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
I'm not an expert who is able to critique this book indepth, but I've found this to be helpful. It may have some flaws, but I think it makes a wonderful addition to any amateur Ontario herpetologist's library.
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Very satisfied customer Sept. 1 2013
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This guide contained detailed descriptions and multiple pictures of all of Ontario's reptiles and amphibians. I recommend this field guide to any wildlife enthusiast.
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars  2 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Useful pocket guide that lacks some detail Sept. 18 2002
By Jonathan Crowe - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Ontarians have not had a field guide to their reptiles and amphibians since Bob Johnson's Familiar Reptiles and Amphibians of Ontario (1989). Whereas Johnson's little book was illustrated with black-and-white sketches that may or may not have resembled the actual animal in question, this new pocket guide is a showcase for excellent herp photography, giving each species native to Ontario three full-colour photographs on the facing page of each written description.
It's important to remember that this is a field guide, focused on the identification of wildlife in the field, and as such is not terribly in-depth -- after all, it's supposed to fit in your pocket! Each species is limited to a page of description and a page of photographs, a format which, for the most part, works rather well. Information is basic (identification, habitat, diet, reproduction), concise and, for the most part, accurate.
But brevity can be risky, and errors can sometimes creep in. ...
Common names definitely suffer from the focus on the species level, as "Eastern Racer" and "Eastern Ratsnake" are used, rather than the more commonly used subspecies names of "Blue Racer" and "Black Rat Snake". ...
In spite of the real space limitations, I would have liked to have seen descriptions of frog and toad calls and of amphibian eggs, which are dealt with only occasionally (larvae and tadpoles are well represented in the photographs).
Those wanting to learn more about our native herpetofauna would do well to consult the excellent Amphibians and Reptiles of the Great Lakes Region by James H. Harding (1997). But, since that book is too large to tuck into your bag or pocket, grab this little book instead if you're heading out into the field and need to know what it is you've just found.
5.0 out of 5 stars Very nice! Oct. 15 2003
By Mark Nenadov - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I'm not an expert who is able to critique this book indepth, but I've found this to be helpful. It may have some flaws, but I think it makes a wonderful addition to any amateur Ontario herpetologist's library.
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