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Final Cut [Import]

Robin Williams , Jim Caviezel , Omar Naim    PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)   DVD
3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
Price: CDN$ 10.86 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
3.0 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
By Daniel Jolley TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:DVD
I really liked The Final Cut. It may not have enough excitement to appeal to some viewers, but it is intense in its own narrow, low-key fashion. The story takes place in a futuristic setting, but rookie writer/director Omar Naim doesn't approach the story from a what-if science fiction angle; this is really the story of one man's inner soul and how one significant memory can haunt you even as it is shaping your destiny.

The story is centered on a fascinating premise - that one's memories can be recorded and played back after the individual's death. The Zoe chip makes this possible; it's a synthetic implant that grows along with you as it records every single moment of your life. After your death, a sort of highlight reel of your most significant memories is put together and shown in a special Rememory service for all your family and friends to watch. Condensing someone's life into a couple of hours is a tough job, and it takes a talented professional cutter to do the job right. Alan Hackman (Williams) is one of the best cutters out there. He sees everything from each person's life, including some pretty awful stuff, but he gives the family the good memories they yearn for. There are plenty of protesters out there opposed to the Zoe chip, including one of Alan's old colleagues. Like leftist protest groups everywhere, these guys have no problem resorting to intimidation and violence - they only worry about the ethics of their opponents, not their own. Everything comes to a head when one of the bigshots behind the Zoe chip dies. Hackman has the job of cutting the Rememory, but the protestors want the data in order to pin something on the dead guy and bring down the company.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars INTRIGUING IDEA THAT FAILS IN ITS EXECUTION... July 30 2005
By Lawyeraau TOP 100 REVIEWER
Format:DVD
This is a dark and moody futuristic film. In the film, affluent parents a pre-natal recording chip implant for their children. The implant, called the "Zoe" chip, records that individual's lifetime memories in real time. When the individual dies, the implanted chip in which all of the individuals memories are recorded, is removed and given to a "cutter". The job of the cutter is to basically edit the memories of the deceased and create a full length feature film of the memories of the deceased. This film is then shown at a "re-memory" ceremony held on behalf of the deceased, where the dearly departed is remembered the way that those left behind among the living would like.

Alan Hakman (Robin Williams) is the best cutter in the business. His handling of the memories of the deceased always end up with a film that makes everyone happy, even though the memorial portrait of the deceased may bear little resemblance to the way that the individual may have actually been in life. Alan likens himself to a modern day, functional equivalent of the sin eaters of old. He views his job as one of basically washing away the sins of the deceased for the sake of the living. Obviously, due to the extremely intimate and personal nature of what he does, a cutter cannot be someone who himself has an implant.

Alan is a stunted human being, due to a traumatic childhood experience involving a newly made friend. He was also orphaned at an early age. So, he is a guy who is really not too in touch with his feelings. He has a girlfriend, sort of-kind of, named Delila (Mira Sorvino), with whom he is trying, however badly, to establish a connection. Somehow, the path of true love does not go too smoothly for Alan.
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By M. B. Alcat TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Format:DVD
"The final cut" is a movie for the kind of spectator that doesn't mind a strange plot, as long as it is interesting and engaging.

This film is set in the future, in a time when parents can choose to buy a "Zoe" chip for their unborn child. That chip grows naturally with the child, and records every moment of his life. When a person with a Zoe chip dies, a "cutter" erases the bad memories in his chip, and makes a short film with the best ones, so the relatives of the deceased can hold a special ceremony called a "rememory".

Alan (Robin Williams) is known as the best cutter. He specializes in overly difficult jobs, namely in making good films out of the Zoe chips of dishonest but very rich people. That is the reason why the widow of a very important man hires Alan to cut the rememory of her dead husband. The problem is, that man worked for the firm that invented the Zoe chip, and a radical group that opposes that technology wants to get hold of his chip to discredit the company.

When Alan is contacted by the leader of that group, Fletcher (Jim Caviezel), his initial reaction is to step back and return the chip to the widow. Unfortunately, Alan cannot do that, as he needs something that can only be found in the dead man's Zoe chip.

All in all, I think this is a very good first effort by Omar Naim, the director. I believe that this movie was entertaining, even though somewhat overly dark, but I supposed that could be expected considering the subject. On the other hand, the ending was ultimately unsatisfying, and that is the reason why I only give this movie 3 stars. You will probably like "The final cut" if you rent it, but it isn't the kind of dvd I would recommend you to buy...

Belen Alcat
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.6 out of 5 stars  152 reviews
51 of 55 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Final Cut Nov. 9 2004
By Michael Zuffa - Published on Amazon.com
In the indeterminate future, people can choose to have a chip, called a Zoe implant, embedded in their brain that will record their memories. Upon their death, a cutter will edit those memories down to a two hour movie called a Rememory for loved ones to view. Alan Hackman (Williams) is not only a cutter, but he is one of the best. He can make a low life criminal look like a saint, and there is no job he will not take. He is a sort of Sin Eater, taking all the bad events of a person's life upon himself. He is somewhat antisocial, with a kind of-girlfriend named Della (Sorvino). Their relationship suffers because of his dedication to his job, and while she is not happy, he seems somewhat content.

Hackman is hired to do a Rememory for a wealthy man with a shady past. His widow wants the Rememory to make him look good, and knows that he can do it based on his reputation. Enter Fletcher (Caviezel), a former cutter who now is a leader of a group opposed to Remories. He wants to take the rich man's Zoe implant and use it for his own purposes. Hackman naturally refuses, and so begins a cat and mouse game to see who will end up with the implant.

Finally, interspersed with the story is a memory from Hackman's childhood that may have shaped his career path and the person he is today.

This is an interesting and entertaining movie. Once again, Robin Williams shows that he is excellent in more serious roles. Cabiezel is good as the bad guy, and Sorvino does her best with the small part that she has. This is an intelligent science fiction story that will make you question the nature and truthfulness of your memories. "The Final Cut" is a pleasant surprise that is in very limited release, so search it out and see it.
23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Be sure your sins will find you out. April 16 2008
By J. Munyon - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
Alan Hakman (Robin Williams) has the world's worst job. Set in the future, he operates a business that is responsible for "editing" the memories of rich, dead executive-types who's families want their memories to digitally be replayed during their funeral ceremonies. Some offer as much as $500,000 to Hakman for his services, and the sum of money is typically predicated on just how many skeletons the recently expired loved-ones had in their overpriced closets, and just how good a job he does at "cutting" those memories.

Hakman is himself no saint. A tragedy from his own childhood still haunts him and drives him to border-line paranoia. He is unsure of how this past episode actually happened, but is quite certain he was directly responsible for the incident, at least in his own mind. When Hakman discovers that one of his clients has hired him to erase certain memories of her dead husband in order to essentially expunge his dark involvement with their pre-teen daughter, Hakman's own personal ghosts come howling back to confront him and besiege him with questions on whether he should continue to dissolve certain memories of these shady dead men in order to continue making a living by splicing their memories and making them appear almost saintly.

This was a completely original and very entertaining film. Jim Caviezel and Mira Sorvino co-star. I recommend this film to anyone desiring an original plot with a highly-engrossing storyline.
44 of 51 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Intelligent, unconventional, and psychologically powerful June 29 2005
By Daniel Jolley - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
I really liked The Final Cut. It may not have enough excitement to appeal to some viewers, but it is intense in its own narrow, low-key fashion. The story takes place in a futuristic setting, but rookie writer/director Omar Naim doesn't approach the story from a what-if science fiction angle; this is really the story of one man's inner soul and how one significant memory can haunt you even as it is shaping your destiny.

The story is centered on a fascinating premise - that one's memories can be recorded and played back after the individual's death. The Zoe chip makes this possible; it's a synthetic implant that grows along with you as it records every single moment of your life. After your death, a sort of highlight reel of your most significant memories is put together and shown in a special Rememory service for all your family and friends to watch. Condensing someone's life into a couple of hours is a tough job, and it takes a talented professional cutter to do the job right. Alan Hackman (Williams) is one of the best cutters out there. He sees everything from each person's life, including some pretty awful stuff, but he gives the family the good memories they yearn for. There are plenty of protesters out there opposed to the Zoe chip, including one of Alan's old colleagues. Like leftist protest groups everywhere, these guys have no problem resorting to intimidation and violence - they only worry about the ethics of their opponents, not their own. Everything comes to a head when one of the bigshots behind the Zoe chip dies. Hackman has the job of cutting the Rememory, but the protestors want the data in order to pin something on the dead guy and bring down the company.

Hackman sees someone in the subject's memories that take him back to a memory that has haunted him his entire life. He rather desperately tries to find the individual and gain some kind of psychological closure for himself, throwing his monotonous life into turmoil and placing himself in great danger. It's a mission of self-discovery - and that only complicates matters.

The Final Cut showcases a great story - dark and personally claustrophobic, poignant, and always fascinating. Happy it isn't, nor is it conventional. It is serious, intelligent, and contemplative, raising all sorts of moral questions on both sides of the Rememory debate. By this point, we all know that Robin Williams is a master of drama as well as comedy, but it is still somewhat mesmerizing to see him carry this entire movie with his remarkably low-key persona. Some people may not like the dark cinematography and tone of the film, but I think they are great strengths that reinforce the artificial nature of the whole Rememory business. Hackman is basically unphased by all of the evil things he witnesses on his guillotine cutting machine, but you can only internalize so much without it exerting some kind of effect on you. The price he pays to do his job well is his increasing isolation from his fellow men. This character, not the Rememory technology, is the story here. As such, The Final Cut may not give everyone what he/she wants and expects from it, and I think that explains the mixed reviews.
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Eerie...and mesmerizing Feb. 22 2008
By J. Don Le Couteur - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
It's difficult for me, even after all this time and the evidence of such films as One Hour Photo, The Fisher King, and so forth to get it into my head that Robin Williams is not so much a 'comedian' as he is a consumate actor capable of portraying 'on the edge' characters. His portrayal as the disturbed and disturbing Cutter (one who edits the organic tape memories of a person's entire life for presentation to loved ones after that person's death)in The Final Cut is nothing short of awe-inspiring. As usual with most of his (serious)movies, you're going to be left with more questions than answers, more doubt than certainty. The supporting cast, all reduced to mere cameo roles by director Omar Naim, truly do support Mr. Williams' portrayal of a character one unfortunately must acknowledge is not too far off in our future. I doubt I'll ever watch this movie again, and I'm damned glad I didn't miss it.
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Robin Williams at his best Feb. 9 2005
By U2pop - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
Imagine in the future we all will have an implant in our heads that will record everything we see and hear. The main character, Alan, played by Williams is a "cutter". He takes your implant after death and edits all the footage so that your family can come and watch a "Rememory" of your life.

Alan leads a lonely, depressing life, completely devoted to his work. When a big project comes up he jumps at the chance but then he sees something that changes his entire life..

It's a really well made, moving, thoughtful film. Robin Williams at his best, similar to One Hour Photo but not to hectic or monotone. It'll remind you of gattaca and of how far technology and the human race will go. What if we could relive everything a person ever saw? The real question would be: would we really want to?
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