Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Finnegans Wake: Centennial Edition Paperback – Jan 1 1982

3.8 out of 5 stars 156 customer reviews

See all 45 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, Jan 1 1982
CDN$ 116.18 CDN$ 1.23

Save an Additional 10% on Textbooks When you Join Amazon Student
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

No Kindle device required. Download one of the Free Kindle apps to start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, and computer.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.




Product Details

  • Paperback: 640 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; Reprint edition (Jan. 1 1982)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140062866
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140062861
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 3 x 19.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 431 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars 156 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,181,602 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  •  Would you like to update product info, give feedback on images, or tell us about a lower price?

Product Description

Review

enhances the reader's textual awareness...The captivating, accessible and rich introduction by Finn Fordham enthuses first-time readers James Joyce Broadsheet, Dirk Van Hulle The editors have provided a lucid introduction and a chapter-by-chapter outline which gives one at last a vague hold on what's going on, but it's not overburdened with notes, which frees one to stop worrying and just enjoy the surrealism and exuberance of Joyce's language. Independent on Sunday --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Robbert-Jan Henkes and Eric Bindervoet are writers, translators, and artists based in Amsterdam. They translated Finnegans Wake into Dutch in 2002 in a bilingual edition, and it is their English setting that provides the text of this edition. Their translations of King Lear and Ulysses will appear in 2012. Finn Fordham is the author of Lots of Fun at Finnegans Wake (2007) and I do I undo I redo: the Textual Genesis of Modernist Selves in Hopkins, Yeats, Conrad, Forster, Joyce, and Woolf. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.


Inside This Book

(Learn More)
First Sentence
riverrun,past Eve and Adam's, from swerve of shore to bend if bay, brings us by a commodius vicus of recirculation back to Howth Castle and Environs. Sir Tristram, violer d'amores, fr' over the short sea,had passencore rearrived from North Armorica on this side the scraggy isthmus of Europe Minor to wielderfight his penisolate war: nor had topsawyer's rocks by the stream Oconee exaggerated themselse to Laurens Country's gorgios while they went doublin their mumper all the time: nor avoice from afire bellowsed mishe mishe to tauftauf thuartpeatrick: not yet, though venissoon after, had a kidscad buttended a bland old isaac: not yet, though all's fair in vanessy, were sosie sesthers wroth with twone nathandjoe. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
i haven't yet finished my first read through of this book, but even now i think it's fair to say that this is an amazing piece of work. i just want to reiterate what a couple of people have said. firstly this is not literature, as such, it shares far more with music than it does with literature, and secondly, it should be read as you would listen to music, letting it wash over you, not trying to control any of it, not trying to realize what is happening. you should realize that after a while things will make sense, and even if the book never makes sense to you entirely it doesn't matter. to view this book as beautiful nonsense does no disservice to it, i think, because it is definitely the ultimate in beautiful nonsense if that's the way you want to see it.
and really, if you're going to write this off as gibberish, realize the man spent 17 years of his life perfecting this book. he went blind while writing it. his daughter was put into a mental asylum and europe was in the begining throes of world war II and still he wrote this book. more work has been lovingly poured into these pages than most writers put into their entire career. if you don't like it, fine, but calling this book gibberish is doing a huge disservice to the author and only making yourself look stupid. just say you don't like it, that's all you need to say.
11 of 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I just finished reading FW last night after almost six weeks of thorough plowing-ahead through it. I don't know where to begin in my review of it. I would start by summing it up in the word amazing. This book reinvents language. All through school, we're taught grammar, spelling, punctuation, the format for writing essays, letters, etc., but Joyce rejects that education, says the hell with it and does his own thing. What interpretation of a word is right? Is there a correct interpretation to be conceived? Is there any possible way to wrestle the magnitude of this book to the ground and pin it down to really understand what's going on?? Who knows. Joyce has the reader in the palm of his hand, and it's frightening what FW can do to one's mind. I'm sure that now everything else I read will make me think of Joyce in one way or another. I probably don't know 2% of the amount of foreign languages, literary, geographical, historical and mythological allusions and references which are crammed into the book, but the parts that I CAN decipher are very clever. It's not an interesting "story", but it's captivating simply because it's such an enigma of a book.
There is not so much a story here as there is a SERIES of stories or vignettes parodying various myths, historical events, etc. But several patterns occur and reoccur. Variations of the initials H C E and A L P (What does Joyce achieve with FW? Why, He Confuses Everyone! All Living Persons!), rearrangements of the name of Finn MacCool, the mythological Irish hero, and the predominant Vicoian theme of history repeating itself. H C E is born and reborn as Adam, as Humpty Dumpty, as Finn MacCool himself.. ad infinitum.
Read more ›
3 of 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
Joyce, man of Letters, fluent in Languages, Traveler in circles high and low and places near and far, Scholar of knowledge, Prophet to Mankind.

Joyce's Ulysses (is the story of a young man) whose framework is Homer's Odyssey: a tale of Modern-day Odysseus' personal existential/sexual quest overcoming his psychological internal travails (not Odysseus' external travails) affirming humanity (the fundamental family unit: the father, mother, son, and daughter). Joyce's FINNEGANS WAKE (is the story of a mature man) whose framework is Giambattista Vico's "La Scienza Nuova's" 4 stages of history (cyclic): theocratic to aristocratic to democratic to chaos (followed by Joyce's God "thunderclap") which ends chaos and restarts the world again with theocracy.

Both FINNEGANS WAKE (FW) and Ulysses are situated in Dublin (Ireland) and though both books were written on the European continent, Joyce memorializes his birth home. FW is Joyce's continuation of Ulysses on a grander scale: Bloom becomes all-men (HCE) and Dublin becomes the World. Joyce's Ulysses (Bloom) is an energetic man hopping out of bed, plunging into the Dublin day, waging battles real and unreal, exhausted by controversy and rejuvenated by love (Molly). Joyce's FINNEGANS WAKE (HCE) is man ever-living, man of all wisdom, man of all compassion, man of all understanding, man of all time - Joyce's FW protagonist is Finnegan, who (re)incarnates to HCE, who will (re)incarnate to Shem and Shaun.

Reading FW is entering the "mind of James Joyce", who for two decades labored on his masterwork - the mind of Joyce is the "library of mankind" he has reordered dictionaries, encyclopedias, and volumes of knowledge to reveal Mankind's thoughts, conscious and unconscious, in his masterwork.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Joyce, man of Letters, fluent in Languages, Traveler in circles high and low and places near and far, Scholar of knowledge, Prophet to Mankind.

Joyce's Ulysses (is the story of a young man) whose framework is Homer's Odyssey: a tale of Modern-day Odysseus' personal existential/sexual quest overcoming his psychological internal travails (not Odysseus' external travails) affirming humanity (the fundamental family unit: the father, mother, son, and daughter). Joyce's FINNEGANS WAKE (is the story of a mature man) whose framework is Giambattista Vico's "La Scienza Nuova's" 4 stages of history (cyclic): theocratic to aristocratic to democratic to chaos (followed by Joyce's God "thunderclap") which ends chaos and restarts the world again with theocracy.

Both FINNEGANS WAKE (FW) and Ulysses are situated in Dublin (Ireland) and though both books were written on the European continent, Joyce memorializes his birth home. FW is Joyce's continuation of Ulysses on a grander scale: Bloom becomes all-men (HCE) and Dublin becomes the World. Joyce's Ulysses (Bloom) is an energetic man hopping out of bed, plunging into the Dublin day, waging battles real and unreal, exhausted by controversy and rejuvenated by love (Molly). Joyce's FINNEGANS WAKE (HCE) is man ever-living, man of all wisdom, man of all compassion, man of all understanding, man of all time - Joyce's FW protagonist is Finnegan, who (re)incarnates to HCE, who will (re)incarnate to Shem and Shaun.

Reading FW is entering the "mind of James Joyce", who for two decades labored on his masterwork - the mind of Joyce is the "library of mankind" he has reordered dictionaries, encyclopedias, and volumes of knowledge to reveal Mankind's thoughts, conscious and unconscious, in his masterwork.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse

Most recent customer reviews



Feedback