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Firehouse Audio Cassette – Audiobook, Unabridged


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Product Details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio; Unabridged edition (May 29 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1590863437
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590863435
  • Product Dimensions: 18.2 x 11 x 3.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 168 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

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Format: Hardcover
Expecting a well-composed book from a popular and proficient historian, it was no surprise that it was memorable! Every word, every page was profoundly interesting, whether details were sadly moving or funny, the message was clear! This is a short and meaningful read.
As a person who was geographically distant, Colorado, from the tragedy, the horror effected the nation and me emotionally. When I learned that Pulitizer Prize winner and author Halberstam had written a book about that specific firehouse that lost 12 men, I wanted to read it.
Once you begin reading, you easily learn who the firemen were, their decisions to become firemen, their odd quirks, their funny moments, their other jobs, their passions, and of course their family. What is moving is the strong sincere bond they share, unique friendships, caring people willing to give their time to help each other out.
It was the talk that Joseph Ginley, whose firefighter son John Ginley died that made a profound impression. The father told them firefighting was a good life, you lived with other men in genuine camaraderie, and you ended up, almost without realizing it, having the rarest kind of friendships, ones with men who were willing to die for one another.
I came with a strong understanding of how a firefighter truly becomes this spirit of humanity and someone willing to give up their life for you.
On the inside cover is a memorial, the original blackboard with the names and their assignments. It's eerie. And as Halberstam begins, he shares just enough facts about the firehouse in Manhattan, it's origin and renovation. We learn the dynamics of highrise firehouses versus suburban firehouses and its firemen.
Then, you are immersed into a personal portrayal of each firefighter.
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Format: Hardcover
Halberstam does a great job of personalizing the September 11, 2001 tragedy by the portrayal of 13 brave New York firefighters of Engine 40, Ladder 35. Twelve of these men died on that day, along with many employees of the World Trade Center and countless other firemen. Halberstam gives a short biography of these thirteen along with a history of this particular firehouse.
This is a touching tribute to these firemen. All of them were male and most were white. Halberstam paints the positive side of all these men and makes them heroes.
The one small criticism I have of this book is that it makes these men larger than life. They are certainly heroes for going into a dangerous area with less than good prospects of returning.
These were men performing a dangerous job, but they were still human and had all the frailities of humans. What of the other hundreds of firemen who did not return that day? The tragedy of those other hundreds are lost in this story. This is a good book to read, but the reader has to bear in mind the other losses on that tragic day.
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Format: Hardcover
David Halberstam has written an engrossing and touching tribute to not just the FDNY but to firefighters everywhere. He does a masterful job of bringing us inside the firehouse and showing what life is like for the men and women who put their lives on the line every day. This is classic Halberstam and a very satisfying read. I wish it had been a little longer but it's still a superb book.
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Format: Paperback
'Firehouse' is a wonderful story of 12 men who perished while trying to save lives in the midst of chaos at Ground Zero. David Halberstam, America's finest non-fiction writer, painstakingly describes the unique atmosphere of the firehouse and the deep bonds that form between the men. Above all, they strive - when the hour calls - to be, above all else, 'calm' and to 'do the right thing.'
On September 11th, these 12 men succeeded.
David Halberstam tells you how these men made a difference to the people in their lives.
If you don't know Halberstam's work that well, 'Firehouse' is a great intro for you. Clocking in 500 pages *less* than some of his classic masterpieces, you can get a feel for the master's classic 10+ page in-depth potrayals that cut to the essence of somebody's character. And you only need a couple of hours to tackle this short masterpiece.
Read it now and pass it on. It's a great story to share.
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Format: Hardcover
Mr. Halberstam, known well for his books about history, has written a little book about 9/11 that will hopefully remain long after most of the other 9/11 novels are ancient history. This novel tells the story of Engine 40, Ladder 35 in Midtown Manhattan, a firehouse that lost 12 of 13 men who went to the World Trade Center.
Each fireman is described - what role he had in the firehouse and how he came to be a fireman. The story of the 13th fireman, Kevin Shea, the one who lived, is also told. Some have criticized this story because it leaves out any negatives, character flaws, etc. that these men had. I dispute this as one in particular is characterized as a "human cactus". And why, I ask, should we want to learn the things people disliked about the men who died? They did die as heroes, even though this book illustrates that heroes is probably the last thing that any of these men would have wanted to be called. They were just doing their jobs.
The book also goes into some detail about the families of these men and how they reacted after the tragedy when they came to realize that their husband/son/father would not be coming home.
Out of all the books written about September 11th, this is one that deserves to stand the test of time. It wasn't written in a hurry so that it would sell tons of copies and make lots of money - instead it was published in May 2002, long after many books had been out and the publishing craze seemed to be over. It also serves as a reminder of what happened that day. Eventually, 9/11/01 will be just another date, hard as it seems to believe right now. Eventually it will be like 12/7/41 and children will learn of it, but not fully understand and appreciate the tragedy that occurred that day. If this book is still around, I will recommend it be read by everyone who doesn't remember that day, so they can understand that lives were lost that day - lives of real people.
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