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Fires on the Plain (Criterion Collection)
Format: DVDChange
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on June 27, 2000
This is a film about man in extremis. Retreating, defeated batallions of Japanese soldiers in WWII on the island of Leyte in the Phillipines find themselves sinking ineluctably toward barbarism. The wounded, the desperate, the starving--all are paraded before us in Ichikawa's pitiless, sometimes bitterly ironic pageant of man's descent toward his basest impulses. The fires of the plain of the title refer to distant smoke from fires on the horizon that the soldiers see from time to time. The fires are symbols of hope of release from the carnage and despair surrounding the soldiers. The final irony is how fraudulent too this hope turns out to be. All are caught in the web of deceit, of trickery, of brutality that man in his primitive state so easily reverts to. Just about every sacred cow--brotherhood, respect, honor--is refuted. Man is both a figurative and literal cannibal, preying on his fellow soldiers, his friends. The film is harshly realistic yet surreal and nightmarish--barren landscapes of corpses, dung-eating madmen, men crawling like beasts over a trench. Ichikawa's images have a barbaric splendor and dreamlike aura, reinforced by the dissonant, percussive soundtrack with its echoes of Bartok. Not a film for those unwilling to face the extent of man's capacity for monstrosity head on; for others, it's a harrowing, deeply unsettling experience.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on March 11, 2013
This movie will stun most non-military scholars with its depiction of a previously disciplined army that has been shattered by defeat. The soldiers lose their cohesion as their previous military structures collapse upon defeat. The soldiers are reduced to such a state that their previous tightly organized structure no longer can support them. They are reduced to becoming non-entities in a bizarre "Hobbesian" world of might makes right and there are no rules to follow except the law of the jungle. They devolve into beings that survive by stealing from the weak, brutality and guile. They become just another predator roaming the jungle in their quest for survival. The final installment is when the strong prey upon those unable to defend themselves to provide food for the strong who delude themselves by calling their cannibalism victims "Monkey Meat." It is a film that displays war and its aftermath as it is. Their is no glory for the defeated, no honour just the most base instincts to stay alive. For serious film collectors about War it is a must have!
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