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Of Flies, Mice, and Men Paperback – Apr 2 2001


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 166 pages
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press; New edition edition (April 2 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0674005384
  • ISBN-13: 978-0674005389
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 12.7 x 19.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 272 g
  • Average Customer Review: 1.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,857,054 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Customer Reviews

1.8 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

By Frank on Dec 1 2002
Format: Hardcover
I agree with the other reviews -- this book, by a Nobel Prize winner, no less, has a fascinating topic; yet, over and over, the author starts building up to a conclusion, and just as he's about to reach that conclusion and share the learned insights, he goes off on another path.
He also makes glaring mistakes about relativity and astronomy when he claims "that if you travel long enough and fast enough through the galaxies, you'll become young again" and "our entire world came into being in a few hundredths of a second."
Instead, very fast travel will make you age more slowly than your non-traveling and relatively fast-aging peers, but you won't "become young again," and the Earth was formed in a very slow process -- it was the initial Big Bang, not the creation of the Earth, that was fast.
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Format: Paperback
Like music out of the romantic period, this book starts going nowhere, then promises to go somewhere, but ends up going nowhere.
The middle chapters talking about Lysenko and his anti-science... and the parts about genome research were interesting.
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Format: Hardcover
Perhaps it's the translation, but this book dances around its point, and lacks coherence. It's meant, I think, to convey a sense of how it feels to work on science, particularly biological science, but it never really draws us in. Written more as a series of independent essays, it turns out to be not all that memorable, and not all that interesting.
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By A Customer on June 8 1999
Format: Hardcover
This book is nice to read. It has a wonderful chapter on good and evil, in which you are shown an array of new perspectives. However, it lacks a common argument. It nibbles here and there, without apparent coherence. Also, Jacob, as a research scientist, understandably seems to feel the need to quote someone to corroborate everything he says, which means that the book quotes nearly everyone who's name is known, and these quotations lack relevance and insight most of the time.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Neither fish nor fowl July 10 2000
By Jay Ackroyd - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Perhaps it's the translation, but this book dances around its point, and lacks coherence. It's meant, I think, to convey a sense of how it feels to work on science, particularly biological science, but it never really draws us in. Written more as a series of independent essays, it turns out to be not all that memorable, and not all that interesting.
6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Goes nowhere Dec 1 2002
By Frank - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I agree with the other reviews -- this book, by a Nobel Prize winner, no less, has a fascinating topic; yet, over and over, the author starts building up to a conclusion, and just as he's about to reach that conclusion and share the learned insights, he goes off on another path.
He also makes glaring mistakes about relativity and astronomy when he claims "that if you travel long enough and fast enough through the galaxies, you'll become young again" and "our entire world came into being in a few hundredths of a second."
Instead, very fast travel will make you age more slowly than your non-traveling and relatively fast-aging peers, but you won't "become young again," and the Earth was formed in a very slow process -- it was the initial Big Bang, not the creation of the Earth, that was fast.
5 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Easy to read, yet lacking the inefable June 7 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This book is nice to read. It has a wonderful chapter on good and evil, in which you are shown an array of new perspectives. However, it lacks a common argument. It nibbles here and there, without apparent coherence. Also, Jacob, as a research scientist, understandably seems to feel the need to quote someone to corroborate everything he says, which means that the book quotes nearly everyone who's name is known, and these quotations lack relevance and insight most of the time.
2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Starkly Mediocre May 29 2001
By Thomas NeSmith - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Like music out of the romantic period, this book starts going nowhere, then promises to go somewhere, but ends up going nowhere.
The middle chapters talking about Lysenko and his anti-science... and the parts about genome research were interesting.

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