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Flood Tide Paperback – Large Print, Feb 1999


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Paperback, Large Print, Feb 1999
CDN$ 420.88 CDN$ 22.70

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 848 pages
  • Publisher: Thorndike Pr; Lrg edition (February 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786212705
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786212705
  • Product Dimensions: 21.5 x 14 x 3.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 272 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (143 customer reviews)

Product Description

From Amazon

From the moment you begin Clive Cussler's latest undersea thriller, you know that you're in the hands of a old pro; thus any lingering crotchetiness over the book's stereotypical villains is offset by deft plotting and taut action. Flood Tide details the exploits of Dirk Pitt, Special Projects Director of the National Underwater and Marine Agency, whom Cussler fans already know and love. Judging by this book, "Special Projects" seems to be a euphemism for blowing stuff up. Pitt's worthy adversary is Qin Shang, a Chinese shipping tycoon who is definitely from the Fu Manchu school of management. As part of a nefarious plot to bring the United States to its knees with a flood of illegal immigrants, Qin Shang operates a secluded gulag in rural Washington, which the vacationing (ha!) Pitt stumbles upon. A lot of entertaining mayhem ensues, both on the water and under it. Flood Tide's enthusiastic xenophobia can stick in the throat, and may get in the way for some. But that flaw aside, it delivers the speed and shocks necessary. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

YA. Once again, the indestructible Dirk Pitt saves the country from possible economic collapse, while at the same time destroying an evil villain, finding a lost treasure, and saving a woman's life. The vividly described action takes readers from the ports of Hong Kong to picturesque Washington State and to the final showdown on the Mississippi River in Louisiana. As each problem seems to be solved, larger and more dangerous events occur, such as the seemingly unexplainable smuggling of thousands of illegal Chinese immigrants. Our hero finds himself trapped with these poor, abused refugees who are about to be murdered. Each turn and twist continues to build anxiety and heighten suspense. The eye-catching cover of this novel should entice readers to open its pages, where they will soon find themselves engrossed in this enthralling adventure.?Anita Short, W. T. Woodson High School, Fairfax, VA
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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AS IF SHE WERE STRUGGLING out of a bottomless pit, consciousness slowly returned to Ling T'ai. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Keith Hunt on Jan. 8 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
A ship carrying priceless Chinese art treasures sinks in a storm in 1948. Decades later, locating this lost ship becomes one of the goals of a super-rich, greedy Chinaman. In walks the infallible super wonder, Dirk Pitt. He just happens upon one of the many dastardly deeds that super greedy evil Chinaman is doing in efforts to amass his immeasurable fortune: the smuggling and enslavement of Chinese immigrants to America. Pitt saves the day by fouling and exposing his smuggling operation and beating the rich, evil scumbag to the location of the lost ship.
Dear reader will recognize a predictably formulaic Cussler story, but nonetheless enjoy it, as he has all his other creations. They are a consistent source of non-stop action and adventure! There is never a straight line of chaos in a Cussler story. There always seems to be a multitude of misdeeds going on all at once. Flood Tide remains consistent, since Dirk Pitt manages to play a hand in the corruption of all these dirty deeds and save the day. It is quite an enjoyable story.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By David W. Nicholas on Sept. 29 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Maybe I'm getting jaded. I used to like these novels back some time ago, with the silly preposterous chases and the historical settings and artifacts. You get everything from a battleship turned into a monument turning its guns on the capital to the ghost of a WW1 flying ace strafing a U.S. Air Force base and getting revenge. I mean everything. The main character is a cross between Jacques Cousteau and Indiana Jones, except he has more sex appeal than James Bond. Everything's always very lurid, with the hero (Dirk Pitt) getting horribly upset and desiring revenge at the expense of the villain.
The plot doesn't make much sense, or really matter that much. In this instance, Pitt's vacationing at a lake in Oregon when a billionaire Chinese lunatic tries to use the lake as a dumping ground for useless illegal Chinese immigrants (I kid you not) and of course Pitt rescues them. It turns out that the government wants Pitt and his team to explore the billionaire's operations (by one of Cussler's patented preposterous coincidences) and so off we go.
There are many adventurous things in this book, chases involving boats, cars, submarines, ultralight gliders, and so forth. Gunfire and sex abound (though the sex is tastefully done, I will say that) and the humor is kind of lame.
If you're into this sort of thing I suppose this was fun. Somehow, I think I've reached my threshhold of disbelief.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By "gseattle" on Jan. 25 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is another of Clive Cussler's Dirk Pitt novels. While not fine reading, it is extremely entertaining. All the Dirk Pitt novels follow the same basic storyline, but that doesn't mean you know how Dirk will solve the mystery or defeat the bad guy (which he always does)!
This story starts out (after the chapter describing a scene from the past that figures into the culmination of the book) with Pitt vacationing on a small lake in Washington State (I especially like that since I am a native Washingtonian). Immediately he is pulled into trying to discover the secret behind a Chinese shipping mogul's secret resort. After finding the lakebed is covered with dead bodies, Pitt predictably tries to find the answer to the mystery. This only pulls him in deeper and he ends up rescuing the heroin of the story, an INS agent posing as an illegal Chinese immigrant who is destined for the bottom on the lake.
Through many twists and turns (literally) and close calls, Dirk and Julia (the INS agent) end up breaking the smuggling ring, solving the mystery of lost treasure, and destroying the "bad guy." What more could you ask for?
For light reading that gets you away from reality and even gives you a laugh sometimes it's a great book. If you're looking for serious reading I wouldn't recommend it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Joe Zika on Sept. 11 2002
Format: Hardcover
Flood Tide written by Clive Cussler is the fourteenth in the series of Dirk Pitt adventure novels. Dirk Pitt being the legendary hero who seems to stumble into this adventure as we are taken on a wild ride of adventure and intrigue from Washington State to Louisiana.
The villian in this book is a smuggler. A smuggler of human lives to anywhere on the globe he can make a profit. Cussler works in some intricately plotted suspense and some jingoistic slurs that if you can bear aren't too bad. But, if they were missing it would be better.
As the plot thickens, Pitt goes from the high seas to the Mississippi River trying to figure out just how this smuggler gets his contraband cargo in to port. Of course, what good Cussler adventure doesn't have some treasure hidden somewhere as a subplot. Well, this has a booty that is very suprising. Set in 1949 when Chiang Kai-shek is leaving the Chinese mainland.
Cussler's masterful storytelling, with the main plot and intricately woven subplots bringing the adventure to a fever pitch. The villian is a formidable crafty survivor and Pitt has his hands full with this adventure. Of course, all of the supporting personel from NUMA are at Pitt's disposal spicing the story just right.
The story moves quickly as the narrative is straight forward and to the point. The dialog between Pitt and his trusty partner Al Giordino is classic Cussler. I enjoyed this novel as it was entertaining with adventure and intriguing. You will be caught early in this engrossing book and won't be disengaged until the end.
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