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Footnote [Blu-ray] (Sous-titres français)


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Product Details

  • Actors: Shlomo Bar-Aba, Lior Ashkenazi, Aliza Rosen, Alma Zack, Micah Lewensohn
  • Directors: Joseph Cedar
  • Writers: Joseph Cedar
  • Producers: Joseph Cedar, David Mandil, Leon Edery, Michal Graidy, Moshe Edery
  • Format: AC-3, Dolby, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: Hebrew
  • Subtitles: English, French, Spanish
  • Dubbed: Portuguese
  • Subtitles for the Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: Region A/1
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Canadian Home Video Rating : Parental Guidance (PG)
  • Studio: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
  • Release Date: July 24 2012
  • Run Time: 103 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00772HQX8
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #39,858 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

Amazon.ca

Go figure that a movie about scholarly research can pack such a wallop of dramedic pizzazz and entertaining formal flourish in its examination of the arcana of academe and the mysteries of familial competition. Though it's packed with subtextual meaning on any number of levels, the title of this Israeli import and 2011 foreign language Oscar nominee is also a reference to the only claim to fame of Eliezer Shkolnik (Shlomo Bar Aba). The cranky, crotchety, and exceptionally old-fashioned professor of Talmudic studies at Jerusalem's Hebrew University has all but perished after not having published despite his relentless examination of obscure texts as a fanatical philologist. His lifelong quest into pure research was usurped by a jealous colleague years earlier, and Eliezer has only one reference to his name: a footnote in the work of a long-dead academic idol. Yet he clings to his old-school approach to intellectual investigation with greater gusto as his final years tick by. His rival in scholarly pursuit is his son Uriel (Lior Ashkenazi), an equally serious man who also teaches at the university, but whose flashy, more populous approach to Talmudic study has earned him wide acclaim. The fact that he's authored so many well-liked books is confirmation to Eliezer that his son's methods and expertise are the antithesis of everything to which the elder Shkolnik has devoted himself for decades. When a mix-up occurs over which Shkolnik is to be awarded a prestigious academic prize, father and son exchange more cerebral bites, provoking barks of laughter from the audience as the mistake complicates itself so unpredictably. Writer-director Joseph Cedar navigates the sea of intellectual and family discord with a genuinely droll touch that's as smart and stinging as it is funny. Using an array of zingy stylistic splashes like time-shifting flashbacks, disarming compositions, fleeting fantasy sequences, lively and often bombastic musical cues, eye-grabbing graphical elements, and clever visual digressions that come across as their own footnotes, Cedar lets loose lots of surprises that reveal the characters' complex inner conflicts. The best scene plays out in a miniscule office crowded with books and way more people than the space was meant to hold, where controversy is exposed and the intrigue behind motivations develops in a combination of near-slapstick comedy and palpable suspense. The acting is terrific, from the antihero dynamic between father and son to sideline players in the ensemble cast that includes wives, children, collaborators, and the security personnel who are a constant presence everywhere anyone goes. Footnote is a satire of intellect and domestic friction that cuts deep with dramatic tension and the insight of its often magical realist sense of high farce. --Ted Fry

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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
There's lots going on screen between father and son. In life too, but this film has it by the boatloads. So much so that it sometimes gives the feature an, at times, unnecessary weight. Its ending may also be a bit hard to digest for more mainstream audiences used to the formula of "let's wrap this movie all nice and pretty" because there really isn't an ending. Or at least it doesn't seem like it. It's left to the imagination of the viewer, and it can take MANY shapes depending on what mood you're in.

The rest of the picture is very well done with a superb score reminiscent of joyous yet calmer John Williams works, the acting is well crafted and the direction seems quite impeccable. In fact, the Hebrew context may be what's the most striking. I don't think I would have liked the movie as much had it been done by a US crew.

A father/son tale as old as time itself, that doesn't redefine the wheel, but certainly entertains, touches, frustrates and makes you even question your own relationship with your siblings... all with a powerful yet simple case of "mistaken identity"... I'm very happy I bought it because it'll be re-watched and analyzed even further.
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By Richard on Jan. 10 2014
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
The story is very good and it illustrates an age-old competition between father and son. Unfortunately, the directing and editing pretty much destroyed the film. Scenes which should have gone longer are abruptly cut off almost mid-sentence and I was left wondering where they would have gone. Other scenes drag on for so long and move so slowly that I had to check to make sure I hadn't accidentally paused it. There is only one good scene with great dialogue and actual emotion. I liked the story but the film was very badly put together.
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By Jim Smith on Jan. 6 2014
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
Great acting performances from the lead gentlemen for this father/son duel that could stand true for any family.
Incredible moments throughout the film, some for specifically Israeli audiences and others that work for anyone.

Blu-ray extras were plentiful and somewhat gratifying. English subtitles above average.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 43 reviews
32 of 35 people found the following review helpful
outstanding Israeli character study and family drama April 14 2012
By Paul Allaer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
"Footnote" (107 min.) is a 2011 movie out of Israel. It brings the rather complicated but intruiging story of a father and son who both are scholars and researchers at the Talmud Department of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. As it happens, the son is actually more successful and the movie starts out with the son's acceptance speech upon getting elected into the Israeli Academy of Science and Humanities. Remarkably, we don't actually see the son but instead the camera focuses the entire sequence (probably 3-4 min.) only on the father, who seemingly is shell-shocked and/or confused and/or resentful at the ever-growing successes of his son. Then, about 30 min. into the movie, the father gets the call from the Israeli Department of Education that he'd been waiting to get for 20 years: he's been chosen to receive the prestigious Israeli Prize. Happiness turns to potential disaster when the son gets called by the Israeli Prize Committee the very next day with the bombshell that due to a clerical error, it was he who had been chosen for the Israeli Prize, not his dad!

I don't want to spoil more from the plot, and the movie then really takes off and you'll just have to see for yourself how it all plays out. The movie offers an excellent character sturdy of both father and son, looking at it from both a generational perspective as well as a scholary difference in how each is doing research.

This movie was one of the 5 nominees for this year's Oscar for Best Foreign Movie (Iran's "A Separation" won the Oscar), and rightfully so. This is the complete antitode to Hollywood's mainstream fare such as "John Carter" or "Wrath of the Titans" in that it is an intellectually challenging movie. The lead performances of Shlomo Bar Aba as the father and Lior Ashkenazi as the son are nothing short of outstanding. I was pleasantly surprised to see how many people were in the theatre when I saw the movie this weekend here in Cincinnati, giving me hope thia may reach a wider audience. Meanwhile, "Footnote" is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!
18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
Very fine film - only flaw is an unsatisfying ending April 29 2012
By Andres C. Salama - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
This bittersweet comedy from Israeli is set in the rarefied world of academia and is a fine, interesting movie about the bitter relationship between a father and a son who both happen to be Talmudic scholars working at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and how their rivalry finally overcomes their filial obligations.

Eliezer Shkolnik (a terrific performance by Shlomo Bar Aba) is the father, and he seems a personification of male old age grumpiness. He looks at the at the rest of his colleagues with an insufferable air of intellectual superiority, and believes he hasn't been recognized to the extent that he deserves, yet the movie hints he is a bit of a fraud himself, his main claim to academic fame is having been thanked in a footnote in a book by a famous Talmudic authority. The more successful Uriel (Lior Ashkenazi, who usually plays young macho men, but here plays a middle aged academic against type), is the son. The film lampoons him for being a lightweight scholar and for being too attracted to the media spotlight, yet he seems to be the more psychologically rounded of the two. The tense relationship between father and son finally comes to a bitter confrontation when the elder Shkolnik is mistakenly awarded an important academic prize that was meant for the son (I'm not going to reveal anything else about the plot).

I'm also obviously not going to reveal the ending but it seems underwhelming and unrealized, as if the director Joseph Cedar didn't knew how to end the movie. Thus, what was a fine film until then ends in a curiously unsatisfying way. Nevertheless, this is a fine movie with many great scenes. I especially liked two scenes: one is set in a small but packed conference room and ends when one academic shoves another to the wall. In the second scene, a very pretty female journalist goes to the home of the elder Shkolnik to interview him and manages to get him to say very nasty things about his son.
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Role Reversal and Time Lapse Aug. 4 2012
By Grady Harp - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
FOOTNOTE is an appropriately titled sparklingly intelligent and entertaining film written and directed by Joseph Cedar. With a small cast and a focused story this little film form Israel is not only a pleasure to watch as a story performed as shared by brilliant actors, but it is also one of the most visually artistic and creative venture of cinematography to be on the small screen in a long time: the genius cinematographer is Yaron Scharf. Add to this a musical score that enhances every moment of the story - courtesy of composer Amit Poznansky - and the film simply succeeds on every level.

In a most ingenious way we are introduced to the two main characters - father and son, both professors in the Talmud department of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. The film opens on the confused and somewhat unattached facial expression of the seated father Eliezer Shkolnik (Shlomo Bar Aba) as he listens to his ebullient son Uriel Shkolnik (Lior Ashkenazi) being inducted into the prestigious Israeli academic union. Uriel's acceptance speech reflects his childhood when his father informed him upon questioning that he was a `teacher' - an occupation the young Uriel found embarrassing at the time, but now honors his father for this guidance. After the ceremony we slowly discover that there is a long-standing rivalry between father and son. Uriel has an addictive dependency on the embrace and accolades that the establishment provides, while Eliezer is a stubborn purist with a fear and profound revulsion for what the establishment stands for, yet beneath his contempt lies a desperate thirst for some kind of recognition: his only clam to fame after long years of intensive research is that the man who published his findings mentions Eliezer in a footnote. When it comes times for the Israel Prize, Israel's most prestigious national award, to be awarded, a clerical error results in a telephone call informing Eliezer that he has won, while in reality the award was meant for his son Uriel. How this error is resolved open all manner of windows for examining family relationships, fame, pure academia, and forgiveness.

The film is an unqualified success. Lior Ashkenazi (so well remembered from `Walk on Water' and `Late Marriage' among others) gives a bravura performance and that of Shlomo Ben Aba balances it in quality. The supporting cast is strong. Joseph Cedar has produced a fine film very much enhanced by the brilliance of the cinematography that tells the story as much as the dialogue. Grady Harp, August 12
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Joseph Cedar's "Footnote" is indeed bittersweet, thought provoking and for the most part, clever and compelling. Nov. 29 2012
By Dennis A. Amith (kndy) - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Blu-ray
In 2011, director/writer Joseph Cedar ("Ha-Hesder", "Campfire", "Beaufort") released his film "Footnote" starring Lior Ashkenazi and Shlomo Bar-Aba.

A film about a troubled family relationship between father and son who both teach at the Talmud department of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. A school which Joseph Cedar studied philosophy and history before graduating New York University's film school.

The film would win the "Best Screenplay Award" at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival, win nine prizes at the 2011 Ophir Awards and would become the official entry from Israel for the 84th Academy Awards for Best Foreign Language Film.

VIDEO:

"Footnote" is presented in 1080p High Definition (2:35:1 Aspect Ratio). Picture quality for "Footnote" is excellent with amazing detail and clarity, especially of the closeups of the cast, the use of colors and the really good positioning of characters and lighting, "Footnote" looks great on Blu-ray!

During my viewing, I didn't notice any artifacts or banding. If anything, "Footnote" is another film from Sony Pictures Classics that looks awesome on Blu-ray!

AUDIO & SUBTITLES:

"Footnote" is presented in Hebrew, Portuguese 5.1 DTS-HD MA. The film is primarily dialogue driven. There are moments of crowd ambiance through the surround channels, but for the most part, this film is dialogue and music and is center-channel and front channel driven and lossless audio is crystal clear!

Subtitles are in English, Spanish, French and Portuguese.

SPECIAL FEATURES

"Footnote" comes with the following special features:

Behind the Scenes of Joseph Cedar's Film: Footnote - (24:00) Featuring the making of "Footnote" with behind-the-scenes footage.
An Evening with Joseph Cedar - (9:35) A live Q&A with director/writer Joseph Cedar.
Theatrical Trailer - (1:58) Theatrical trailer for "Footnote".

JUDGMENT CALL:

"Footnote" is a very smart and clever film. And the film no doubt spotlights on the conundrum between father and son and problem of father receiving an award meant for the son, and the son having to break the news to him.

Director and writer Joseph Cedar manages to take these two individuals, who are literally complete opposites but yet are blood related and gives us somewhat of a comedic take, especially when revolving around Eliezer. A Narcissistic individual that seems very bitter that his son has achieved grand success for his type of research, that goes everything against what Eliezer believes in.

But where the film becomes quite exciting is to see Uriel, a man who has accomplished so much but a man who cares for his father, despite the father not exactly doing the same for him. Uriel defends his father against his rival but at the same time, the more he looks into his father's work, he realizes that his work is not that good and therefore, his peers have not supported him.

While Uriel has received many accolades for his work, his father has nothing but a footnote. And the film revolves around this problematic situation of how Uriel will respond to the error of his father being given the Israel Prize. A prize that Uriel and his father have both dreamed of having.

But it's a double-edge sword with an unfortunate twist which may leave those viewing this film, fulfilled or unfulfilled, depending on which character you sympathize for.

I enjoyed "Footnote" because of Joseph Cedar's clever and really smart writing. The film does showcase how things are behind-the-scenes among scholars, especially when it comes to voting for a prize of who is worthy, who isn't and blocking individuals from awards due to spite.

While the film does feature Talmudic teachings, one is not expected to be an erudite to comprehend Jewish culture, if anything, anyone can understand strained relations between father and son but also the importance of family.

While the acting by Lior Ashkenzi and Shlomo Bar-Aba are wonderful, it's the attention to detail of Joseph Cedar's screenplay that captivates your attention. Cedar is specific on details and to help balance the film is the cinematography of Yaron Scharf. Scharf was able to capture the conflict and together, both men achieve efficacy because it is a film that not only is a comedy, but spotlights on conflict and an intriguing twist, that spotlights on the conflict.

Without spoiling the ending of the film, the ending of the film will surely leave viewers feeling content or disappointed.

Joseph Cedar's "Footnote" is indeed bittersweet, thought provoking and for the most part, clever and compelling. Recommended!
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Heharat Shulaim/Footnote Aug. 4 2012
By Grady Harp - Published on Amazon.com
FOOTNOTE (HEHARAT SHULAIM in Hebrew) is an appropriately titled sparklingly intelligent and entertaining film written and directed by Joseph Cedar. With a small cast and a focused story this little film form Israel is not only a pleasure to watch as a story performed as shared by brilliant actors, but it is also one of the most visually artistic and creative venture of cinematography to be on the small screen in a long time: the genius cinematographer is Yaron Scharf. Add to this a musical score that enhances every moment of the story - courtesy of composer Amit Poznansky - and the film simply succeeds on every level.

In a most ingenious way we are introduced to the two main characters - father and son, both professors in the Talmud department of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. The film opens on the confused and somewhat unattached facial expression of the seated father Eliezer Shkolnik (Shlomo Bar Aba) as he listens to his ebullient son Uriel Shkolnik (Lior Ashkenazi) being inducted into the prestigious Israeli academic union. Uriel's acceptance speech reflects his childhood when his father informed him upon questioning that he was a `teacher' - an occupation the young Uriel found embarrassing at the time, but now honors his father for this guidance. After the ceremony we slowly discover that there is a long-standing rivalry between father and son. Uriel has an addictive dependency on the embrace and accolades that the establishment provides, while Eliezer is a stubborn purist with a fear and profound revulsion for what the establishment stands for, yet beneath his contempt lies a desperate thirst for some kind of recognition: his only clam to fame after long years of intensive research is that the man who published his findings mentions Eliezer in a footnote. When it comes times for the Israel Prize, Israel's most prestigious national award, to be awarded, a clerical error results in a telephone call informing Eliezer that he has won, while in reality the award was meant for his son Uriel. How this error is resolved open all manner of windows for examining family relationships, fame, pure academia, and forgiveness.

The film is an unqualified success. Lior Ashkenazi (so well remembered from `Walk on Water' and `Late Marriage' among others) gives a bravura performance and that of Shlomo Ben Aba balances it in quality. The supporting cast is strong. Joseph Cedar has produced a fine film very much enhanced by the brilliance of the cinematography that tells the story as much as the dialogue. In Hebrew with English subtitles. Grady Harp, August 12


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