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Footprint South American Handbook 2001 Paperback – Nov 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Passport Books (November 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0658011545
  • ISBN-13: 978-0658011542
  • Product Dimensions: 20.8 x 12.4 x 4.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 862 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #3,179,450 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By fdoamerica on Sept. 9 2002
Format: Paperback
I have only been in five of the fourteen countries covered in this handbook, but of those I have travel through, I found this all-in-one guide to be succinct, reliable and valuable. That said, it does not replace the comprehensiveness of a specific country guide. Basically, this handbook is a digested compilation of the specific country handbooks that Footprint produces. Thus, if you are only visiting one or two countries, buy those handbooks. If you are going to explore South America and want only one guide, this guide will be valuable.
Each country section is condensed, comprehensive and reliable. Though smaller towns will be omitted, the most important cities, towns and sites will be covered. Each country has been segmented into regions, as noted by the country's map, and within each region Footprint covers the top two, three or four cities or towns in a region. Basic travel information is given at the beginning of each country.
As with all Footprint Handbooks this guide has excellent color maps. In the back of the guide you will find ... exceptional color maps of South America. Also, throughout the book, I found the b&w maps of regions and cities to be very good.
Another impressive aspect of this guide is found at the beginning, in the 'Essentials' section, where there is a very good discussion of bringing and using a car/SUV throughout South America. This section also includes information on motorcycling and a section on cycling throughout South America.
Though each country section does have a 'futher reading & useful websites' section, this is very basic. The section on health/vaccination is bare bone basic.
On the "downside" I often found that the brevity of the restaurant and lodging remarks were so terse (or no remarks at all) that they were not helpful, i.e.,.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Excellent!| March 15 2001
By Ron Mader - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
From Planeta Journal - The Handbook looks better than ever. This new edition of the South America guide provides reliable information about general tourism as well profiles of national parks and reserves. Of special note is the "Responsible Tourism" essay that the book pioneered in 1992. This is a terrific guide. The format is easy to follow. Colorful pictures and maps compliment the text. Highly recommended.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
The information is current and reliable... valuable guide. Sept. 9 2002
By fdoamerica - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I have only been in five of the fourteen countries covered in this handbook, but of those I have travel through, I found this all-in-one guide to be succinct, reliable and valuable. That said, it does not replace the comprehensiveness of a specific country guide. Basically, this handbook is a digested compilation of the specific country handbooks that Footprint produces. Thus, if you are only visiting one or two countries, buy those handbooks. If you are going to explore South America and want only one guide, this guide will be valuable.
Each country section is condensed, comprehensive and reliable. Though smaller towns will be omitted, the most important cities, towns and sites will be covered. Each country has been segmented into regions, as noted by the country's map, and within each region Footprint covers the top two, three or four cities or towns in a region. Basic travel information is given at the beginning of each country.
As with all Footprint Handbooks this guide has excellent color maps. In the back of the guide you will find ... exceptional color maps of South America. Also, throughout the book, I found the b&w maps of regions and cities to be very good.
Another impressive aspect of this guide is found at the beginning, in the 'Essentials' section, where there is a very good discussion of bringing and using a car/SUV throughout South America. This section also includes information on motorcycling and a section on cycling throughout South America.
Though each country section does have a 'futher reading & useful websites' section, this is very basic. The section on health/vaccination is bare bone basic.
On the "downside" I often found that the brevity of the restaurant and lodging remarks were so terse (or no remarks at all) that they were not helpful, i.e.,. Hotel Barros Arana (Chile):modern, or a restaurant remark: good not cheap, or a hostel: helpful. Also I find the intrusive paid advertisements for hotels, tour companies, hostels, calling cards and travel
services throughout the book (a half-page, a full-page, a quarter page) offensive. The purchase ... should be more than enough to make a profit, but Footprint chooses to afflict its readers with uninvited advertising to increase its profits.
For those using glasses, the small type that the publishers uses will cause you to strain to read in low or poorly lighted areas. Also, the pricing for accommodations is a cumbersome rating system that could be simplified. It is not user friendly. There is no pricing guide for restaurants.
That said, this is an adequate, to good, guide for those who are going to visit a multitude of countries while in South America. The information is current and reliable. Especially recommended for those that plan to motor through South America. Recommended
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
S. America Handbooks Nov. 13 2000
By Colleen B - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I just spent 5 months in all the s. american countries except the norhternmost 3-4. Both the lonely plantet and footprints came in handy however I ultimately found Footprints to be more informative and to the point. Most other travelers agreed with me. The lonely planet had one advantage in that it's maps were better. Bottom line, if your are backpacking, take Footprints. If you have lots of space, take them both. Happy trails. edwardhillmann@hotmail.com
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
The best for S. America June 10 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I'm not sure, but I get the impression that Mr. Gillies has not used the Lonely Planet as well as Footprint in practice. Having returned from SA in April and having taken both I can say that Footprint is far, far better and very much more up to date. It is sad, considering I live in the city where LP is published.

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