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For A Few Dollars More Blu Ray [Blu-ray]


List Price: CDN$ 16.99
Price: CDN$ 9.93 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Frequently Bought Together

For A Few Dollars More Blu Ray [Blu-ray] + Fistful Of Dollars (Bilingual) [Blu-ray] + Once Upon A Time in the West [Blu-ray] (Bilingual)
Price For All Three: CDN$ 31.92

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Product Details

  • Format: NTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: English, Spanish
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French
  • Dubbed: Spanish
  • Region: Region A/1
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: R
  • Studio: MGM Canada
  • Release Date: Aug. 2 2011
  • Run Time: 133 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (59 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B004IZVDBI
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #7,002 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

Amazon.ca

A ringing instance of a sequel far outstripping its predecessor, Sergio Leone's For a Few Dollars More takes the lethal antihero from A Fistful of Dollars, gives him both a rival and an adversary worthy of sharing a gun-blazing corrida, and ratchets up the stylization to something approaching grandeur. This time the Man with No Name (Clint Eastwood) is a bounty hunter whose desert Southwest killing ground is suddenly crowded by the presence of an older, black-clad shootist (Lee Van Cleef). Individually and together, they terminate sundry grotesques while closing in on their biggest quarry, a memorably insane bandit called El Indio (Gian Maria Volonté is brilliant). There's just enough plot to imbue Van Cleef with genuine mystery, a dark avenging angel from a lost past whose pull would supply the emotional core of Leone's later masterworks Once upon a Time in the West and Once upon a Time in America. Leone's bravura widescreen compositions are breathtaking, and Ennio Morricone's music score--tinged with lunatic religiosity--is his first great one. --Richard T. Jameson

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Bliggick on June 17 2004
Format: DVD
Most people reading these reviews already know how great these Eastwood - Leone spaghetti westerns are, so I won't talk about the film itself here. I enjoyed this movie when I first bought it on VHS in 1989 but always hated the brittle, tinny sound, the opening theme music was excrutiating, when we all know that Morricone's soundtracks for these movies was excellent. So here it is in 2004 and I've got the $10 DVD and nothing has improved in the sound. Also the torture scene is missing a few seconds at the end where one of the gang asks Indio: "Why let 'em live?" and he replies: "All in due time". Hmm, let me make a wild guess here: MGM will finally fix this movie the way they should have for the first DVD but it will come out in a "Special Edition" 2-disc set with a bunch of extras for $25 (think The Great Escape here). You know those "Proof of Purchase" UPC's you see on the back of the DVD case? Just once I'd like to see MGM offer a rebate on a new "Special Edition" via a P.O.P. from an earlier DVD version. That's why I'm glad I don't have the first DVD of "The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly" already and that's why I won't yet buy John Wayne's "The Alamo". Unfortunately I already bought MGM's DVD of "It's A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World", another sub-standard MGM DVD release.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mark on May 25 2004
Format: DVD
Along with The Good The Bad and The Ugly, and Once Upon A Time In The West, this is a western masterpiece and one of the best ever made. While not as polished as the above mentioned, For A Few Dollars More contains some of the best scenes in the history of westerns. Col. Mortimer gunning down Guy Callaway, Clint riding in to Aqua Caliente alone, and my favorite, Mortimer lighting a match on Wild's suspenders. Like GBU, I have seen this movie at least a hundred times, and have enjoyed it since I was a 7th grader. A classic western in the Italian style, boasts a superb soundtrack to boot.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By "mandalorian19" on June 25 2004
Format: DVD
This time for a few dollars more,the story revolves around a new bounty hunter called angel eyes,CLint returns and is not as comical as he was in the first.I think he's showing us that he has become more of a serious bounty hunter since he got messed up in fistful.LEE van Cleef is on a revenge mission while eastwood is playing angel eyes and the bandits for a few dollars more.It's worth owning,so is the score.thanks
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Format: DVD
bucking the trend of other reviews, i would say that this is the
weakest of the trilogy
GB&U has the epic scope and a monumental story spread over an
agreeably long film. fistful is a remake of yojimbo, but done
competently enough, and the freshness of the character and the
new style that it heralded, make it a memorable event
but a few dollars more suffers from a number of sequel problems;
clint's character is not evolved far in this; instead, the
character development is left for the van cleef character
of course, using a number of the same actors from the first
film always manages to confuse (given that this is a sequel
but the main problem with this episode in the series is that the
violence just becomes overdone. in place of the relatively
few actual shoot-outs in the first, this one has an almost
continual stream of people falling to the guns of the two leads.
the repetitiveness of it becomes tedious
but, as part of a truely novel series, this film is still worthy
of watching
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Format: DVD
For a Few Dollars More is the second in Sergio Leone's Dollars trilogy and many believe the best of the three. The story centers around two bounty hunters who are hunting down a notorious outlaw band led by El Indio. The two unwilling partners work from the inside of the gang after a successful bank robbery in El Paso. This is one of the first buddy films that puts two very different people into a rough situation. This should be the perfect example of what a spaghetti western should be. The perfect anti-hero, a sneering older rival, a huge gang made up of spaghetti regulars, great gunfights, and another exceptional soundtrack by Ennio Morricone. How can you go wrong?
Clint Eastwood reprises his role as the Man with No Name although he is referred to as Manco in this role. The part is better than in a Fistful of Dollars and right up there with The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly. Lee Van Cleef plays the role of Colonel Mortimer, the bounty hunter who teams up with Eastwood to track down the notorious gang. There is a mystery about why he is hunting down the gang that is revealed late in the movie. Gina Maria Volonte must be mentioned as the sadistic, marijuana smoking gang leader El Indio. His villain is still one of the best in the spaghetti genre. The rest of the cast included Mara Krup, Luigi Pistilli, Mario Brega, Aldo Sambrell, Benito Stefanelli, Panos Papadopulos, and Klaus Kinski as the crazed hunchbacked gunfighter. The DVD is very good with an informative booklet included, widescreen presentation that looks great, and theatrical trailer all there. Well worth it for such a classic western!
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Format: DVD
Federico Fellini is often credited as "the Greatest Italian Director." For me, however, Sergio Leone earned those laurels. More than deSica or Fellini, Leone's movies were Italian to the core: Grandiose, operatic, melodramatic, full of vendetta and vengeance. The irony is that Leone's most memorable movies took place not in Rome, the Abruzzi mountains or Sicily, but in the Old West.
With his epic "Once Upon a Time in the West" and "The Man With No Name" trilogy, Leone not only resuscitated the Western genre, but set a new standard. His first Western, "A Fistful of Dollars," was basically a retelling of Akira Kurosawa's "Yojimbo"; a Samurai tale transplanted south of the border in old Mexico. With "For a Few Dollars More," Leone really opens up as a screenwriter and director. Gone is the claustrophobic town of "Fistful," replaced by the full sweep of the great American Southwest (for which the drier regions of Spain provide a reasonable facsimile for those of us who know that Tucumcari is hardly so dry and El Paso nary as mountainous).
Leone also begins staking out his territory as director with this one, too. "For a Few Dollars More" bears more traces of Cecil B. deMille than Kurosawa, as Leone starts trending toward an epic production that reaches full fruition in "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly" and "Once Upon A Time in the West." However, Leone's *style* of Western could never be confused with John Ford -- rather, it hearkens back to the more violent moments found in Westerns such as "Winchester '73" (Anthony Mann), "High Noon" (Fred Zinnemann) and "Rio Bravo" (Howard Hawks), and looks forward to the gritty, realistic violence from directors influenced by Leone, such as Sam Peckinpah, Francis Ford Coppola and Martin Scorsese.
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