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For One More Day Paperback – Apr 1 2008


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For One More Day + The Five People You Meet in Heaven + Have a Little Faith: A True Story
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Hachette Books; Reprint edition (April 1 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401309577
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401309572
  • Product Dimensions: 12.1 x 1.3 x 17.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 181 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #4,499 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

In this second novel from Tuesdays with Morrie and The Five People You Meet in Heaven author Albom, grief-stricken Charles "Chick" Benetto goes into an alcoholic tailspin when his always-attentive mother, Pauline, dies. Framed as an "as told to" story, Chick quickly narrates her funeral; his drink-fueled loss of savings, job ("sales") and family; and his descent into loneliness and isolation. After a suicide attempt, Chick encounters Pauline's ghost. Together, the two revisit Pauline's travails raising her children alone after his father abandons them: she braves the town's disapproval of her divorce and works at a beauty parlor, taking an extra job to put money aside for the children's education. Pauline cringes at the heartache Chick inflicted as a demanding child, obnoxious teen and brusque, oblivious adult chasing the will-o'-the-wisp of a baseball career. Through their story, Albom foregrounds family sanctity, maternal self-sacrifice and the destructive power of personal ambition and male self-involvement. He wields pathos as if it were a Louisville Slugger—shoveling dirt into Pauline's grave, Chick hears her spirit cry out, " 'Oh, Charley. How could you?' "—but Albom often strikes a nerve on his way to the heart. (Sept. 26)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"An eloquent debate pitting human and animal rights against each other is both informative and moving as this murder mystery/love story/environmental thriller weaves its uncommon spell. Deftly drawn characterizations, from the admirable to the loathsome, and an engrossing journalistic format are two of the many strong points that make this timely and compelling novel a winner."--Publishers Weekly
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Cheryl Tardif on Dec 24 2006
Format: Hardcover
I was totally absorbed by For One More Day by Mitch Albom, and taken back to a time when I, too, was young and everything seemed innocent, confusing and not always explainable. I highly recommend this read, but be prepared--you'll need a box of Kleenex at your side!

Charles "Chick" Benetto has reached the end of his rope, so to speak. He is divorced and has a daughter who won't invite him to her wedding, a father who walked out on the family years ago and a mother who is dead. Chick is a washout as a baseball player and finds solace in one thing--alcohol.

Feeling that he has nothing left to live for, nothing to hold onto, he plots his suicide and returns to his family home where he finds it not as empty as it should be. Through his mother's spirit, Chick learns that things weren't always as they seemed. He asks questions about his life, about his father, and is surprised by some of the answers. Some of the conversations are bittersweet and sad, while others will make you laugh.

A cross between A Christmas Carol and Ghost, this is a beautifully wrought story that delves into the human psyche and into our yearning to go back and change things--if we had just one more day. For everyone who always wanted to go back in time, take back nasty words or find a sense of understanding, For One More Day is an emotional tribute to family bonds, love and forgiveness. One of Mitch Albom's finest works! This novel is that one last chance to see things as they were--and to make things right. Don't we all wish we had that?

[.....]
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Torval Mork TOP 500 REVIEWER on Jan. 15 2007
Format: Hardcover
I was given this book by as a gift, having heard of it, but not having mentioned wanting to read it. As an uninitiated Albom reader, I was amazed at his ability to quickly draw the reader in to the plight of the main character, Charley "Chick" Benetto. The first paragraph had me hooked, and within the first few pages I was immersed in his story of despair. I think that anyone worth their salt will share in his feelings of regret as he expresses the mistakes he's made in his life. One's childhood relationship with their mother, in retrospect, has many opportunities to go one way or the other, and in Chick's case, his is marred by his father's constant refrain "You can be a mother's boy - or a father's boy, but you can't be both" - a decision that no child should have to face. In his desire to please his father, he therefore alienates his mother, leading to a build-up of guilt and self-loathing that serve as a minefield over which he walks continuously in relationships to come. Though his mother has passed on, through a series of events beginning with his attempted suicide, he is given one more day to spend with his mother. He learns of her side of their relationship, and the extreme travails she faced and through which she persevered to give him the best life possible. Despite the short length of this book, there are a few twists and turns that really give this story a interesting and unpredictable path - right to the end I might add!

Mitch Albom's storytelling is absolutely amazing, I look forward to delving into his back catalogue if this book is any reflection of his previous work. Highly recommended!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Dec 4 2006
Format: Hardcover
This kind and generous book is a mini version of The Five People You Meet in Heaven for revisiting your life to develop another perspective on it. In this case, Charley Benetto comes to see his mother through different eyes. A self-sacrificing woman, Pauline (Posey), had shielded Charley from all of the challenges their little family had faced. All that Charley knew was that his beloved Dad had moved out when Charley was young and didn't reappear in his life until his college years.

The set-up is pretty extreme. Charley goes to pieces after his mother dies. He drinks too much. He loses his money. He drives away his wife and daughter. He loses all his desire to live. Hitting bottom, Charley decides to kill himself. He heads back towards his old home town . . . and finds many surprises . . . including another day with his deceased mother.

The core of the book's appeal is the deft way that Mr. Albom captures the ambiguity many sons have towards the support they receive from their Mothers, while the Mothers are acting like the saints they often are. A good secondary appeal is the gradual exposure of deeply buried family secrets.

It's that latter point that I would like to address a little more. Families keep secrets from children for all kinds of good reasons. But children do become adults, and somewhere along the way the relationships will be improved if the secrets are revealed. You cannot hope to believe in Santa Claus all of your life in the same way you did as a five-year-old. If your parents are still alive (and I hope they will be for many years to come), think about what you don't understand about what they did when you were young. Ask them to tell you the answers. You'll all grow closer in the process.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By mocha on Nov. 16 2009
Format: Paperback
I thoroughly enjoyed this book (which I read in two sittings yesterday). I loved "Tuesdays with Morrie", but didn't think the author could come up with another story as good as that so had not read anything else by Mitch Albom. "One More Day" is about a mother's unconditional love, the kind of love we are not likely to find again. It's about people that are still in our hearts long after they have disappeared from our lives, and what it would be like to be able to be with each of them for one more day. It made me want to contact each of my old friends before one of us dies to sort through the misunderstandings, pain and regrets, to relive the happy memories, tell them that I still think of them, that I never stopped loving them, etc. I have done some of that over the last few years and it's amazing how differently each of us has thought about the same situations. Opening oneself up to some old wounds can help to lay down burdens as the passage of time reveals additional aspects, considerations, understandings. I wish I had written this little BIG book. It's an INSPIRATION.
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