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For Sale Enhanced


Price: CDN$ 21.09
Only 7 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by inandout_canada.
4 new from CDN$ 21.09 13 used from CDN$ 6.86

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Frequently Bought Together

For Sale + Please Please Me + With the Beatles
Price For All Three: CDN$ 41.09

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Jan. 1 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Enhanced
  • Label: EMI Music Canada
  • ASIN: B000002UAI
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (177 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #43,912 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. No Reply
2. I'm A Loser
3. Baby's In Black
4. Rock and Roll Music
5. I'll Follow The Sun
6. Mr. Moonlight
7. Medley: Kansas City/Hey, Hey, Hey, Hey
8. Eight Days A Week
9. Words Of Love
10. Honey Don't
11. Every Little Thing
12. I Don't Want To Spoil The Party
13. What You're Doing
14. Everybody's Trying To Be My Baby

Product Description

Product Description

180 Gram Single Jacket Remastered LP

Amazon.ca

Banged out in a hurry for the 1964 Christmas market, Beatles for Sale sometimes sounds it, loaded with ill-conceived covers and some of John Lennon's most self-loathing lyrics. On the other hand, the people doing the banging-out were the Beatles, whose instincts for what worked musically were so strong that they could basically do no wrong--any record that has "Baby's in Black", "I Don't Want to Spoil the Party" and the delectable "Eight Days a Week" on it is only "minor" in the most relative sense. And, though their voices had been frazzled a bit by constant touring, they revved them up for some joyous shouting, and indulged their fondness for American country in subtle, playful ways. --Douglas Wolk

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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By John Ballantyne on July 9 2004
Format: Audio CD
By the time that the Beatles recorded "Beatles For Sale", they were fed up. They had been constantly touring and they had just starred a feature film, and yet they were still under the demands of the record company for a new single every three months and a new album every six months. They could cope with this pressure for their previous two albums, but everyone has a breaking point, and so it's no surprise that it came right after the exhaustive "A Hard Day's Night", which they had filled with fourteen new originals as well as having made a movie. Having to follow that up would make any group, even the Beatles, falter slightly.
Critics and audiences alike have already noted the downsides to this pressure. Instead of giving us fourteen new originals like they did on "A Hard Day's Night", they "fill out" the album with covers of their favorite 50s artists. With the exception of particularly energetic performances of "Kansas City" and "Rock and Roll Music", these covers are stale and uninspired. They stick with the arrangement of the original recordings. (Indeed, their cover of "Words of Love" sounds so remarkably like Buddy Holly's original that some casual listeners may confuse the two!). It also must be noted that "Mr. Moonlight" is one of the Beatles most disliked tracks. So, it's no wonder that "Beatles For Sale" is one of their most disliked LP's.
Now, having said all that, this album is extraordinarily under-rated and under-appreciated. The pressure and stress had its benefits, too. John Lennon (and Paul, to be fair, but especially John) had been studying the weary songwriting of Bob Dylan and his strong use of lyrical value. The stress and pressure John was under gave him a perfect excuse to exercise his knowledge of this kind of songwriting.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By From the Musician's Pen TOP 50 REVIEWER on Oct. 11 2009
Format: Audio CD
I bought both the remastered stereo and mono box sets and am slowly comparing them, song by song, to the original 1987 CD releases. To read my other reviews, search the titles of other Beatles CDs.

The new pics and booklet and cool to see, but the paper cover will wear out eventually and won't be replaceable, like the old plastic CD covers were. The pictures have a different tinting compared to the original CD cover, and some older and some newer pictures are clearer to see. The new CD itself looks far cooler, with the Parlophone logo, etc. The original 1987 CDs were very "bare-bones" compared to these remastered releases.

However, it was easy to copy songs from the older CDs, to create my own Beatles mixed CDs. The new stereo CDs have a documentary, which prevents me from getting at the song tracks to copy them. While I hate people "stealing" this music for free, I have paid for my copies and feel I should be able to make copies for myself, especially since this sounds so much better than the 1987 version.

I had never realized that the 1987 CD was in mono until I did this comparison. I had thought that CD sounded good, but the remastering sounds so much better. The music is now louder, crisper, cleaner, punchier and clearer, etc. In creating new stereo mixes, instrumental parts are now panned left or right, usually keeping rhythm section together and lead parts in the opposite speaker. There is more bleeding of parts heard in the opposite speaker with reverb.

It sounds like the vocals were originally double-tracked, so one set of vocals is panned left or right (but it bleeds clearly to the opposite speaker with reverb) and the main vocal track is centered. Everything sounds great on the stereo CD.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Joel Bocko on June 18 2004
Format: Audio CD
They were on top of the world, but Beatlemania was taking its toll, as you can see on the cover, detect in the slightly cynical title, and hear in the songs...but you probably know that already. What's most amazing about this album is not the Beatles' decline (producer George Martin felt it was weak, as did some of the group) but their growth. This is a growing-up album if there every was one, and it's the closest the Beatles ever came to a breakup album too (well, maybe Abbey Road for obvious reasons). After the uncertain, depressed Lennon triumvirate of No Reply, I'm a Loser, and Baby's in Black (all great songs) the bouncy pep of Rock and Roll Music sounds less like the covers on their other LPs and more like nostalgia. And indeed, the overall mood here is bittersweet, a mixture of weariness, uncertainty, nostalgia, and romance, not the gleeful love or even the idealized angst of past Beatles songs, but a deeply romanticized, and also painful, yearning. Yesterday appeared on their next release, but it wouldn't have been so out of place here (though this time it's John not Paul who expresses loss). But when they're happy, they're happy, and Eight Days a Week is as joyful as any early Beatles song, but more sophisticated and stylized (dig the fade-in). And I'll Follow the Sun is the perfect song about yearning and dreaming, no less because it was written by a teenage Paul before he became famous; it may be the best song on the album. Beatles for Sale is melancholy but not bleak, musically sophisticated, with lots and lots of underrated songs. Listening to Mr. Moonlight again, I was surprised at the soul John pours into his singing; the song might be dismissed as filler, but there's something there.Read more ›
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