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Forbidden Archeology: The Full Unabridged Edition Hardcover – Dec 15 1998


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Forbidden Archeology: The Full Unabridged Edition + Human Devolution: a Vedic alternative to Darwin's theory + Forbidden Archeologist: The Atlantis Rising Magazine Columns of Michael A. Cremo
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 914 pages
  • Publisher: Torchlight Publishing; 2nd Revised edition edition (Dec 15 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0892132949
  • ISBN-13: 978-0892132942
  • Product Dimensions: 15.6 x 5.7 x 23.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (75 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #12,746 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From the Publisher

I perceive in Forbidden Archeology a work of thoroughgoing scholarship and intellectual adventure. -Dr. Pierce Flynn

About the Author

Michael A Cremo is a research associate of the Bhaktivedanta Institute specializing in the history and philosophy of science. His persistent investigations during the eight years of writing Forbidden Archeology documented a major scientific cover-up. Richard L. Thompson, founding member of the Bhaktivedanta Institute, received his Ph.D. in mathematics form Cornell University.

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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Bruce Boatner on March 23 2002
Format: Hardcover
Remember Gary Larsen's "Far Side" cartoon of the scientists dropping everything and running outside when the Good Humor truck comes by? We tend to think of scientists as beyond reproach - but they're not. They're just as emotional and jumpy as the rest of us, especially when their pet doctrines get called into question.
In Science the drill is to glom onto the accepted belief system and hang on for dear life. God forbid some punky upstart like Fritjof Capra should come along and write a smart-alecky book about how Vedic texts described the same tenets as Quantum Physics a coupla thousand years ago. Or Rupert Sheldrake would have the nerve to point out that the DNA emperor has not clothes. Howls of derision. Calls for book burning in the journal "Science". Yellink und screamink.
Now I don't think it takes 900+ pages to make a point. Probably 150 would have been adequate to get everybody's bowels in an uproar. The 2-cassette audio abridgement seems to do a pretty good job. As far as the actual validity of the overall argument - who knows? The evidence proposed is probably just as valid as the official party line.
It is important to remember that all scientific revolutions go through pretty much the same drill: Scorn and derision towards those presenting novel or contrary opinions, followed by fear, panic and banishment of those individuals when it begins to appear that empirical data is supporting the new theories, then total abandonment of previously cherished notions, accompanied by jumping on the bandwagon with abandon while announcing that they'd been supporting the new idea all along.
So it's really the process that's important here. Hey, sit back and enjoy the show!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Joyce L. Paski on Aug. 5 1999
Format: Hardcover
I almost gave up on reading this book, but I'm glad I didn't. Part I was definitely dry reading except for the Sheguiandah, Canada section which was interesting enough to make me forget about the writing style. Part II of the book was much easier to read. Bits of humor did make it through the writing style (grown men throwing elephant dung at one another; goldminers and artifacts in poker games; erstwhile poets!?!). The appendices and bibliography are very informative. Chapters 9 and 10 (Peking Man and Cryptozoology) made the purchase of the book worth while for me. I found one error (p.320, l.6 at the end of the line - "there" should be "their"). On the whole, I give the book 3 stars and recommend it. A tremendous undertaking, well done. My commendations to the authors.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Dr. C. Gillooly (bitedoc@msn.com) on Nov. 10 1998
Format: Hardcover
I was impressed by the thoroughness of the documentation and resource material. It is essential to good science that all of the data and background facts be available for all to evaluate. On the contrary, very few anthropology courses even suggest that this material exists. The point that the authors have well presented is that hominid paleoarcheology is one of the most subjective and "educated-guess-filled" realms of science, based on precious, relatively scarce, "hard" evidence. It is good science to continually question the favored theories; and, in general, the book is successful in its correct attempt to insert the selectively forgotten data of the history of mankind into the record for objective consideration. Any truly scientific mind should appreciate it as such.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sean F. Keating on Oct. 25 2001
Format: Hardcover
Mr Cremo recently appeared on a radio interview show. To read this book, one gets the feeling he went to considerable pains to cite his sources and at the same time make the book readable for other than the lab-rat culture.
To hear the interview on radio, you are given this one golden nugget:
It is not any one instance of supression or omission that makes a case for this view of mankind's history, but rather the hundreds of well documented cases of proof that the scientific culture has it dead wrong.
Paraphrasing his words there, but the essence is in that statement.
He also has said something else that really grabbed me:
The creationists are wrong, insinuating that man has had one continuing trip through the 15000 or so years of existance from day 1 to the present.
The evolutionists are likewise wrong, and the "missing link" is their major flaw. In fact, the modern (scientific) movement has a 2-fold agenda: Advance the Chaos Theory, in which all the universe is one big happy accident, and Reduce humankind to mere animals with higher thinking abilities.
Overall, he shows us a very compelling reason why science and faith can BOTH have some of it right. In this, I have found a sense of hope. I only hope that this is the beginning of a renaissance in modern science and theology. Perhaps the knowlege I have long suspected as supressed by governments and religious institutions (read:Vatican) will yet someday come "out".
I do know this- Dogma exists in every institution. When that dogma is challenged, especially with proof, the reaction can be violent at many levels. Witness some of the other reviews...
Meethink thou doth protest too much.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Oatwillie on Sept. 17 1998
Format: Hardcover
I think that every archeology undergrad should find this of benefit. But don't expect Eric Von Danican. It will be slow going for most of you. But I do appreciate what the author is saying, and it's very, very valid. I even got some cartoon ideas out of it!
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