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Forbidden Planet [HD DVD]


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PRODUCT ALERT:
• IMPORTANT NOTICE: This high-definition disc will only play in an HD DVD player. It will not play in a Blu-ray player or a PS3.

Product Details

  • Actors: Walter Pidgeon, Anne Francis, Leslie Nielsen, Warren Stevens, Jack Kelly
  • Directors: Fred M. Wilcox
  • Writers: Allen Adler, Cyril Hume, Irving Block, William Shakespeare
  • Producers: Nicholas Nayfack
  • Format: AC-3, Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, Dubbed, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, French, Spanish
  • Dubbed: French, Spanish
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.40:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: G
  • Studio: Warner
  • Release Date: Nov. 14 2006
  • Run Time: 98 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (125 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000I2J2W2
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #73,913 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)


Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Captain Canada on Jan. 5 2013
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
This is an absolutely brilliant cult classic movie featuring a very young Leslie Nielsen. It is light-years ahead of its time, well made, highly watchable and definitely one for any sci-fi buff's movie collection.

Now, sure, these days we have CGI and all that good bananas, so you have to remember that this was made nearly sixty years ago and, yes, it looks like it. But considering the technical limitations that they had to struggle with, it's a bloody masterpiece! Seriously, I can't believe they were doing effects work like it then and clearly these pioneering boys blazed the trail for Jurassic Park's digital dinos, Gollum, Avatar and so on that we enjoy today.

Story-wise, it's a kinda riff on Shakespeare's 'The Tempest' and Walter Pidgeon turns in a very solid performance as the main antagonist (even if subconsciously) notwithstanding the fact that the script—and his character in particular—seems to spend the time over-explaining stuff. But it's nonetheless highly watchable and an enjoyable ride.

I should point out that Forbidden Planet is not a restored version like the *superb* recent Jaws or slightly less jaw-dropping Lawrence of Arabia, but the image quality on Blu-Ray is very good nonetheless and the colors are pleasingly vibrant. Also, the disc contains a bunch of special features including deleted and lost footage, documentary material and a couple of additional Robby The Robot flicks, bringing good value to the package.

If you love movies, sci-fi, filmaking or man-in-suit robots, this movie is a must have. Highly recommended, add to cart. :-)
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Kaczmarek on July 4 2004
Format: DVD
Like all good film science fiction, "Forbidden Planet" keeps its concepts simple but their ramifications grand, which is just one of the reasons it is a timeless classic. Made at a time when sci-fi was the junk that kept restless kids in theater seats on Saturday afternoons, this ambitious take on Shakespeare's "The Tempest" nonetheless also aims for adults that grew up on the pulp fiction of the 1920s and 30s. (Its delightful production design is a seamless mix of colors, forms, and shapes familiar from those imaginative magazine covers.) The premise is Star Trek a decade before Star Trek, as a military cruiser commanded by the hard-nosed but humane J.J. Adams (Leslie Nielsen doing an effective melodramatic turn) visits a world populated by a secretive scholar (a wonderful Walter Pidgeon), his curious daughter (a sometimes grating Ann Francis), their robot butler (the epitome of mechanical men) and a mostly unseen terror (illustrated by topnotch Disney animators). Beyond great special effects and an innovative musical score, the film also engages a firm--if now familiar--science fiction plot, unlike so many of the noisy and expensive but ultimately overwrought and empty-headed sci-fi movies of today.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Anthony Marinelli on April 1 2013
Format: DVD
There were many science fiction films and they all seem to spring up like the new saeson's grass during the 50's? What caused the advent of science fiction which although there were a few in the 30's well received like the Invisible man Island of LOst Souls and Shelley's Frankenstein series(I recall seeing all these films as a kid). However it wasnt until the 50's with Rocketship X_M War of the Worlds(which alfred hitchcock was not given rights to produce as well as being refused Our Man iN Havana books written in his own country)The Thing and many low budget films. Many of them especially given the lacklustre special effects (George Lucas really made special effects an industry in hollywood and changed the nature of filmmaking and the visual process of films whether you like it or not. It became a more visual experience and stress was emphasized in that dimension of the viewing process. We had special effects and often secondarily a story built around the special effects, and when I see a film this is very much a strong part of the viewing of a film, although there's no reason a strong story can not complement the experience. Practice makes perfect..and thats the idea of this film. Its origins lie in a fragment of Shakespeare's the Tempest his last play although he did later collaborate and come out of retirement to write with john fletcher(The two noble kinsman, parts of henry 8?). The film also includes some freudian psychology of his idea of the perfecting of people, I stress that not all agree. MGM is proud they made this film and it has a great reputation as a sci fi film breaking through into the mainstream and only the greatest of sci fi films or writers can say this about their product.Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Theo TOP 500 REVIEWER on Feb. 16 2013
Format: DVD
Forbidden Planet is perhaps the pre-eminent work of 1950s science fantasy. It is not by any stretch of the imagination hard science fiction, but it is a thoughtful and intelligent offering in its own way.

Famously (but very loosely) based on Shakespeare's "The Tempest", this is a movie where there are as many potential layers of meaning as you want to find. With Morbius cast as Prospero, and Prospero in turn very likely based on the Elizabethan magus Dr. John Dee, co-creator of the Enochian magical language, is it really a co-incidence that Morbius is himself a linguist?

There is much more that I'd like to say here, but I'm holding back for the sake of those who are not already familiar with the film. I don't want to give away any spoilers. For those who have seen the film, and who feel inclined towards such exercises, I'll just ask this: to whom - or what - would you assign the respective roles of Ariel and Caliban? How would you fit your answers in with the film's wider themes? And what do your answers suggest about how matter and spirit were respectively conceived in the minds of the Elizabethans versus the Americans of the 1950s? Just something to think about.

For those who haven't yet seen Forbidden Planet, I'd say first and foremost that this is a wonderful film that works perfectly well on the level of a straightforward adventure that a 10 year old could enjoy. As a piece of science fiction, I'd only stress that such depths as you will find are of philosophy more than science; although the classic technological themes of 1950s science fiction are played out in metaphorical form. Happily though, the reds under the bed/saucers in the sky metaphor that became such a cliché in so much of the science fiction of the day is nowhere to be found.
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