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Forests of the Heart Hardcover – Jun 3 2000


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books (June 3 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312865198
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312865191
  • Product Dimensions: 24.2 x 16.5 x 3.2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 771 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,778,702 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


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First Sentence
Like her sister, Bettina San Miguel was a small, slender woman in her mid-twenties, dark-haired and darker-eyed; part Indio, part Mexican, part something older still. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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By Michael J. Vuolo on June 21 2004
Format: Paperback
DeLint is quickly becoming my favorite author, or at least sharing the title with Neil Gaiman.
FotH is the 3rd De Lint book I've read in the inviting city of Newford, and the familiarity with the city is a huge part of my enjoyment reading these. The place is starting to really feel like home, becoming someplace I can see when I read about it.
Of course, the inhabitants, human and otherwise, are the main draw though. De Lint has a magic touch for reaching out and putting a very real soul, very real pain and very real love into every character he explores, from the main protagonists to the smallest side character.
Forests of the Heart again deals with a beautiful blend of the old world faerie stories and native America mysticism, and the two worlds, even in their clashing that this book centers on, fit together like a perfect puzzle.
I try to save 5 star ratings for the absolutely best books, like De Lint's own Memory & Dream, but this is damn close. If you believe there are other things in the world with us, that most people don't see all there is to see and that reality is much deeper than the world at large accepts, read this book. Read as much De Lint as you can get your hands on.
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By EmBee on Feb. 29 2004
Format: Paperback
If you're a fan of Charles de Lint, you're in for a treat with this one. If you're not a fan - read this book, and you will be.
Set in de Lint's imaginary North American city of Newford, this novel has all the good stuff and none of the drawbacks of its urban-magic heritage. Here are new characters (with your old friends in the background, mentioned but not present) that fairly sparkle with life in all their believable complexity. And once again de Lint is breaking new ground in a genre sometimes rife with boring repetition. This is a great author at his finest. The man can WRITE!
Art, magic, music, true love and mystery abound.The pacing is edgy and tight and the denoument unhurried and satisfying, and life-altering experiences all around. There are already a million reviews of this book, so I won't summarize the plot for you, but I have to say: THIS BOOK ROCKS. It's a triumph for de Lint and a joy for the reader. BUY IT!!
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By A Customer on Oct. 3 2003
Format: Paperback
Charles de Lint is one of my favorite authors. Trader and The Onion Girl, in particular, are standout examples of his standout talent for blending our reality with myth, and getting readers to question the division between the two. Both books are explorations of humanity, spirituality, creativity, and love, succeeding where Forests of the Heart fails. The trials in Forests seem somewhat implausible, the characters largely undeveloped, and key relationships aren't given enough space to unfold into credibility, much less life. There are some good patches, especially in his development of Bettina's character (if not her language skills), but this book really feels like a formulaic return to Newford for no reason other than satisfying deLint's ravenous fans. If you are collecting the Newford books, then by all means get this one. It's certainly stronger than the early short stories of Dreams Underfoot and deLint's other, more experimental starting work. If you're only looking at this book because some starry-eyed deLint fan such as myself told you to read his work, though, please do yourself a favor and start off with either Trader or his short-story collection Tapping the Dream Tree. Either book - Tapping especially - will help you to get your feet wet in the world of Newford without completely overwhelming you with characters you haven't yet gotten to know, and still show you how good an author deLint can be.
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Format: Paperback
While I enjoyed Forests of the Heart, I also found it to be the least satisfying of the six or seven De Lint novels that I've read to this point. As always, the ensemble cast is strong, with characters that make you either care for or despise them. But things get a little slow around page 90, and drag for another 50 pages or so. I feel that De Lint can sometimes put just a little too much gratuitous dialogue into some of his tales, and this stretch particularly suffers in that manner. The initial conflict between Donal and Miki seems somewhat contrived, not exactly coming out of nowhere, and yet leaving me wondering what's going on, until it's gradually explained in the narrative. Still, the overall premise is intriguing, and it's a good read, especially when you get past page 140 or so.
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Format: Paperback
I always love the ideas of Charles de Lint's novels, but this is really the first one where I was as satisfied with the execution as I was with the story setup.
Often with De Lint, it almost feels like he spent all his time building the world that his characters are moving in and almost forgets about the plot. I suppose what I like best about Forests of the Heart is that the plot is very strong. I cared enormously what happened to the characters, and kept reading because I wanted to see what would happen further, but I was also terribly sorry to see the pages decreasing because I was just enjoying reading it so much.
High recommend.
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By Vanessa on Jan. 29 2003
Format: Paperback
Every time I pick up a Charles De Lint novel, it is because I am seduced by what seems like a fascinating possibility for a story. Unfortunately, by the time I finish with each of Mr. De Lint's works, I am disappointed by his facile and unchallenging resolutions to what might have been excellent plots. De Lint has great characters, with interesting and believable relationships to each other, but they think and behave in ways that are at odds with the mood and description of the world in the story.
A final point: if you are going to write a novel, and you feel that you will not disrupt the flow of narrative and dialogue, both internal and external, with passages in another language (which De Lint clumsily insists on doing here, primarily with Spanish, and also with Gaelic and Celtic) then for heaven's sake GET IT RIGHT!
Is it possible that he thought no native Spanish speakers would read the book? He repeatedly refers to hes as shes and mixes up tenses and cases. His disrespect is insulting. Please, novelists, have enough respect for any language to hire an editor who is familiar with it.
Adding "o" to the end of an English word does not a Spanish word make!!
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