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Forests of the Heart Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Gollancz
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0575072334
  • ISBN-13: 978-0575072336
  • Product Dimensions: 13.4 x 3 x 21.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 422 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,984,851 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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First Sentence
Like her sister, Bettina San Miguel was a small, slender woman in her mid-twenties, dark-haired and darker-eyed; part Indio, part Mexican, part something older still. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

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By Michael J. Vuolo on June 21 2004
Format: Paperback
DeLint is quickly becoming my favorite author, or at least sharing the title with Neil Gaiman.
FotH is the 3rd De Lint book I've read in the inviting city of Newford, and the familiarity with the city is a huge part of my enjoyment reading these. The place is starting to really feel like home, becoming someplace I can see when I read about it.
Of course, the inhabitants, human and otherwise, are the main draw though. De Lint has a magic touch for reaching out and putting a very real soul, very real pain and very real love into every character he explores, from the main protagonists to the smallest side character.
Forests of the Heart again deals with a beautiful blend of the old world faerie stories and native America mysticism, and the two worlds, even in their clashing that this book centers on, fit together like a perfect puzzle.
I try to save 5 star ratings for the absolutely best books, like De Lint's own Memory & Dream, but this is damn close. If you believe there are other things in the world with us, that most people don't see all there is to see and that reality is much deeper than the world at large accepts, read this book. Read as much De Lint as you can get your hands on.
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By A Customer on Oct. 3 2003
Format: Paperback
Charles de Lint is one of my favorite authors. Trader and The Onion Girl, in particular, are standout examples of his standout talent for blending our reality with myth, and getting readers to question the division between the two. Both books are explorations of humanity, spirituality, creativity, and love, succeeding where Forests of the Heart fails. The trials in Forests seem somewhat implausible, the characters largely undeveloped, and key relationships aren't given enough space to unfold into credibility, much less life. There are some good patches, especially in his development of Bettina's character (if not her language skills), but this book really feels like a formulaic return to Newford for no reason other than satisfying deLint's ravenous fans. If you are collecting the Newford books, then by all means get this one. It's certainly stronger than the early short stories of Dreams Underfoot and deLint's other, more experimental starting work. If you're only looking at this book because some starry-eyed deLint fan such as myself told you to read his work, though, please do yourself a favor and start off with either Trader or his short-story collection Tapping the Dream Tree. Either book - Tapping especially - will help you to get your feet wet in the world of Newford without completely overwhelming you with characters you haven't yet gotten to know, and still show you how good an author deLint can be.
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By Vanessa on Jan. 29 2003
Format: Paperback
Every time I pick up a Charles De Lint novel, it is because I am seduced by what seems like a fascinating possibility for a story. Unfortunately, by the time I finish with each of Mr. De Lint's works, I am disappointed by his facile and unchallenging resolutions to what might have been excellent plots. De Lint has great characters, with interesting and believable relationships to each other, but they think and behave in ways that are at odds with the mood and description of the world in the story.
A final point: if you are going to write a novel, and you feel that you will not disrupt the flow of narrative and dialogue, both internal and external, with passages in another language (which De Lint clumsily insists on doing here, primarily with Spanish, and also with Gaelic and Celtic) then for heaven's sake GET IT RIGHT!
Is it possible that he thought no native Spanish speakers would read the book? He repeatedly refers to hes as shes and mixes up tenses and cases. His disrespect is insulting. Please, novelists, have enough respect for any language to hire an editor who is familiar with it.
Adding "o" to the end of an English word does not a Spanish word make!!
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Format: Hardcover
Forests of the Heart, the latest from Charles de Lint, is a masterwork of dramatic fiction, a contemporary fantasy laced with horror, suspense and magic -- and characters so strikingly drawn they'll seem as real as the people you see every day on the street.
Forests of the Heart begins slowly. There's not much action as de Lint spins the background needed for his tale and allows his characters time to grow. But don't assume that means it's a plodding introduction; the tale is enticing from the start. Once the plot begins to unravel and things begin to happen, you'll certainly find yourself riveted to the pages, bitterly resenting anything which yanks you away from reading (including work and sleep).
Forget the fantasy -- de Lint makes even mundane moments seem magical simply by drawing the readers' attention to the little details and the hidden mysteries which are all around us, but usually go completely unnoticed. Coupled with the resonant imagery and emotions conjured here, I think you'll find Forests of the Heart to be an irresistable reading experience.
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Format: Paperback
I've read three of Charles De Lint's works now and yes, they do all have some kind of myth at their core, usually combined some way with Art and Artists. This book, however, is his most mature effort. I don't mean to imply that it's a serious Oprah book or boring, just that instead of preaching like he did "memory and dream" he skillfully layers in meaning through the characters and the plot. Since everyone else has already talked about the plot, I'll move on to my experience of the work.
De Lint's narrative is sometimes slow, especially when contrasted against his marvelous action and suspense, but in this book especially you just go along with it, and the odd pace (sometimes slow and dreamy, sometimes faster and jumpier than a nightmare) just adds to the overall mythical and magical quality of the story. It makes sense and makes other stories with more even pacing seem boring and conventional.
the characters are very well fleshed out, no one is all good or all bad, everyone has their fatal flaw or hidden face. One very fun main character owns a record store and talks like the guys in "high fidelity." My favorite tho was Bettina, and the Aunts, who bring in mexican and native-american mythology and magic into the story. De Lint has obviously done his research on that score.
Imagine an adult, intelligent Harry Potter that's definitely rated R for violence and magic that's more rooted in Nature than magic words. Since I can't get across how this story sends echoes through your psyche as you read it, you'll just have to experience it for yourself. :)
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