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Forever Peace Mass Market Paperback – Oct 1 1998


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Ace; First THUS edition (Oct. 1 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0441005667
  • ISBN-13: 978-0441005666
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 2.5 x 17.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 200 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (78 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #66,285 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Amazon

Julian Class is a full-time professor and part-time combat veteran who spends a third of each month virtually wired to a robotic "soldierboy." The soldierboys, along with flyboys and other advanced constructs, allow the U.S. to wage a remotely controlled war against constant uprisings in the Third World. The conflicts are largely driven by the so-called First World countries' access to nanoforges--devices that can almost instantly manufacture any product imaginable, given the proper raw materials--and the Third World countries' lack of access to these devices. But even as Julian learns that the consensual reality shared by soldierboy operators can lead to universal peace, the nanoforges create a way for humanity to utterly destroy itself, and it will be a race against time to see which will happen first. Although Forever Peace bears a title similar to Joe Haldeman's classic novel The Forever War, he says it's not a sequel. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Veteran sf writer Haldeman views this novel not as a continuation of but as a follow-up to the problems raised in his highly acclaimed 1975 novel, Forever War. In the Universal Welfare State in 2043, draftees and volunteers link their brains to "soldierboy" war machines that do the actual fighting hundreds of miles away. Black physics professor and linked draftee Julian Class; his white mentor and lover, Dr. Amelia Harding; and her colleague Peter discover that the high-profile Jupiter Project is about to re-create the Big Bang that will destroy the solar system. The original 20 survivors of an experiment to link brains via implanted jacks discover they can turn people into pacifists by linking them for two weeks. Together with Julian and Amelia, the group stays one jump ahead of assassins as they try to stop the project and pacify key figures. At once a hard science, military, and political thriller, this book presents a thoughtful and hopeful solution to ending war in the 21st century. Essential for sf collections.
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars

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By S. HONG on March 22 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
i remembered reading a book called "all my sins remembered" (AMSR) as a boy of 11 or 12. at that age i was pretty much into SF what with star_wars (later to be retitled 'episode IV a new hope'), 2001 a space Odessey Battlestar Galactica on TV, Star Trek - original series, close encounters of the 3rd kind. AMSR struck something like a bell in me, it was to me a different sort of SF, very well remembered sort of SF.
getting back to 'Forever Peace'. fast forward to some 20 years on i read it after 'Forever War' which i first came across on a dark horse comic publication. this was a long time ago - about 4 years ago. so what business do i have writing a review about it now? i can talk about the impression FP had on me just like AMSR did. like drinking good hot coffee.
the message is often the same: the numbing senselessness of war on the very immediate personnal level. fighters fought because they had to. call it fate or karma. there is often no right or wrong but there are the fortunate and the unfortunate, the quick and the dead, the smart and the stupid, and caught in between the rough stuffs and the really rough stuffs is love, um, isn't it like in the office this morning? maybe not and well, i'm not a soldier but i don't have to be one to appreciate books on the subject or know what the writer is saying.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Unlike "Forever Free", "Forever Peace" is not a sequel to author Joe Haldeman's award-winning landmark novel "Forever War". Some view it as an ideological sequel, if not an actual one. I'm not sure I agree with that, as "Forever Peace" is a vastly different story with different characters and a much earlier timeline. The only similarities lie in the books respective disdain for war. "Forever Peace" is not up the level of quality of "Forever War", but it is still a good book.

The story of "Forever Peace" centers on a full-time college professor and part-time combat soldier named Julian Class. Julian is part of a new breed of soldier that doesn't physically fight the battles themselves. Through robotic and biological advancements that bear many similarities to the methods used in the "Matrix" movies, soldiers are now operators whose minds are 'plugged-in' to the warrior-robot machines (called 'Soldierboys') they control and the platoon members they control these robots with. While not putting the soldiers in any imminent physical danger, the control of the Soldierboys does bring about the high risk of mental and emotional wounds. These Soldierboys are used primarily to put down uprisings in Third World countries. These uprisings are caused primarily by conflicts over control of a technology called nanoforges, which are machines capable of designing and creating almost any physical product necessary for survival and prosperity. In the midst of the strife caused by uprisings, there is also the planned unveiling of the most ambitious and massive scientific experiment ever conceived.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
STORY: As some editorial reviews put it: Veteran sf writer Haldeman views this novel NOT as a continuation of but as a follow-up to the problems raised in his highly acclaimed 1975 novel, Forever War. Julian Class is a full-time professor and part-time combat veteran who spends a third of each month virtually wired to a robotic "soldierboy." The soldierboys, along with flyboys and other advanced constructs, allow the U.S. to wage a remotely controlled war against constant uprisings in the Third World. The conflicts are largely driven by the so-called First World countries' access to nanoforges--devices that can almost instantly manufacture any product imaginable, given the proper raw materials--and the Third World countries' lack of access to these devices. But even as Julian learns that the consensual reality shared by soldierboy operators can lead to universal peace, the nanoforges create a way for humanity to utterly destroy itself, and it will be a race against time to see which will happen first."
MY FEEDBACK:
1) SETTING - the story takes place in 2043 a.d. on Earth. There are references to space travel, but the entire drama and story take place on an Earth where political forces are at war in every country. Thus a world at war with itself is believable. Also, Haldeman employs scientific advances that are reminiscent of cyberpunk stories like Neuromancer and the like.
2) CHARACTERS - Julian Class and Dr. Amelia Harding are the two protagonists. Characters are likeable and flawed. Julian is mostly flawed due to the society he has grown up in, the job he has been recruited to and the challenges of changing it all. But he moves forward amidst his flaws which makes him likeable. The overall cast is interesting, but don't get involved much.
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By David Hood on Aug. 2 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book contains a great novella, about an individual dealing with his military service as a remote soldier-boy, operating a military robot miles away from a protected base. Unfortunately, Haldeman jumps the story in it's tracks twice.
We first jump the tracks when our hero leaves the soldier-boy life behind and his academic pursuits which were just a side-plot become the whole plot. It appears there may be a world destroying experiment about to run.
We again jump the tracks and the world destroying experiment goes back to being a secondary plot point in favor of a ludicrous idea to "humanize" the world by linking everyone together to prevent them from being able to kill, or even be aggressive. In some ways this is like Stand on Zanzibar by Brunner, but it is more sinister, like Invasion of the Body Snatchers, but the Body Snatchers are the heroes. Haldeman here returns to the idea of Hive-Mind, or Communal Society that he presented as being bad in Forever War and Forever Free, here though it appears that brief patches of being part of a group mind essentially neuter a species violent impulses.
Putting my issues about the ridiculousness of the plot, and it's philosphy aside the book still fails after leaving the soldier boy plot on other levels. Other reviewers have mentioned it goes from being a good war story, to a spy story. As a spy story it is third rate, not fleshed out properly and filled with bumbling characters.
I was a huge fan of the Forever War, now after this book and Forever Free, I fear I may be Forever Finished with Haldeman.
Three stars for this book, because the first third was quite good.
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