The Forgotten and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 9.89
  • List Price: CDN$ 10.99
  • You Save: CDN$ 1.10 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Usually ships within 1 to 3 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Forgotten Mass Market Paperback – Jun 13 2002


See all 15 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 9.89
CDN$ 9.89 CDN$ 0.01

Best Books of 2014
Unruly Places is our #1 pick for 2014. See all

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Avon; 1 Reprint edition (June 13 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0380730847
  • ISBN-13: 978-0380730841
  • Product Dimensions: 17.6 x 11.1 x 2.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 200 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (43 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #854,610 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Amazon

L.A. homicide detective Peter Decker and Rina Lazarus, his Orthodox Jewish wife, return in a new entry in this popular series. Faye Kellerman can be counted on to deliver emotional complexity along with suspense, and in The Forgotten it comes from the relationship between Peter and Jacob, Rina's troubled teenage son. Jacob has a personal connection to the event that sets off this intricately plotted novel, the defacing of Rina's synagogue by one of his classmates. Ernesto Golding can't explain why he vandalized the synagogue, but when he and his therapists are murdered months after the incident, Peter realizes that something the teenager told him when admitting his guilt may hold the key to the killings: Ernesto's belief that his grandfather may have been a Nazi who posed as a Jew to escape to South America after the war. Investigating Ernesto's story gives Rina a strand of the plot to tease out; meanwhile, Peter concentrates on another motive for the therapist murders that involves computer fraud, the College Board exams, and the high cost exacted by parents who pressure their teenagers to succeed.

Kellerman skillfully keeps the dramatic tension going as she pulls all the pieces of her complex plot together. But what makes this novel her best yet is her acutely revealing portrait of Jacob, struggling with the existential angst of adolescence as he attempts to reconcile his devotion to Judaism with the temptations of contemporary life, from drugs to sex. She brilliantly limns his search for identity, intimacy, and independence even as he redefines his relationship to Peter and Rina, in a scenario that resounds with psychological truth. The Forgotten is a terrific addition to the Kellerman oeuvre. While she's always been an exceptional illustrator of the emotional life of the family, this time she writes with an expertise that may owe something to professional insights of her husband, author Jonathan Kellerman, who's also a child psychologist. --Jane Adams --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

In this complex, disturbing novel (after 2000's Stalker), Kellerman again adroitly balances Rina Lazarus's consuming Orthodox Judaism with the broader societal issues faced by her husband, L.A. homicide detective Peter Decker. Here they intertwine when the vicious defacement of their synagogue reverberates in a widening circle of murders. Ernesto Golding, a troubled, spoiled youth and acquaintance of Rina's son, Jacob, confesses to the crime, but several months later Ernesto and his therapists, Mervin and Dee Baldwin, are murdered. Ernesto had discovered that his beloved grandfather may have been a Nazi who escaped Germany disguised as a Jew. While Rina delves into this provocative strand of the plot, Peter and his staff investigate hate groups. Then another killing ties the therapists to not only the hate groups but also an insidious current of psychological and sexual manipulation and computer fraud. Kellerman focuses on the plight of desperate young people misused and misunderstood by their parents, who apply unbearable pressures for success on their often- bewildered children. She also shows the deepening love and rapport between Decker and his stepson as Jacob helps solve the case. Although the Holocaust subplot seems forced to give Rina a larger role, the author, as usual, seamlessly weaves her themes of religious belief and familial respect into a multilayered thriller, with finely realized characters and a tangible sense of place. 250,000 first printing.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
The call was from the police. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
First, let me get a pet peeve off of my chest regarding this author. It seems that in almost every book she has some personal bias against others yet at the same time she wants the reader to believe that she has all the answers to to the eternal questions of every countries standing against the Holocaust.In this book there comes a point where she has the main character (Rina) speaking about Poland's part during the Holocaust. I should say the Polish peoples part in the Holocaust. Not the Germans who invaded Poland.
Ms. Kellerman states that the Polish people basically rolled over and joined the Germans terror of the Jews. This is not true. I am a descendant of a family that lost a four people in my immediate to the Nazis.
My grandmother and her mother escaped to Switzerland during the Holocaust. My grandmother lost her father and three brothers in the Holocaust. They were Polish Catholics. Her brothers died fighting the Germans. Her father died in a concentration camp in Germany.
Let's not forget that many other non-Jews gave thier lives to fight Hitler also.
O.K. this book was much better than the last one. It did run on a bit with the differing plots and such. I thought having the killers involved in racism and the SAT scandal was a bit over the top. All in all, aside from my personal pet peeve which brought the story down alot for me personally, I would give it a C. I would also like to add that I really enjoy learning about the Jewish religion. It is fascinating to me. I also wished there was more of a story with Peter and Rina's home life. I love to read about that.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Faye Kellerman is definitely the No 1-crime fiction writer of today, and ranks up there with the best novelists of police and crime thrillers.
She has not in any way lost any of her talent for keeping the reader glued to the book, and opening up a world of intrigue and mystery.
This book proves Kellerman's skill at moving skillfully from the homely to the horrific, from warmth to horror, from heroic to diabolical.
In an age where the hideous anti-Semitism is on the rise again, in measure never seen since the fall of Nazi Germany, the story begins with the hideous desecration of Peter and Rina's local synagogue, through the world of shady White Supremacist type groups, teenagers corrupted into insanity by their parents, whose own 60's radicalism, in my opinion, was the root of all the evil, drugs, bizarre sex rituals and murder.
Of course Peter and his teams determination and Rina's sanity and compassion helps restore truth and balance. Rina's rebellious son Jacob plays a big role in bringing this one to being solved.
On the downside I would have liked to see some of Cindy , and Marge's stepdaughter Vega.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Rina's store front synagogue is vandalized with paint and litered with pictures of Nazi death camp victims. Hate crimes are investigated so Peter checks in. They are surprised to find out it was done by a classmate of their son, Jacob. That boy is Jewish, too, so what was his motive? As Peter digs into background, he finds many interesting facts plus a few dead bodies. He also becomes acquainted with the Doctors Baldwin of psychology: the husband runs an out door camp (tough-love makes big bucks easy) while the wife builds up a big-success reputation by mentoring boys in SAT tests and getting them admitted to top universaries. Is there anything wrong with what they are doing? This story is defined by the Jewish family life, the adolescent troubles of teen-age boys in school and social growth, the relationship and trust between son and step-father, and how it relates to previous generations.Sound dull? Not by Kellerman! She weaves all these things into a good tale full of suspense and mystery. Someone has to pay for the crimes and they do. A good read as usual by this author.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Rina's store front synagogue is vandalized with paint and litered with pictures of Nazi death camp victims. Hate crimes are investigated so Peter checks in. They are surprised to find out it was done by a classmate of their son, Jacob. That boy is Jewish, too, so what was his motive? As Peter digs into background, he finds many interesting facts plus a few dead bodies. He also becomes acquainted with the Doctors Baldwin of psychology: the husband runs an out door camp (tough-love makes big bucks easy) while the wife builds up a big-success reputation by mentoring boys in SAT tests and getting them admitted to top universaries. Is there anything wrong with what they are doing? This story is defined by the Jewish family life, the adolescent troubles of teen-age boys in school and social growth, the relationship and trust between son and step-father, and how it relates to previous generations.Sound dull? Not by Kellerman! She weaves all these things into a good tale full of suspense and mystery. Someone has to pay for the crimes and they do. A good read as usual by this author.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By A Customer on Aug. 9 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I remember there was a time where I actually said to myself, "Faye Kellerman writes better than her husband." Not that Jonathan Kellerman was ever bad, I just thought that Faye had a bit of a better style. Suffice it to say, something's happened. Mr. Kellerman's books have been absolutely incredible reads (I can't snatch his books up or finish them fast enough), while Faye's have just been not up to their usual standards. I noticed the difference after Jupiter's Bones, and it really became apparent after Stalker. Nevertheless, I still got excited with I saw The Forgotten in the store and snatched it right up.
The first third of this book is pretty bad. Does Faye have some apprentice she's letting write part of these books? It sure seems like it! I don't have the book in front of me, but if I did, I would have to make note of some of the truly bad lines that were in here. I was stupefied! After the first third of the book, the writing style suddenly got better, although the plot remained pretty much stale. I was totally unimpressed with the character of Ruby Ranger who was just disgusting and vile, but had nothing else. I guess cardboard is a good word for her. A totally unconvincing character. And the villain had a somewhat interesting motivation, but was overall not developed well. The ending of this book was totally unsatisfying. I won't ruin it for anyone else, but it was pretty much dumb.
And another thing. I have no connection at all to the Jewish culture, but liked reading about it courtesy of Faye Kellerman, but I have to say that the whole victim thing is now quite tiring. In a world where the conflict in the Middle East has been brought to the American doorstep, it's quite annoying to hear about Jews as victims victims victims.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most recent customer reviews



Feedback