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Foundation's Edge Hardcover – Jun 1 1982


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 366 pages
  • Publisher: Doubleday; 1st Edition edition (June 1982)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385177259
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385177252
  • Product Dimensions: 21.1 x 14.7 x 3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 295 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (57 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #499,053 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is by far the worst book in foundation/robot series by Isaac Asimov. Don't get me wrong -it's still better than most other works in the field of science-fiction. However, the fans of Hari Seldon and his Plan will find this book somewhat disappointing due to this new twist. First of all, THIS IS NOT THE LAST BOOK IN FOUNDATION SERIES. Foundation and Earth, is the last novel , and the action takes place right where Foundation's Edge left off. However, FOUNDATION AND EARTH, THE LAST BOOK IN THE SERIES, THE BOOK THAT TIES ROBOT AND FOUNDATION NOVELS TOGETHER, FOR SOME REASON, IS OUT OF PRINT. ( Publishing companies work in mysterious ways....) Anyways, back to the book. The main character, who is the citizen of the First Foundation takes off along with few other people on the quest (which concludes in Foundation and Earth) to find the long lost planet, where human life began, Earth. In the meanwhile, Second Foundation's telepaths feel that something is not right, something is interfiering with the order of things. In the end, chosen people from two foundations arrive to some mysterious planet, where one person will decide the fate of the galaxy.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Tom Bruno on Feb. 15 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Written in 1982 - about three decades after the publication of Second Foundation, the original end to the trilogy - Foundation's Edge is a cautionary tale about not letting a publisher talk you into writing an unnecessary sequel to an otherwise successful book or series. It starts out well enough, with the events of the previous novel a century in the past and the Galaxy seemingly on the track to peace, love, and happiness thanks to psychohistorian Hari Seldon and his thousand-year Plan to transition the human race from the end of their beloved Galactic Empire to a Second one, avoiding the three hundred millennia of chaos and barbarism that would have ensued without Seldon's help. Things are going well for the Foundation and its ever-expanding sphere of influence - too well, as it turns out, prompting a quest to see if the secretive mentalists of the Second Foundation are still attempting to control history despite their presumed destruction at the end of the last book.
Okay, so far so good. One of the things I found odd about the Seldon Plan is that we only get to see the first few centuries of it in the original trilogy, whereas in Foundation's Edge we begin at the halfway point between the First and Second Empires. Even better. Unfortunately the direction that the novel takes from here ultimately undermines what that has gone before by making everyone in the Galaxy- not only even the puppetmaster psychics of the Second Foundation but the ones pulling their strings as well are under his/her/its control - a puppet of a mysterious force that Asimov gamely refuses to reveal at the end of the book, leaving the door open for an unnecessary sequel to this unnecessary sequel.
The funny thing is that I remember loving this book when I read it as a kid.
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By Carol Droeske on July 21 2014
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
SON IN LAW LOVED IT
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
We are now in yet another generation, which makes it hard to follow the series without the ability to attach to the characters like you nornally can. A couple new characters get featured here that you will follow through Foundation and Earth. You are nearing the end of the story and for an ending as big as Asimov is planning he needs to start the finale process already in the second to last book!
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By Avid Reader on Oct. 30 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Ok - if one were to follow just the books we have had a Prequel to Foundation, then the series itself, and now this Sequel. But all the while, Asimov has been expanding and introducing many externals, principally robots and their story and making it coincide with the Foundation Series.
Again, Asimov has an advantage of writing 30+ years after the publication of the original stories. This has allowed further advances in technology and more time to flesh out the story. We are involved with two men - Golan Trvize, an rebel of sorts who is searching for the mysterious Second Foundation and Stor Gendeibel who is part of the Second Foundation. They are both interested in the ancient planet "Earth" and somewhere along the way they end up on Gaia, that was obviously settled long ago by humans.
Sorry, but the characters in here just do not excite. They are worse that Asimov's usually lackluster rendering and I just can't keep them in mind after the story has concluded. Also, the action toward the end gets confused as if Asimov suddenly had a change of heart or (more likely) he had an idea for a future book and had to incorporate some information here to make it work.
I was expecting something different, something more. Maybe next time.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I've tried reading some of the newer SF authors and some of them, especially in the last several years, have turned out to be surprisingly excellent. Nevertheless I keep returning to the old masters with whom I grew up.
You know which three. Just so you know where I'm coming from: I've always been primarily a Heinlein fan and Asimov was a close second; although I've read Clarke I never really got into him too much. (Among SF writers since that time, my main loyalties have been to Spider Robinson and James Hogan, and among the _really_ recent ones I've been especially impressed by China Mieville, Richard Morgan, Neal Stephenson, and Robert Sawyer.)
Of the big three, Asimov undoubtedly had the highest literary output as measured in sheer wordage. I've been of the opinion for several years now that the only reason the Good Doctor stopped writing is that somebody went and told him he'd died. I have my own views about what parts of his output were of the highest quality, but there's little doubt that the Foundation series (not a "trilogy"; it was originally published as a series of short stories and novellas) is among his best known.
(He's also known, of course, for his famous robot stories. Long before the current generation of cyberwriters started screaming mouthlessly and crashing snowily, Asimov was writing compelling tales of mechanical intelligence on the presumption that such technology was on _our_ side. And like Heinlein -- and with just as little credit among modern writers -- he anticipated the recent explosion in information technology. For Heinlein, see especially _Friday_; for Asimov, drop by Trantor and visit the Galactic Library.)
He had secured his place in SF history fifty years before his death.
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