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The Fountain (Widescreen Edition) (Sous-titres français) [Import]

4.1 out of 5 stars 24 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Actors: Hugh Jackman, Rachel Weisz, Sean Patrick Thomas, Ellen Burstyn, Mark Margolis
  • Directors: Darren Aronofsky
  • Writers: Darren Aronofsky, Ari Handel
  • Producers: Ari Handel, Arnon Milchan, Eric Watson, Iain Smith, Nick Wechsler
  • Format: AC-3, Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, Dubbed, DVD-Video, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC, Import
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French
  • Dubbed: French
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: PG-13
  • Studio: Warner Bros. Pictures
  • Release Date: May 15 2007
  • Run Time: 96 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars 24 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B00005JPAR
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Product Description

Jackman/Weisz ~ Fountain

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
I had to write a review after seeing what's already here. The Fountain might be the best movie I've seen. It is both visually stunning and has a very powerful message. It is a cohesive film, but it takes a bit of effort to get into. I was still thinking about it for days after I saw it. If you don't like things on the abstract side, and are looking for easy entertainment, don't see this film. If you're after something a bit more cerebral and artful, give it a try, it is extremely rewarding.
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By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on April 3 2007
Format: DVD
Darren Aronofsky has never made movies that were easy viewing. Examples? Just watch "Pi" and "Requiem For a Dream," and you'll see why this underrated director has made one of the most astounding sci-fi movies in ages.

"The Fountain" is basically a sprawling tale that is half "real," half outside the mind -- love, immortality, death, grief and a tangled plotline that may take a few viewings to get right, but is exquisite in its simplicity. Not satisfied with depth, Aronofsky also makes it an absolutely stunning visual experience.

Research oncologist Tommy (Hugh Jackman) is trying to find a cancer cure by animal testing, so he can save the life of his dying wife Izzie (Rachel Weisz), including an unsanctioned test from a mysterious tree. As she hopes for a cure, Izzie has been writing a book about a Spanish conquistador who is seeking the immortality-granting Tree of Life.

As we see in other flashbacks, that conquistador is a version of Tommy (and Izzy as Queen Isabella). And far in the future, Tommy still struggles with his wife's loss, as he travels to a distant nebula to revive the tree. But as he finally gives in to his wife's last wish, he becomes enmeshed in a mysterious rebirth that stretches through the ages.

"The Fountain" got a royal whupping from critics, and was even booed by test audiences, who presumably couldn't understand the three storylines -- or rather, one non-linear storyline, in which the lines between reality and imagination are blurred. Perhaps all of it is true, or perhaps Tommy's mind is creating the 1500 and 2500 scenarios to help him cope.
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Format: DVD
I take to task the various reviewers that lambaste this film due to it's non-linearity and apparently confusing storyline. Aronofsky does not make films that are easy to watch, or easy to figure out the deeper themes of for that matter. The Fountain is purely an abstract hypothesis, or rather three, that are woven together in a glorious cinematic representation that is so beautiful to watch that the need for a defined narrative takes a bow in favour of the visual splendour. If you are so inclined, you can get the general idea of what the character motivations of Jackman and Weisz are in their triptych representations. When peeled back, it's actually not that complicated - love is an engine that if you let it, will drive you to do anything for whom you bestow it upon. This theme is interwoven through three time periods, all photographed by third time Aronofsky DOP collaborator Matthew Libatique. There are enough films out there to fulfill the mainstream's insatiable desire for easily digestible, instantly forgettable, high-carb, low substance genre fare. The Fountain, on the other hand, and other films such as Michel Gondry's The Science of Sleep, Spike Jonze's Being John Malkovich, and the entire catalogue of Peter Greenaway, fulfill a vastly different mandate. These film-makers are artists painting from a different cinematic palette, whose films may work better when played on a white wall in the contemporary wing of an art gallery. A setting such as this would most likely find an audience more in tune to the non-mainstream dynamics that films such as these represent. Not to say the average cinema go-er shouldn't try to expand their horizons every now and then, it's just that The Fountain wasn't made to be an average film for the average viewer, so people should keep that in mind when they view then review it.
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By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on March 11 2007
Format: DVD
Darren Aronofsky has never made movies that were easy viewing. Examples? Just watch "Pi" and "Requiem For a Dream," and you'll see why this underrated director has made one of the most astounding sci-fi movies in ages.

"The Fountain" is basically a sprawling tale that is half "real," half outside the mind -- love, immortality, death, grief and a tangled plotline that may take a few viewings to get right, but is exquisite in its simplicity. Not satisfied with depth, Aronofsky also makes it an absolutely stunning visual experience.

Research oncologist Tommy (Hugh Jackman) is trying to find a cancer cure by animal testing, so he can save the life of his dying wife Izzie (Rachel Weisz), including an unsanctioned test from a mysterious tree. As she hopes for a cure, Izzie has been writing a book about a Spanish conquistador who is seeking the immortality-granting Tree of Life.

As we see in other flashbacks, that conquistador is a version of Tommy (and Izzy as Queen Isabella). And far in the future, Tommy still struggles with his wife's loss, as he travels to a distant nebula to revive the tree. But as he finally gives in to his wife's last wish, he becomes enmeshed in a mysterious rebirth that stretches through the ages.

"The Fountain" got a royal whupping from critics, and was even booed by test audiences, who presumably couldn't understand the three storylines -- or rather, one non-linear storyline, in which the lines between reality and imagination are blurred. Perhaps all of it is true, or perhaps Tommy's mind is creating the 1500 and 2500 scenarios to help him cope.
Read more ›
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