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Four Blind Mice [Hardcover]

James Patterson
3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (205 customer reviews)

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Book Description

Nov. 18 2002 Alex Cross
Alex Cross is on his way to resign from the Washington Police when his partner John Sampson shows up at his door. One of Sampson's oldest friends has been framed for murder and, worse yet, is subject to the insular laws of the U.S. Army. The evidence is strong enough to send him to the gas chamber.

Cross and Sampson plunge into a case where military codes of honor conceal dark currents of revenge and ambition, and the men controlling the moves have the best weapons and training the world can offer. Drawing on their years of street training and an almost telepathic mutual trust, Cross and Sampson go deep into military lines to confront the most terrifying-and lethal-killer they have ever encountered.


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Product Description

From Amazon

In this latest thriller from perennial bestselling author James Patterson, Washington cop Alex Cross gets involved in his partner's effort to save the life of an old Army buddy who's facing execution for a horrendous and inexplicable murder spree in North Carolina. The Army's evidence against Sergeant Ellis Cooper, a decorated Vietnam vet, is overwhelming, which isn't surprising since it's all been planted by a quartet of killers whose reason for framing the erstwhile hero isn't revealed until long after they are. The big secret is who set the murderers loose, and in true cliffhanger fashion, Patterson keeps it under wraps until the very end. Meanwhile, his usual blend of action, violence, fast pacing and uninspired-though-serviceable prose prevail, and will probably do so all the way to the top of the bestseller lists. --Jane Adams

From Publishers Weekly

With Patterson continuing to move in unexpected directions (his next novel, The Jester, due out in March 2003, is a medieval adventure), it's a pleasure to see him touch home base with another Alex Cross thriller this one the best Cross yet. The mice of the title are three homicidal Army Rangers, Vietnam vets, and their mysterious controller; as is usual in the Cross novels, we know this much sooner than does the black Washington, D.C., detective, who gets involved when an army careerist, Sgt. Ellis Cooper, an old pal of Cross's colleague and best friend, John Sampson, is found guilty at military trial for the brutal murder of three women, but claims innocence. Traveling to North Carolina, where Cooper awaits execution, and to Fort Bragg to investigate, Cross and Sampson encounter stonewalling among the military which only intensifies as they uncover a pattern of other military men executed for like crimes they may not have committed. As the duo visits West Point, they confront an even thicker "gray" wall of silence. Meanwhile, the killers strike again, and when Cross and Sampson identify them, the Rangers begin hunting the cops. The action leads, as is Patterson's custom, to a firecracker string of climaxes; the finale finds Cross handcuffed and stripped naked in deep woods, about to be killed. Throughout, Patterson expertly balances the conspiratorial action with intriguing developments in Cross's domestic life, including health problems for his family's anchor, the elderly Nana, and growing romance between him and a California cop. Everything clicks in this novel, from Patterson's patented short chapters (115 here) to the whiplash plotting. This may not be high lit, but it sure is entertainment.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
2.0 out of 5 stars one blind editor March 23 2004
Format:Mass Market Paperback
**spoilers**
"Four Blind Mice" by James Patterson -- who usually writes engaging mystery thrillers -- is an inferior offering that suffers from an exceedingly contrived plot and numerous storytelling errors. His editor should have shelved the entire book or, at least, done a better job of proofreading.
The novel is about a group of Vietnam veterans whose war experiences turned them into sadistic, callous killers. This commonplace stereotype is undermined because they mananaged (apparently) to control their murderous impulses for thirty years until the events of the novel begin. Then they set killing other vets by framing them for murder which results in death sentences. Eventually their nefarious deeds are uncovered by Alex Cross, Patterson's earstwhile protaganist.
The novel is full of plot and narrative errors. For example, at one point a cop is killed (for no real plot purpose), but apparently his body is never found and no one ever looks for him because that's the last it's mentioned. Similarly, while the murderers had video taped all their crimes, after they're caught there's no mention of these recordings. It's as though they never existed.
At numerous time the characters repeat dialog and information.
If Patterson really wanted to write a story about Vietnam vets and (I guess) the perils of capital punishment, I wish his editor had made him get the details right.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Mixed feelings type appeal with this one. Feb. 28 2004
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I wasn't sure what Mr Patterson was trying to do with Alex Cross in this book. Alex isn't sure if he's going to retire or not. I felt that in this book Alex was in a transition phase of retiring all together or going into the FBI. It started out by helping his friend Sampson on a case which invovled an innocent veteran friend of Sampson being accused of killing 3 women. The whole concept of the 3 blind mice was great. 3 Vietnam veterans that did rogue-ish activities in the war, committing gruesome crimes in the good of U.S of A and a mysterious fourth mice is doing heavy duty cover-up. Finally, Alex have a stable love life. I really got tired of Alex feeling like he's a person that can be hard to love because of his job. There needed to be a balance in his life. I felt Mr Patterson at times added insteresting elements to the story which were interesting but I felt had nothing to do with the book. Maybe he was trying to hint of certain things coming on the horizion in future books. There were times I felt certain parts were rushed especially near the ending. After reading this book I felt if I hadn't read any previous Alex Cross novels I would of cared less about this book.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Another Great Patterson! Jan. 18 2004
By Ed Mich
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I have read a large handful of books by James Patterson, and I have read an even smaller handful of books by James Patterson that I have not liked at all. I did not like "Hide and Seek," I thought that "Cradle and All," and "The Lake House" were a little weak. I am reading "The Midnight Club," right now and that is not proving to be a good sign. But "Four Blind Mice," I liked. I really like the Alex Cross books. I am not reading them in any order, but I understand what is happening in the pervious books. I liked the story in "Four Blind Mice." I was also surprised with the outcome. The answer to the mysteries outcome, and the outcome on a personal note of Alex Cross.
The beginning of "Four Blind Mice" takes place in a courtroom. The suspect is Ellis Cooper, and he is charged for triple murders. He is set for exacution. The real killers are named Thomas, Brownly, and Warren, also knowed as the Three Blind Mice from the war. We are then brought back to the hero of this seris, Alex Cross. He is resigning from the Washington D.C. police force, and getting ready for the FBI. His best friend John Sampson tells him about his friend Cooper, and Alex says that it is going to be his last case to try and prove him innocent. The chase then begins to try and find the real killers of the triple murder.
The bad side of the book was the return of the new love interest in Cross's life. Jamillia Hughes. She was introduced in a previous James Patterson book, but her relationship with Alex is more involved in this book. I thought that her part in this story was overlong and got to a point where I had enough of her character. There was about seven chapters in this book with just her and Alex.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Vintage Patterson Dec 30 2003
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Anybody who has read a Patterson novel will recognize the hackneyed props. A family member gets deathly sick and amazingly manages to recover. There is a mastermind behind the murders. Cross is in love with a perfect lady. And so forth. At least Patterson has managed to slightly tone down the godliness and inhuman perfection of Cross and his kids. You may be a bit surprised to discover that the younger son has yet to receive either canonization or a Nobel Prize, but he's only about two years old, so those will probably have to wait until the next novel.
The story, about stereotyped Viet Nam veterans who are troubled by the terrible events of the war blah blah blah, is loosely constructed and full of loose ends that never really come together. How, for example, were evidence and straw dolls so flawlessly planted in the homes of innocent victims? (Maybe that Little Alex is actually a criminal genius who did that? It would be welcome relief if he were.) After we have been persuaded that one of those victims was a paragon of virtue, we are told that he was actually a devil. Not very convincing. Not very interesting. None of this is. Your time would be much better spent with John Sanford.
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Most recent customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars another amazing book
Alex Cross and John Sampson have become my heros. To know that they can each find happiness through so much madness is food for the soul.
Published 3 days ago by Jackie Livie
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
this was an excellent book - I would read it again
Published 3 months ago by liz
5.0 out of 5 stars Good Read
Fast moving, past, present and a view of the future. Hard to accept that the army would not have been more up front. Good adventure
Published 3 months ago by jntame
5.0 out of 5 stars FOUR BLIND MICE
I adore reading James Patterson's Alex Cross novels. Some one gave me "Kill Alex Cross". I enjoyed it immensely, to the point that I am going through the series, from the... Read more
Published 6 months ago by R. W. SIMPSON
5.0 out of 5 stars Four Blind Mice
This was another great puzzler detective mystery with lots of twists and turns. I always enjoy the references to past characters and situations. Read more
Published 19 months ago by Wacad
3.0 out of 5 stars Four Blind Mice Doesn't Deliver
Alex Cross is back for an eighth installment in Patterson's thrilling series, only this time he's helping out his partner John Sampson look into a case in which an army buddy of... Read more
Published on Oct. 29 2011 by Blood, Sweat, & Carbs
4.0 out of 5 stars Don't be cross
The plot of this book is intriguing; far superior to those detailed in both "Roses are Red" and "Violets are Blue. Read more
Published on July 26 2004
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Blind Mice - Four Stars
This book has everything...action, adventure, romance and suspense. It shows an even more emotional side of Alex Cross when his Nana turns ill and his feelings deepen for Jamilla. Read more
Published on July 8 2004 by John H
5.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining
Not Gripping
Not from the pen of a Brilliant mind
Not Perfect
But an intresting read - and one that doesn't give it's endings away 1/2 the way through - You cannot... Read more
Published on May 18 2004
3.0 out of 5 stars Cotton Candy - Good Without Substance
The story moves rapidly. It is laced with violence and death, spiced with thought provoking sermons about capturing family moments and sprinkled with not so subtle jabs at the... Read more
Published on April 7 2004 by Robert M. Logan
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