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Four Blind Mice [Hardcover]

James Patterson
3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (201 customer reviews)

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Book Description

Nov. 18 2002 Alex Cross
Alex Cross is on his way to resign from the Washington Police when his partner John Sampson shows up at his door. One of Sampson's oldest friends has been framed for murder and, worse yet, is subject to the insular laws of the U.S. Army. The evidence is strong enough to send him to the gas chamber.

Cross and Sampson plunge into a case where military codes of honor conceal dark currents of revenge and ambition, and the men controlling the moves have the best weapons and training the world can offer. Drawing on their years of street training and an almost telepathic mutual trust, Cross and Sampson go deep into military lines to confront the most terrifying-and lethal-killer they have ever encountered.


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From Amazon

In this latest thriller from perennial bestselling author James Patterson, Washington cop Alex Cross gets involved in his partner's effort to save the life of an old Army buddy who's facing execution for a horrendous and inexplicable murder spree in North Carolina. The Army's evidence against Sergeant Ellis Cooper, a decorated Vietnam vet, is overwhelming, which isn't surprising since it's all been planted by a quartet of killers whose reason for framing the erstwhile hero isn't revealed until long after they are. The big secret is who set the murderers loose, and in true cliffhanger fashion, Patterson keeps it under wraps until the very end. Meanwhile, his usual blend of action, violence, fast pacing and uninspired-though-serviceable prose prevail, and will probably do so all the way to the top of the bestseller lists. --Jane Adams

From Publishers Weekly

With Patterson continuing to move in unexpected directions (his next novel, The Jester, due out in March 2003, is a medieval adventure), it's a pleasure to see him touch home base with another Alex Cross thriller this one the best Cross yet. The mice of the title are three homicidal Army Rangers, Vietnam vets, and their mysterious controller; as is usual in the Cross novels, we know this much sooner than does the black Washington, D.C., detective, who gets involved when an army careerist, Sgt. Ellis Cooper, an old pal of Cross's colleague and best friend, John Sampson, is found guilty at military trial for the brutal murder of three women, but claims innocence. Traveling to North Carolina, where Cooper awaits execution, and to Fort Bragg to investigate, Cross and Sampson encounter stonewalling among the military which only intensifies as they uncover a pattern of other military men executed for like crimes they may not have committed. As the duo visits West Point, they confront an even thicker "gray" wall of silence. Meanwhile, the killers strike again, and when Cross and Sampson identify them, the Rangers begin hunting the cops. The action leads, as is Patterson's custom, to a firecracker string of climaxes; the finale finds Cross handcuffed and stripped naked in deep woods, about to be killed. Throughout, Patterson expertly balances the conspiratorial action with intriguing developments in Cross's domestic life, including health problems for his family's anchor, the elderly Nana, and growing romance between him and a California cop. Everything clicks in this novel, from Patterson's patented short chapters (115 here) to the whiplash plotting. This may not be high lit, but it sure is entertainment.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Four Blind Mice March 7 2013
By Wacad
Format:Kindle Edition
This was another great puzzler detective mystery with lots of twists and turns. I always enjoy the references to past characters and situations. This helps new readers catch up and reminds us diehards where things began.
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Format:Hardcover
I was VERY disappointed in VIOLETS ARE BLUE and I swore I'd never read another James Pattersn again, well I lied to myself really, THE BEACH HOUSE was okay and then I decided that every author deserves a second chance (though I think some people give him too many).
FOUR BLIND MICE puts Alex Cross back to his normal self. He's logical again, smart again, and the kind that actually needs help again, and Sampson has a big role in this book unlike the past two Cross novels.
The book is very discriptive and grabs your attention from the get go. The book is action packed and I can't help but admit that the book is heart pounding and keep this in mind "expect the unexpected" because this book is full of plot twist.
For those who've been keeping up with the Cross series, good, because you know how important Sampson is, well this book effects Sampson more than Cross this time around. Whild this doesn't seem like the best idea, it shows that Patterson actually has something in store for all his characters.
This is possibly by far one of the better Cross books. To be truthful I didn't have that much faith in this book, but it was surprisingly good.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Four Blind Mice Doesn't Deliver Oct. 29 2011
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Alex Cross is back for an eighth installment in Patterson's thrilling series, only this time he's helping out his partner John Sampson look into a case in which an army buddy of Sampson's is facing execution for triple murder in North Carolina. The army's evidence is strong, so Cross and Sampson have to race against the clock to try and prove that the convicted man is actually innocent. They quickly discover that Sampson's friend has been set up, as have a number of other soldiers, and the question becomes, by who?

Personally I found this installment less effective than its predecessors. It is typical fast paced Patterson, but I simply didn't care for the army cross over plot.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Don't be cross July 26 2004
By A Customer
Format:Audio Cassette
The plot of this book is intriguing; far superior to those detailed in both "Roses are Red" and "Violets are Blue." In short, Cross's partner, John Sampson, faces a personal crisis: his old army superior is on trial for murder. In typical Patterson style, he is, of course, innocent. Sampson knows this and enlists (no army pun intended) the aide of Cross to help solve this travesty. The deeper they dig into this frame up, they bigger the conspiracy they uncover. Many more murders bearing striking similarity to that of their current case are found (big surprise!). It is learned that this string of murders goes all the way back to Vietnam...Like always, you get a fast-paced book and numerous chapters from the killer's perspective. Also recommended: BARK OF THE DOGWOOD
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3.0 out of 5 stars Cotton Candy - Good Without Substance April 7 2004
Format:Hardcover
The story moves rapidly. It is laced with violence and death, spiced with thought provoking sermons about capturing family moments and sprinkled with not so subtle jabs at the business of war and some thereby employed.
If you need Spock-like logical characters, this tale is not for you. Patterson's Detective Cross will annoy you when he repeatedly puts himself in harm's way - sometimes alone. Likely equally annoying will be the fact the Patterson does not slow the plot by taking time to explain how Detective Cross and his partner John Sampson are able to spend weeks solving crime(s) with no apparent connection to the District of Columbia - their employer.
Read for entertainment, not to escape the ugliness that life brings to some.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Makes Me Fear for the "Public" April 6 2004
Format:Mass Market Paperback
How did this guy ever get on top? If the people who praise this writer ever read, Connelly, Hunter, Sanford etc. they would have a different perspective. His writing is so childish as to be embarrassing. He must have mentioned the size of the porterhouses they were eating 5 times. And who ever heard of being able to "hug" an inmate let alone one on death row? This may seem to be nitpicking but it is just an example of the tenor in whole book. Write for adults for god`s sake.
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4.0 out of 5 stars great March 24 2004
By A Customer
Format:Mass Market Paperback
this is one of my favorite james patterson books. action from beginning to end and still he gives his characters a human aspect.
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2.0 out of 5 stars one blind editor March 23 2004
Format:Mass Market Paperback
**spoilers**
"Four Blind Mice" by James Patterson -- who usually writes engaging mystery thrillers -- is an inferior offering that suffers from an exceedingly contrived plot and numerous storytelling errors. His editor should have shelved the entire book or, at least, done a better job of proofreading.
The novel is about a group of Vietnam veterans whose war experiences turned them into sadistic, callous killers. This commonplace stereotype is undermined because they mananaged (apparently) to control their murderous impulses for thirty years until the events of the novel begin. Then they set killing other vets by framing them for murder which results in death sentences. Eventually their nefarious deeds are uncovered by Alex Cross, Patterson's earstwhile protaganist.
The novel is full of plot and narrative errors. For example, at one point a cop is killed (for no real plot purpose), but apparently his body is never found and no one ever looks for him because that's the last it's mentioned. Similarly, while the murderers had video taped all their crimes, after they're caught there's no mention of these recordings. It's as though they never existed.
At numerous time the characters repeat dialog and information.
If Patterson really wanted to write a story about Vietnam vets and (I guess) the perils of capital punishment, I wish his editor had made him get the details right.
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