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French Women Don't Get Fat: The Secret of Eating for Pleasure Mass Market Paperback – Dec 26 2007


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; Reprint edition (Dec 26 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307387992
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307387998
  • Product Dimensions: 2.4 x 12 x 17.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 272 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #130,412 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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43 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Christie on Jan. 6 2005
Format: Hardcover
This is definitely a non-diet book! It is enjoyable to read, and the recipes look good. It's a book about life more than diet. It does, of course, talk quite a bit about proper attitudes toward food, but most of the changes Guiliano recommends are more than just to eating habits, and would involve real lifestyle makeovers for some people, such as preparing all of the food served in your house from scratch, never purchasing convenience foods, and being sure to make each meal a significant and satisfying event. I really like the concepts in this book, and my lifestyle will allow me to make many of the changes without disruption, especially since I already do make most foods from scratch-I have the time! However, I know at least one of my friends would not find abandoning the warehouse grocery stores in favour of daily trips (on foot) to local markets with her 3 children under 4 years of age in tow worth the effort. I highly recommend this book, especially if you are a bit of a foodie already, but I think some of the suggestions will be difficult to implement for families such as those with 2 working parents, 3 kids in hockey, and a volunteer commitment or two (Guiliano's mother had a nanny, a luxury few North American families experience). Guiliano shows that the French Paradox is not based on lucky DNA. It is, however, based on culture, and we are, after all, in Canada, not France, and there are not fresh food markets in walking distance of each of us, and many have little time for a satisfying lunch experience with friends and champagne. The North American lifestyle-and sometimes the weather-does not support the concepts in this book.Read more ›
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By FrKurt Messick HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on Feb. 24 2006
Format: Audio CD
As author Mireille Guiliano, executive of the company Champagne Veuve Clicquot (for those who don't know, one of the better Champagnes in the world), states, it is of course true that there are some French women who do get overweight. However, there are some common sense ideas that she learned as a child, and observed in seeing the general differences between her time in America and her time in France.
Guiliano works through her ideas on menu, diet, nutrition, exercise and lifestyle with anecdotal and personal experience rather than scientific studies; thus, some may disagree with her conclusions. Guiliano does not put out this book in any way to insult the American lifestyle -- on the contrary, Guiliano has had a love affair with the English language (French being her first language) and American culture since her school days.
One of the first stories Guiliano recounts is her school year spent in America, during what in this country would be known as high school. A prestigious award, she was excited to learn all about American culture; what she also learned about was chocolate chip cookies and brownies, and ended up returning home after a year abroad by at least 15 pounds heavier.
Guiliano reiterates some of the common aspects of French living that Americans have already recognised -- the benefits of red wine on cholesterol, for example, but haven't adapted their general eating habits to reflect good health. Indeed, some have used the use of red wine as an invitation to eat more!
Guiliano's recommendations are in many ways common sense. It makes sense to eat a variety of different kinds of food, and always (as French people who shop in small, street-side farmer's market kinds of shops will know) always pick the fruits and vegetables that are in season.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By "cmacfarlane6" on Jan. 6 2006
Format: Hardcover
A friend lent me her copy of this book and I am glad to have read it and glad not to have paid for it. Throughout I oscillated between complete agreement with her precepts and disbelief with her examples. Yes, we should eat in moderation, eat only the highest quality and savour what we eat. But no, most North American women are not going to walk to a market every day nor are we going to pick our own leaves for tisane. The author leaves it entirely to you to determine how you could follow her guidelines without living in France. I don't say this as a criticism of the book. She provides enough explanation of her approach to life so you could figure out how to adapt it when you don't live on an estate where you can pick your own chestnuts, blueberries, strawberries, etc. A few more examples of how she maintains this balance while living in the U.S. would have been helpful, but aren't necessary. There is also a gentle undercurrent of condescension in the book. So the overall message I took away from what she said and her way of saying it, is that if we do drink tisane we'll have to settle for the oh-so-inferior store-bought blends and realize that while we can imitate the French, we can never truly be French.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It's a great book about lifestyle choices and some fantastic attainable changes in your view on foods, what you eat and the way you eat. Love this book.
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By booklover on April 5 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It's an enjoyable read. It introduces a new way of thinking about food. Food is not your enemy but something to be enjoyed. It introduces the European womens approach to food and weight control. A must read to women who don't enjoy sweating at the gym everyday. Simple recipes. I highly recommend this book.
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