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  • Freud 99-036 Adjustable Tongue and Groove Router Bit Set, 1/2-Inch Shank
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Freud 99-036 Adjustable Tongue and Groove Router Bit Set, 1/2-Inch Shank

by Freud

List Price: CDN$ 128.02
Price: CDN$ 93.54 & FREE Shipping. Details
You Save: CDN$ 34.48 (27%)
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
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  • Features Freud's TiCo Hi-Density Carbide with Titanium for long life and a flawless finish
  • Adjustable at .002-Inch increments for stock thickness of 1/2-Inch to 1-1/4-Inch and groove widths of 7/32-Inch to 3/8-Inch
  • Freud's exclusive design features a tongue cutter with opposing shear angles to ensure a flawless finish
  • Perfect for producing Shaker style cabinet doors
  • Cuts all composition material, plywood, hardwoods and softwoods
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CDN$ 93.54 & FREE Shipping. Details Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

Freud 99-036 Adjustable Tongue and Groove Router Bit Set, 1/2-Inch Shank + Bosch RA1181 Benchtop Router Table
Price For Both: CDN$ 402.84

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Product Information

Technical Details
Part Number99-036
Item Weight354 g
Product Dimensions11.6 x 10.2 x 14.9 cm
Item model number99-036
Item Package Quantity1
Weight355 grams
Length11.6 centimeter
Width10.2 centimeter
Height14.9 centimeter
  
Additional Information
ASINB00006XMTT
Best Sellers Rank #3,518 in Tools & Home Improvement (See top 100)
Shipping Weight454 g
Date First AvailableSept. 16 2011
  
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Product Description

An industry leader for over 50 years, the Freud name equals quality, precision and craftsmanship. Freud router bits feature Freud made TiCo Hi-Density Carbide for maximum cutting life. Each bit is individually balanced, giving a cut above the rest. Trim carpenters, remodelers, and woodworking enthusiasts can now mill molding of almost any size, shape and configuration to add beautiful detail to match existing trim or create an all new look. All thats required is a 2-1/4 HP or larger router, a sturdy router table and fence, and a selection of bits from Freuds Architectural Molding Series. The adjustable tongue and groove bit set produces perfectly fitted tongue and groove joints for projects such as shaker style cabinet doors. Exclusive Freud design features a tongue cutter with opposing shear angles to ensure a flawless finish for stock thickness of 1/2" to 1-1/4". Groove cutter adjusts at .002" increments for groove widths of 7/32" to 3/8".

Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dave Halsall on Dec 30 2014
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Perfect, great quality!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John William Varndell on Aug. 17 2014
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Works great
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By Heather stone on May 1 2015
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Excellent!
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Richard Cinq-Mars on Dec 22 2012
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Facile à ajuster et bonne coupe. Agréable à utiliser. Demande peu d'effort de la part de la toupie. Ne surchauffe pas.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 570 reviews
72 of 73 people found the following review helpful
Freud Did It Again Jan. 20 2005
By Bob Feeser - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
At first I thought how could Freud have created an adjustable groove bit, with the seemingly single cutter, and make it adjustable. Then I discovered that it really was two cutters that were sandwiched together. Their carbide tip is a lot wider than the plates that hold them. Additionally they are offset, so when they are sandwiched without any spacers, they are just like having the one bit. With the included spacers, you can adjust that groove cutter to a nice range of sizes.

Additionally the two large cutters that make up the tongue bit are adjustable with the spacers that are provided. They are stacked on the bit so you don't have to go looking for them when you want to make a change.

I have a lot of Freud bits, and I have bought all of them from Amazon. The price and convenience can't be beat. The one complaint that I have is that Freud does not wrap these bits in a way that protects them from a UPS shipment. Do you know what UPS stands for? Unbelievably Pulverized Shipments. :-) With carbide tipped bits, which are super brittle, rolling around in the box, after they come loose from the snap together plastic carrying enclosure, they are left to do battle with one another. Consequently, check your faces for defects when you get them. Amazon has the greatest customer service.

All in all a great set of bits, highly recommended.
79 of 81 people found the following review helpful
Good joints, fiddly setup July 13 2004
By Roger A. Knopf - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Honestly I'd give this 5 stars because of the nice joints it makes, but it loses one for absence of documentation. Normally I would not expect documentation with a router bit but this one is pretty tricky to use and should come with instructions.
First, nowhere in the packaging or on Amazon's site does it tell you that the drawer front MUST be 3/4" and the side can be either 3/4" or 1/2".
Second, it comes with no instructions and the setup is not straightforward. I found good instructions on the web site of a different manufacturer of drawer lock bits.
Third, nowhere is it mentioned that one has to use a sacrificial zero clearance fence when making a drawer lock joint in cabinet grade plywood. I used a spare piece of poplar. My tip: get the height set using one sacrificial fence, then cut a new one for the cleanest joints, because it is crucial to have zero clearance between the top of the bit and the fence. Even 1/16" will result in significant tear-out.
Last, because the setup is so fiddly, I do not recommend you use this bit for just a couple joints. If you are going to do a run of drawers its worth the effort, but not for one or two.
68 of 69 people found the following review helpful
nice product July 29 2004
By A. Broaddus - Published on Amazon.com
In the past I have used my table saw tenoning jig to make shaker style cabinet doors, but I found that a really accurate set up was overly time consuming. I purchased the tongue and groove router bit set and found it to be a more accurate and quicker way to form these joints. With the large number of spacers provided, you can allow the perfect tolerance space for glue and the joints come out perfect. Use a variable speed router in a router table.
33 of 33 people found the following review helpful
Don't buy windows, make them Feb. 10 2004
By Bob Feeser - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This Freud 99-051 and 050 work as a set to give you complete sash making capabilities. My woodworking buying of equipment went into overdrive when I went into my local home center and saw how expensive it would be to replace the windows in my house. This Freud bit combination is making my intentions realizable. I made my first window sash and am ecstatic over how professional it looks. Each sash is the standard 1 3/8" thick, and has true divided light (French door style sash bars, and mullions) All done by using these two bits.
I must admit the instructions that come with the Freud bits leaves you a little dizzy. They eliminated all hand holding, and went into mechanical-arithmetic formulas for getting the job done. Then I discovered the CMT USA bit manufacturing instructions that are available at the CMTUSA.com web site under "How To" It is a lot more intuitive, whereas they give you step by step instructions. The thing about the CMT set is they are based on 5/8" of an inch spacing on one side, and 1/2" on the other. That makes for a lot of adjustment in doing the different stages. This Freud bit set, which is similar to the CMT in every way, except one. They are 9/16" on both sides, with 1/4" tongue area in the center.
You could make a casement sash with these bits, and simply build a frame to mount it in, and include the necessary configuring to allow for handles and opening mechanisms. That and a little weather-strip and you're set. This bit set also makes twin sashes for your standard double hungs. I bought a book here at Amazon called Windows and Skylights, and it went into a lot about making different style windows. Not about how to buy them, but about how to build them. Highly recommended book, listing suppliers of hardware, and the ins and outs of insulation properties of different styles. In that book the author states that using vinyl jamb liners with built in springs are preferred, and will save you a lot of time.
What I am actually going to do, is buy Honduras Mahogany, and make beautiful windows. I am looking for a good supplier of high quality solid polished brass for the locks and hardware. I could go on for hours, but this is supposed to be a review of the Freud bits, and it is.
These bits are not cheap, but if you plan on building lots of windows, and may possibly need to build more than one set, their strong carbide, and balanced, no vibration cut, will give you the quality you are looking for. It is nice to not have to sand the edges at all, or at least not very much, when they are as highly figured as these edges are.
The local largest window showroom has suggested that I carry a sample of the Mahogany creations in their showroom. I'm honored, and plan on doing that once I am confident in my own houses creations. Once you see what the truth is about the lack of true insulation properties of the common vinyl window, you will all the more want solid wood windows. Combining the insulating properties of solid wood, with the natural weather resistance of mahogany, and you have a combination that is hard to beat. I am leaning toward the single glass, and then doubling that on the inside with a removable storm panel, and tripling it with an exterior storm window. (That is a popular Pella design)
What is significantly different is with typical "insulated glass" windows, you have a vinyl shell, which conducts cold instead of insulating, and then passes that cold through the aluminum wedge that is sealed between the glass, which also transmits cold readily, on through to the inner glass, which is cold on the outer areas, and only warm on the inside center. Consequently the major window testing association, using a rating system that measures both the center of the glass on the inside, and the outside edges, and averages them. With your own wood windows, you eliminate that. In addition to Mahogany's natural wear properties (Decks are built from it without any finish put on it whatsoever) You have to look into Sikkens line of semi clear finishes. I coated my Cedar Addition with it five years ago and it looks as new right now as it did when I first applied it. It is expensive, but worth every dime.
Anyhow, get the Freud bit set, turn out your first sash, and get excited about the possibilities.
36 of 37 people found the following review helpful
excellent bit here Dec 14 2007
By A. Loechler - Published on Amazon.com
Here's the trick

It took me a bit of trial and error but here's the easiest was to set it up.

You need some test blocks. 4 at a minimum and you're probably going to need more of the exact thickness your final stock is going to be.

For the final result you're going to need to run one edge horizontal and one vertical against the fence. So the difficulty in adjustment is height and fence position. Don't try to adjust both at the same time.

First run 2 cuts horizontal (board flat on the table) flip one board over and fit the jointed edges together. They should be flush; if they are not raise or lower until they are flush. If the boards are proud your not deep enough if they are recessed your to deep. Once you have this dimension flush move onto the vertical (boards up against the fence).

You can repeat the exact same technique for getting the fence position just right. Once you think you've got it run some fresh edges in the horizontal and vertical just to make sure and your should have a perfect miter corner.

Now save and label and these test blocks for future setups. If you need to miter the same thickness material again your final test blocks will make setup again a breeze.

I needed to do several fake beams along the ceiling the some corners. Doing 10' miters is tough own but this bit made it much easier during assembly.

Be aware of grain direction and make sure you not going against it; you will tear out and possible wreck your miter.