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Friday's Child [Paperback]

Georgette Heyer
4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
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Book Description

April 1 2008
"A lightsome, brightsome comedy." - Kirkus Reviews

"Nimble, light-hearted chronicle of high London society in the time of the Regency." - The New Yorker

Georgette Heyer's sparkling romances have charmed and delighted millions of readers. Her characters brilliantly illuminate one of the most exciting and fascinating eras of English history-when drawing rooms sparkled with well-dressed nobility and romantic intrigues ruled the day. Heyer's heroines are smart and independent; her heroes are dashing noblemen who know how to handle a horse, fight a duel, or address a lady. And her sense of humor is legendary.

When the incomparable Miss Milbourne spurns the impetuous Lord Sherington's marriage proposal (she laughs at him-laughs!) he vows to marry the next female he encounters, who happens to be the young, penniless Miss Hero Wantage, who has adored him all her life. Whisking her off to London, Sherry discovers there is no end to the scrapes his young, green bride can get into, and she discovers the excitement and glamorous social scene of the ton. Not until a deep misunderstanding erupts and Sherry almost loses his bride, does he plumb the depths of his own heart, and surprises himself with the love he finds there.

"Reading Georgette Heyer is the next best thing to reading Jane Austen." - Publishers Weekly

Georgette Heyer (1902-1974) wrote over fifty novels, including Regency romances, mysteries, and historical fiction. She was known as the Queen of Regency romance, and was legendary for her research, historical accuracy, and her extraordinary plots and characterizations.

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Friday's Child + The Grand Sophy + The Reluctant Widow
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Review

It would, I think, be difficult to read this book without a smile on your face. The antics of the happy couple and their supporters and detractors seem delightfully silly compared with most romance fare today. If you are in need of a few hours of escape, I heartily recommend "Friday's Child" by Georgette Heyer. (Julie Queue My Review 2008-05-20)

Friday's Child is a cut above the rest, which is saying quite a lot since this is Georgette Heyer we're talking about and all her books happen to be fantastic. Friday's Child is filled with likable characters that stick with you and witty dialogue that will make you laugh out loud. (Katie Trattner Blog Critics 2008-06-02)

Sparkling with wit, filled to the brim with wonderfully developed characters and with Heyer's expert eye capturing the atmosphere with great accuracy, the book is a must-read for anyone who reads, period! (Rashmi Srinivas A Book Blogger's Diary 2008-06-09)

I cannot count the number of times I have read and re-read Friday's Child; and each re-reading is still a joy. So vivid are the characters, so real the world Heyer recreates that a return visit never fails to entertain. (Hilary Williamson Book Loons 2008-06-16)

The characters are interesting, likable, and believable and the dialogue between them is a high point of the book. I recommend Friday's Child to anyone who wishes that Jane Austen had written more books. (Kim Izzat Good Clean Reads 2008-09-03)

I really enjoyed Friday's Child and can't wait to delve into my next GH novel. (Ames Book Binge 2008-07-14)

Friday's Child is a wonderful tale of regency England by master storyteller, Georgette Heyer... If you are in a mood for great comedy and endearing characters, Friday's Child is the book for you! (Kate Garrrabant Ramblings on Romance 2008-07-28)

This is Jane Austen as presented on the Carol Burnett show and it's more fun than a bag of cats. (Orin Judd Brothers Judd 2008-10-02)

About the Author

The late Georgette Heyer was a very private woman. Her novels have charmed and delighted millions of readers for decades, though she rarely reached out to the public to discuss her works or personal life. She was born in Wimbledon in August 1902. She wrote her first novel, The Black Moth, at the age of seventeen to amuse her convalescent brother; it was published in 1921 and became an instant success.

Heyer published 56 books over the next 53 years, until herdeath from lung cancer in 1974. Her work included Regency romances, mysteries and historical fiction. Known as the Queen of Regency romance, Heyer was legendary for her research, historical accuracy and her extraordinary plots and characterizations. Her last book, My Lord John, was published posthumously in 1975. She was married to George Ronald Rougier, a barrister, and they had one son, Richard.

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Customer Reviews

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4.7 out of 5 stars
4.7 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars gentle and fun favourite March 9 2004
Format:Paperback
I read my first "regency romance" from Ms. Heyer at the age of 13, and a few decades later still go back to my favourites. This story is definately one of them.
For anyone who isn't already a fan of Georgette Heyer's largest group of books, this wonderful lady, writing in early and mid 20th-century England, produced a glorious collection of romances set in Regency England,(while all the time despising these best-selling books that took her away from the straight historical books she really wanted to write, but wrote more slowly.) (Oh yes, she also wrote some pretty good murder mysteries too, but this isn't one of them.)
Her many fans are really pleased she did have these economic needs, because we find her romantic novels enjoyable again and again, and don't care about a few (paltry) flaws.
Georgette Heyer's romances stand out from all others, to me anyway, because of the great sense of humour and wit that makes all of the books great fun, the easy to read style that never becomes banal, and plots which, although always happy-ending and sometimes rather similar, are never, ever, boring. If you like romances that are well-written, without taking themselves too seriously, and you're happy to know the right guy will always get the (sometimes wrong, but always feisty, and never insipid) heroine, try her books. You'll likely get hooked, and then be delighted to find there's plenty more (though not always in print).
I probably call this book 'gentle' because the hero isn't apparently hateful, or offensive or caustic, just very likeable and somewhat thoughtless.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good! June 23 2014
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Typical Georgette Heyer! Kept me guessing right up to the end. Was really engrossed in it. I would recommend this book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars laughed out loud July 26 2014
By Ibiene
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
One of Heyer's best. I literally laughed out loud while reading this book. The characters were refreshing; I was sorry when it ended.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.4 out of 5 stars  95 reviews
60 of 60 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Friday's Child is loving and giving July 6 2000
By "chelsea_christenson" - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
The opening scene of Sherry trying to propose to the Toast of London is a grabber, and the story goes charging off from there. Scorned and needing a wife to gain control of his finances, Sherry vows to marry the first woman he meets. That turns out to be Hero Wantage, the neglected poor relation of his neighbors who tagged after him as a child and still gives him devoted loyalty. She is thrilled to be a London lady, although she hasn't the least idea how to go about it. Although this looks like a romance, this is really the story of a young man learning to grow up. Sherry is essentially good-hearted but selfish; he doesn't want the responsibility of looking after a wife. This would be fine if he married a woman who was up to snuff, but his Kitten is decidely not. While Sherry's friends (a superb collection of supporting characters) look out for her as best they can, eventually it's time for Sherry to do the job himself. The finale, with various plot threads coming together with screwball abandon, is a triumph.
38 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fun jaunt with naive heroine learning London Ways March 1 2003
By A. Woodley - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
This is one of Heyer's longer books and it is packed full of wonderful characters as only Heyer can write them. The Heroine is the impetuous Sherry, who when rejected by the 'love' of his life Isabella, vows to marry the first woman he sees. This happens to be his young playmate, Hero Wantage. She is a bit younger than Sherry (who is already rather young himself) and both are rather naive about life in general.
Sherry and Sherry's friends believe they can just carry with their lives as things were even though Sherry is married and Hero is quite happy for that to happen too - only as it turns out London is a lot bigger and a lot less easy for her to navigate in her usual good natured way. She gets fleeced by card sharps and has to be rescued from any number of scrapes by an increasingly worried and agitated and finally angry Sherry.
What makes this such a good read is that the humour running through it - Hero is a great character, and Sherry's friends are also fun - but underneath it is a very good story about growing up - becoming responsible and facing up to your responsibilities. It also has a complex mix of characters who keep stumbling over one anotherand interfering with each other's plans - and Heyer does this so well.
If you like Friday's Child you will probably also enjoy Cotillion and Convenient Marriage also by Heyer.
30 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars gentle and fun favourite March 9 2004
By Hilary Kitson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I read my first "regency romance" from Ms. Heyer at the age of 13, and a few decades later still go back to my favourites. This story is definately one of them.
For anyone who isn't already a fan of Georgette Heyer's largest group of books, this wonderful lady, writing in early and mid 20th-century England, produced a glorious collection of romances set in Regency England,(while all the time despising these best-selling books that took her away from the straight historical books she really wanted to write, but wrote more slowly.) (Oh yes, she also wrote some pretty good murder mysteries too, but this isn't one of them.)
Her many fans are really pleased she did have these economic needs, because we find her romantic novels enjoyable again and again, and don't care about a few (paltry) flaws.
Georgette Heyer's romances stand out from all others, to me anyway, because of the great sense of humour and wit that makes all of the books great fun, the easy to read style that never becomes banal, and plots which, although always happy-ending and sometimes rather similar, are never, ever, boring. If you like romances that are well-written, without taking themselves too seriously, and you're happy to know the right guy will always get the (sometimes wrong, but always feisty, and never insipid) heroine, try her books. You'll likely get hooked, and then be delighted to find there's plenty more (though not always in print).
I probably call this book 'gentle' because the hero isn't apparently hateful, or offensive or caustic, just very likeable and somewhat thoughtless. There is one truly bad guy, whose inner wickedness is revealed gradually, and that anyone familiar with Heyer's books will pleasantly anticipate eventually getting his due, and there's an unpleasant (and very silly) mother-in-law, but this book has much less black/white stereotyping than some of Ms.Heyer's other books.
What keeps me enjoying "Friday's Child" again and again is the broad range of characters included in the tale. With the hero's three friends, all very clearly different, playing their own parts in the twists and turns of the plot and general misunderstandings, plus various relatives contributing their own little cameos, there's plenty of variety in the story. After reading this book I always feel that I've met (or meet again) a nice assortment of different characters, none of them perfect, but most very likeable, with a few wonderfully unlikeable for contrast.
Like all of Georgette Heyer's Regency stories you get a great (and well-researched) trip back into Society life during the Regency period, but this typically-Heyer gem gives you more. There's the wonderful range of characters you are shown, plus more enjoyment of the of the secondary personalities . In this picture of Regency England you learn more than the all-important niceties of "good ton" and "NOT good ton", you are introduced to some varied aspects of society. The nobility you meet include the honest and the phony, the noble-but-nasty and the basically-decent, the thoughtful and impulsive, sensible and silly, and you also glimpse characters from the rest of society, living in a version of England that's very different from that of the main protagonists.
All in all, this is another glorious read from the much loved Georgette Heyer. If you've read her other books, be prepared for some delightful hours, and if this is a more mellow read than some, with a bit less life-and-death drama, the pleasure is no less, with lots of fun and variety, and if you roughly guess the ending (pure Heyer) there's a load of very believable ups-and-downs before you get there. If you are new to this author, (and you don't despise happy endings), you're in for much fun.
19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My Very Favorite Heyer! Aug. 8 2000
By Jocelyn L. Smith - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book's hero is quite different from the bored, sophisticated older man that Heyer usually casts in that role. Instead, "Sherry" is a gentleman in his early twenties who must marry to take control of his fortune from his unscrupulous uncle. When his current infatuation rejects his proposal, Sherry, miffed, finds a childhood friend in the village (Hero Wantage, "not quite seventeen") and marries her instead. Sherry's close friends all play a major role in the story and are admirably drawn, as are the hero and heroine. There are plenty of comic moments, the romance is quite believably developed, and I found myself laughing aloud more than once at the scrapes Hero keeps getting herself into. This is Ms. Heyer at her very best, and an excellent first-time pick for those Regency readers who wonder what all the fuss is about this grande dame of period romance.
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great fun Dec 11 2002
By kallan - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This is a great story. It's light-hearted and full of fun, but has its serious side and some truly touching moments as well.
Sherry (Viscount Sheringham) has just has his proposal of marriage spurned by the Incomparable Isabella. Further put out of temper by his dreadful mother and uncle, he storms back to London, vowing to marry the first woman he sees. That happens to be Hero, a sixteen-year-old orphaned neighbour who has been devoted to him ever since they were children. Both are happy with his plan, Sherry because it will put him in control of his fortune and Hero because it gives her an escape from the tyranny of the cousins she lives with. But Sherry, who is both wild and irresponsible, does not find it as easy to have a wife as he thought it would be, while Hero, who was never trained for the position she now holds, finds herself falling into one disaster after another. She finds her position growing ever more difficult, especially when she comes to realise that she loves Sherry, but he does not seem to love her. When yet another social faux pas seems like the final straw for her and Sherry's marriage, she takes desperate action that might save the day . . . or will it?
Sherry and Hero are great characters, and make a lovely couple. Both are kind-hearted, irresponsible, hedonistic and hot-tempered. I also love this book for Sherry's friends. Gil is the token sensible person, Ferdy is well-mannered but thick, and George is a highly romantic figure, desperately in love with Isabella and forever trying to pick fights. The back-and-forth between Hero, Isabella, and Sherry and his friends is what really makes this book. Heyer displays her talent for comedy and for choosing exactly the right word to perfection.
Does everything turn out well in the end? Of course it does - but not in the way you might expect. Keep an eye out for the pickpocket turned groom.
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