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From Time Immemorial: The Origins of the Arab-Jewish Conflict Over Palestine Paperback – Apr 1993


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 601 pages
  • Publisher: J K a P Pubns (April 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0963624202
  • ISBN-13: 978-0963624208
  • Product Dimensions: 3.8 x 14 x 21 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 662 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (43 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #67,252 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"...will change the mind of our generation. If understood, it could also affect the history of the future." -- New Republic

"A remarkable document in itself. . . . The refugees are not the problem but the excuse." -- Washington Post Book World

"Contains much valuable information...deserving the attention of anyone seriously concerned with the Palestinian problem." -- S.D. Goitein, The Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton

"This book is a historical event in itself..." -- Barbara Tuchman

About the Author

Joan Peters has written and lectured widely on the Middle East, Central America, and the Soviet Union. She has contributed to Harper's, Commentary, The New Republic, The New Leader, and other periodicals, and has served as White House consultant on the Middle East.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
It was not until this book was well under way that I reluctantly confronted the historical factors underlying the "Palestinian problem." Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By "belize042" on Dec 12 2002
Format: Paperback
Exhaustively researched and footnoted, Peters' book explodes numerous myths about the Middle East, past and present. Those facts about the Arab-Jewish conflict that "everyone knows?" Most of them are false.
Although thorough to a fault, the book is far from a chore to read. It's as hard to put down as some good novels, actually. And for those seeking more, the lengthy footnotes and bibliography provide an enormous wealth of resources.
Truly, you don't know enough about the conflict, which rages to this day, until you've read this book. It's that essential.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Oct. 21 2003
Format: Paperback
There is fascinating research and original source material here that the author uncovered during several years of research. She claims to have changed her mind after looking into the issue. I believe her. To read this book is to be flooded with an avalanche of facts. Almost 100 pages of footnotes. And the realization that many of those debating the issue of Israel, the Palestinians, and the West Bank ignore much of history. The first casualty of any war is the truth, but the truth is that this book is worth reading for the viewpoint and hard work of the author in bringing some little-known facts to light. I have yet to see a similarly inspired work from the other side - and I've been looking...
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Dec 14 2001
Format: Paperback
Though Peters is ruthlessly partisan in her selection of source material, she raises incredibly important questions about the often overlooked issues of Arab in-migration during the British Mandate and rather than merely limiting the focus to just Palestinian refugees, she widens the view to all refugees in the twentieth century and demonstrates that for very political reasons the Arabs of Palestine who were refugees after the 1948 War of Independence were not handled in the same way that nearly every other group was, namely resettlement and assimilation.
Her work has some flaws, to be sure, but nearly every book on this subject that attempts thoughtful analysis is going to suffer to some extent from the author's personal bias. What is remarkable is that she started the book very clearly on one side of the issue and, after her research, she had come a full 180 degrees to the opposite perspective.
I rate it highly because it asks questions no one seems to be addressing and points out facts and observations that no one seems to be talking about....
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Rabbi Noach Zaner on Nov. 15 2001
Format: Paperback
Joan Peters has dealt with a topic that many would prefer to ignore...namely "truth". Lies , when told time and time again, appear to be true; but they only APPEAR to be true. Deep down, beneath all the rhetoric, truth can be found if one really searches for it. Ms Peters has done just that. She has dug deep to discover the truth concerning the major issues in the Arab - Israel conflict. Ironically, she set out to bring the Israelis to justice "for their dispicable treatment of the Palestinian refugees" and discovered /learned that this was nothing more than a major "smokescreen" hiding a much greater issue. Her documentation is thorough and one can only wonder why the information, the facts, that she, and so many others have uncovered, are not in circulation in today's political spectrum. Could it be that the world does not want to know the truth? If you are looking for facts, regarding the Arab - Israel conflict, this is the best book out there. However, it may have an adverse effect upon you. You just might find yourself becoming very upset while watching the evening news' coverage of what is taking place in Israel. The media bias is obvious.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Alyssa A. Lappen on Oct. 9 2001
Format: Paperback
Peters spent 7 years searching Arab, United Nations, League of Nations, British, French, Israeli, Turkish and Ottoman and other records. This book, with more than 1,800 citations, should be required reading for every Middle East reporter.
Peters shows that for 70 years before Israel's independence, there was considerable Arab immigration INTO Palestine--a history confirmed among others by Arieh Avneri's pre-Peters book, Claim of Dispossession: Jewish Land Settlement and the Arabs 1878-1948. This began in 1878, when Jewish settlers joined tens of thousands of Jews whose families lived in Palestine for two millennia after it was sacked by the Romans in 70 AD.
She shows at length that while Palestine was later conquered by a long parade of others--including Muslims, Crusaders, Saracens, and finally the Ottoman Empire--none ever drove the Jews out completely.
Peters provides documentation by many non-Jewish 19th century travelers, including Mark Twain (Innocents Abroad) and French and British envoys, of a desolate Palestine, whose small population included long-established Jewish communities in Jerusalem, Safed, Nablus, Jericho and other towns. In the 1870s, Jewish settlers from the Middle East and Europe began joining their co-religionists in Palestine. Arab immigration increased as Jewish development raised economic conditions far above those of neighboring Arab countries. Jewish farmers bought land at above-market prices from absentee effendi landlords in Egypt, Lebanon, Syria and elsewhere, employing both Arabs and Jews. Arabs also came for jobs in the government and building the railroads, roads and Haifa port.
Peters also notes a long history of Arab aggression against Israel, and before that, Jews.
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