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Further Down The Old Plank Road

The Chieftains Audio CD
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
Price: CDN$ 4.08
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Frequently Bought Together

Further Down The Old Plank Road + Down The Old Plank Road - The Nashville Sessions + Voice Of Ages - Deluxe Edition
Price For All Three: CDN$ 27.57

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Product Details


1. Rosc Catha Na Mumhain
2. Arkansas Traveller
3. The Wild Irishman
4. The Moonshiner
5. I'm A Ramber I'm A Gambler
6. The Cheatin' Waltz
7. Bandit of Love
8. The Squid Jiggin' Ground
9. Larry O'Gaff
10. The Fisher's Hornpipe
11. The Devil's Dream
12. Talk About Sufferin'
13. Man of the House
14. The Raggle Taggle Gypsy
15. Jordan Am A Hard Road To Travel
16. Hick's Farewell
17. Shady Grove
18. The Girl I Left Behind in Tennessee
19. Rosc Catha Na Mumhain / Arkansas Traveller / The Wild Irishman
20. Lambs in the Greenfields
See all 29 tracks on this disc

Product Description

Amazon.ca

As on Another Country (1992) and The Old Plank Road (2002), the venerable Irish acoustic band celebrates the shared sources of Celtic music and America's Appalachian folk/old-timey/bluegrass canon. That several of the guest players are veterans of all three sets lends a note of continuity to the palpable joy of discovery that fairly leaps from every track. Highlights are non-stop, but Allison Moorer's doom-laden vocal on "Hick's Farewell" raises goose-flesh, as does Emmylou Harris' "Lambs In The Greenfield," while Don Williams' treatment of an old Scottish ballad, "Wild Mountain Thyme," reveals a sturdy, unsentimental masculinity. The Chieftains are generous hosts throughout, often taking a back seat so their collaborators may shine. A poignant note: harpist and multi-instrumentalist Derek Bell, a longtime Chieftains member, died just after the Plank Road sessions were completed. That these were destined to be among his final recordings makes them all the more worthy of treasuring. --Christina Roden

Product Description

As on Another Country and The Old Plank Road , the venerable Irish acoustic band celebrates the shared sources of Celtic music and America's Appalachian folk-bluegrass canon with Raggle Taggle Gypsy; Jordan Is a Hard Road to Travel; Shady Grove; Lambs in the Greenfield; Hick's Farewell; Wild Mountain Thyme; The Lily of the West , and more.

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Most helpful customer reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars further is better Oct. 1 2003
By A Customer
Format:Audio CD
I found the first cd by the chieftains recorded in Nashville to lack a cohesiveness. It also, in my opinion, suffered from the excess of having a 10+ minute instrumental song at the end that seemed to drone on and on. This one "works" better for me and is entertaining and enjoyable from start to finish. An excellent variety of collaborating artists with everything from the country baritone of Don Williams to the beautiful vocal instrument of Emmylou Harris's voice. Highly recommended for Chieftain and country (real country) music fans alike.
I was surprised that there was no mention of the passing of Derek Bell in the liner notes of the cd. Perhaps a tribute to him will be made in an upcoming cd.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good music, bad recording April 8 2004
By A Customer
Format:Audio CD
Something bad happened to the voice sound track for this recording. The instruments come through fine, and the music is very good, but for almost all of the vocals on the record, the voice of the person singing is a faint echo in the background. Heads should roll for this.
I recommend that you do not purchace this CD, just because of the bad recording. Unless you want to use it for Karioke, for which it is very well suited. The vocals seem to have been recorded well on the PBS special, so I would get the DVD instead.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Chieftains turn out another winner Sept. 20 2003
By A Customer
Format:Audio CD
Well, it looks like those old Irish rogues The Chieftains have managed to do it again - take two different but interrelated musical styles, find the best performers in the genre, and pair them up with their group to create a unique and oftentimes brilliant sound. With this take we return to the connection between Irish traditional and American country and bluegrass music, just like their last album, "Down the Old Plank Road" was - in fact, "Further Down the Old Plank Road" is the recording sessions they didn't have room to cram into the first one. And while with some other artists this would seem like an attempt to make money off of work they'd already done, in this case the work is just as high in quality as the first album was, therefore earning itself the merit of being well worth the surprisingly modest price tag.
This album has a wide variety of both Irish and American pieces on it, opening with the old standard "The Raggle Taggle Gypsy", performed with Nickel Creek to stunning results. Next comes the American folk song "Jordan is a Hard Road to Travel" with John Hiatt, and if it weren't for Hiatt's superbly raspy old-time voice this would pass as a traditional dance from back over on the Emerald Isle. Following this upbeat tune comes a mournful Southern song with Allison Moorer, the solemn "Hick's Farewell", her voice backed quietly by Paddy and his boys and attended to by the sorrowful wailing of Matt Molloy's flute. "Shady Grove" with Tim O'Brien has lyrics that are very American in nature but a tune that, like much of the material on this album, could have come right out of Ireland itself.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Way Down The Old Plank Road Dec 8 2003
By A Customer
Format:Audio CD
Both "Plank Road" CDs are great for fans of Irish/Old Time/Country music.
Highlights on this one, for me, include John Hiatt's version of the Uncle Dave Macon song Jordan is a Hard Road, and Doc Watson with the Chieftains.
The Nickle Creek version of Raggle Tagle Gypsy doesn't do it for me -- I've been spoiled by listening to the Planxty version for years.
All in all a great listen, with an interesting historical connection.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.6 out of 5 stars  16 reviews
76 of 77 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Chieftains turn out another winner Sept. 20 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Well, it looks like those old Irish rogues The Chieftains have managed to do it again - take two different but interrelated musical styles, find the best performers in the genre, and pair them up with their group to create a unique and oftentimes brilliant sound. With this take we return to the connection between Irish traditional and American country and bluegrass music, just like their last album, "Down the Old Plank Road" was - in fact, "Further Down the Old Plank Road" is the recording sessions they didn't have room to cram into the first one. And while with some other artists this would seem like an attempt to make money off of work they'd already done, in this case the work is just as high in quality as the first album was, therefore earning itself the merit of being well worth the surprisingly modest price tag.
This album has a wide variety of both Irish and American pieces on it, opening with the old standard "The Raggle Taggle Gypsy", performed with Nickel Creek to stunning results. Next comes the American folk song "Jordan is a Hard Road to Travel" with John Hiatt, and if it weren't for Hiatt's superbly raspy old-time voice this would pass as a traditional dance from back over on the Emerald Isle. Following this upbeat tune comes a mournful Southern song with Allison Moorer, the solemn "Hick's Farewell", her voice backed quietly by Paddy and his boys and attended to by the sorrowful wailing of Matt Molloy's flute. "Shady Grove" with Tim O'Brien has lyrics that are very American in nature but a tune that, like much of the material on this album, could have come right out of Ireland itself.
The incomparable John Prine accompanies The Chieftains on "The Girl I Left Behind", employing his once-twangy but now warmer and deeper voice to a song that sounds like a lot of his other work - not a bad thing, mind you. The following set with Jerry Douglas contains the Irish tunes "Rosc Catha Na Mumhain" and "The Wild Irishman", both played superbly, as well as an unexpected treat - "The Arkansas Traveler", undoubtedly one of the best-known old-time folk songs that transforms the track from a set of Celtic tunes to a sort of Irish hoedown, as the liner notes put it. After that comes a superbly sad/sweet Irish song, "Lambs in the Greenfield", played with a past Chieftains collaborator Emmylou Harris, to lovely results. In the space of Band 8 Joe Ely shows up with his roguishly rambling voice, singing two tunes that suit his demeanor well - "The Moonshiner" and "I'm a Rambler".
Country legend Don Williams turns up on this album to sing that beautiful old Irish ballad, "Wild Mountain Thyme" with his virtually-trademark deep country voice that gives the classic air a new dimension. Chet Atkins plays on "Chief O'Neill's Hornpipe", which if memory serves was actually recorded back on The Chieftains' first bluegrass/country endeavor, "Another Country", and could be considered the single cheap shot on the album, even though the collaboration is still very high quality. Band 11 contains Carlene Carter's "Bandit of Love" from 1980, sung by the composer and The Chieftains' own "The Cheatin' Waltz", the former taking up a much longer time slot than the latter. The famous Nitty Gritty Dirt Band gives a spirited performance of "The Squid-Jiggin' Ground", a lively little song rather peculiar in subject but catchy in tune, its words having been set to the Irish Larry O'Gaff's Jig by immigrants to Newfoundland, Canada.
Patty Loveless delivers a wailing rendition of "Three Little Babes", an anguish-filled variant of an old English air sung in the Appalachian Mountains. On track 14 Doc Watson plays a sprightly hornpipe popular on both sides of the Atlantic, "The Fisherman's Hornpipe", followed by another famous tune, "Devil's Dream." Long-time friend of The Chieftains Ricky Skaggs lays down another soulful Southern song, "Talk About Sufferin'", written in the gospel singing tradition of the American southeast. The final tune, "The Lily of the West", has been sung by The Chieftains on a past album, "The Long Black Veil", in collaboration with Mark Knopfler. But sung here to a different tune with somewhat altered lyrics by Rosanne Cash, Johnny "The Man in Black" Cash's daughter, the song takes on an entirely different feel, to my ears less appealing than Knopfler's rendition but still enjoyable.
All in all, "Further Down the Old Plank Road" is anything but an attempt to administer one last whack to a long-dead horse, to paraphrase the liner notes of "Water from the Well" (also a great album). Even though American music is the predominate style on the album, it's still a real treat for Chieftains fans and a great listen for any fan of traditional Irish, bluegrass, or country music, or any of the performers above for that matter. Highly recommended!
20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars further is better Oct. 1 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I found the first cd by the chieftains recorded in Nashville to lack a cohesiveness. It also, in my opinion, suffered from the excess of having a 10+ minute instrumental song at the end that seemed to drone on and on. This one "works" better for me and is entertaining and enjoyable from start to finish. An excellent variety of collaborating artists with everything from the country baritone of Don Williams to the beautiful vocal instrument of Emmylou Harris's voice. Highly recommended for Chieftain and country (real country) music fans alike.
I was surprised that there was no mention of the passing of Derek Bell in the liner notes of the cd. Perhaps a tribute to him will be made in an upcoming cd.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Chieftains Merge Irish & Bluegrass Influences March 21 2005
By Steve Vrana - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
This follow-up to 2002's DOWN THE OLD PLANK ROAD doesn't deviate from that album's successful formula of combining traditional Irish music with bluegrass and old timey country music.

Highlights include Tim O'Brien's foot-stomping rendition of "Shady Grove, John Prine's plaintive "The Girl I Left Behind," Ricky Skaggs' "Talk About Suffering/Man of the House" and Nickel Creek's performance of the centuries' old "Raggle Taggle Gypsy."

Several of these songs were not originally recorded for this album. "Fishmerman's Hornpipe/The Devil's Dream," which features the lightning fingers of Doc Watson, was recorded in 1980-81. Four other tracks (9-12) were recorded in 1992, presumably during the sessions for the 1992 release ANOTHER COUNTRY.

Overall, this is a thoroughly satisfying album from Ireland's best ambassadors of Irish music. [Running time 55:06] HIGHLY RECOMMENDED
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Further, better? July 13 2009
By Keegan R. Lerch - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Further down the old plank road, the sequel to "Down the old plank road:the Nashville sessions," is almost every part as good (if not better) than the original. Maybe it's because they used some younger musicians and artists on these sessions, but I feel like this album has a little more life than its predecessor.

With great guest artists like Nickel Creek, John Hiatt, John Prine, Emmylou Harris, Carlene Carter, the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Edgar Meyer, Bela Fleck, Jerry Douglas, Doc Watson, Rosanne Cash, and Ricky Skaggs, HOW can you go wrong? These are some of the best and brightest in the country/bluegrass/folk scene. The Chieftans has become one of the greatest testaments to Celtic music's greatness, and themselves along with leader Paddy Moloney, have succeeded in preserving some of the best performed instrumental and vocal Celtic music out there.

The only two songs on this album that are somewhat 'stale' are "Hick's Farewell" with Alison Moorer and the tired sounding "Wild Mountain Thyme" sung by Don Williams. Other than these two tracks, this album is filled with some rip-roaring, good-time music accompanied by some heart-felt ballads.
5.0 out of 5 stars Chieftains!!! Wonderful ! July 7 2014
By Alice in Wonderland - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Love the Chieftains! and love this compilation of them playing with several other people!! Wonderful music!!
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