Green Mars (Mars Trilogy) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
CDN$ 19.81
+ CDN$ 6.49 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Buy with confidence. Excellent Customer Service & Return policy.Ships from USA. Please give between 2-5 week for delivery.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

GREEN MARS Hardcover – Mar 1 1994


See all 15 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 87.45 CDN$ 4.11

Amazon.ca: Spring 2015 Books Preview
Available from these sellers.



Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Spectra (March 1 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553096400
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553096408
  • Product Dimensions: 4.4 x 15.9 x 24.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 612 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (68 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #578,295 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Amazon

Kim Stanley Robinson has earned a reputation as the master of Mars fiction, writing books that are scientific, sociological and, best yet, fantastic. Green Mars continues the story of humans settling the planet in a process called "terraforming." In Red Mars, the initial work in the trilogy, the first 100 scientists chosen to explore the planet disintegrated in disagreement--in part because of pressures from forces on Earth. Some of the scientists formed a loose network underground. Green Mars, which won the 1994 Hugo Award, follows the development of the underground and the problems endemic to forming a new society. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

The sequel to Red Mars details an early 22nd-century Mars controlled by Earth's metanationals, gigantic corporations intent on exploiting Mars. Debate among the settlers--some native-born, some the surviving members of the First Hundred--is divided between the minimalist areoformists, who have come to love Mars in all its harshness, and the terraformists, who want to replicate Earth. As the surface of Mars warms and is seeded with genetically altered plants, the settlers await Earth's self-destruction, which they hope will give them a chance to claim their independence. They travel endlessly over every inch of Mars--no mean feat, since most of the First Hundred are criminals wanted for their roles in the failed revolt of 2061--with each kilometer and each group of settlers they meet described in laborious detail. When they're not traveling, these colonists contemplate the history of which they have been a part and which they can only partially recall as a result of their longevity treatments. With the collapse of Earth society and internecine battles among the metanationals, the Martian settlers liberate their cities and declare their planet free. This wide-ranging novel is loaded with all manner of scientific and historical detail, but the story bogs down under its very breadth and seems almost like a Martian year--twice as long as it needs to be. The next and final volume in the trilogy will be Blue Mars .
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dave Deubler on July 7 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Using Heinlein's classic The Moon is a Harsh Mistress as a blueprint, Robinson tries to portray a second Martian revolution in this sequel to his brilliant novel, Red Mars. Disappointingly, this volume is almost completely consumed by character and setting, perhaps trying to make up for the shortage of action, which doesn't really take off until the last few dozen pages. Admittedly, the crisply drawn characters and realistically invoked Martian landscapes were perhaps the best parts of the earlier book, but readers may remember that some of the best characters from Red Mars were killed off, and the new characters introduced are remarkably wooden and dull, while their contributions to the plot are so negligible that one suspects they were added merely as padding, and not because they needed to be there. As a result, this novel takes forever to get moving - the first 470 pages could easily be cut to a quarter of that length without any harm to the story whatever. In Red Mars the interior monologues informed the readers of the action taking place as well as providing intimate portraits of the men and women who colonized the planet. In this installment the monologues seem more like vague ruminations that don't move the plot at all (the first sentence of this review tells you more about the plot than the first couple of hundred pages of this tome), nor do they tell us anything terribly interesting about the characters, let alone make us like them. Robinson clearly had enough material here for a very short novel, and filled it out with the same techniques that worked so well for him in Red Mars, but by keeping the plot effectively a secret from his readers, he leaves us with nothing to do but admire the scenery and listen to some fairly unpleasant (even fanatical) people. While not exactly a bad book, it's a serious letdown from the majesty of Red Mars.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This second volume of Kim Stanley Robinson's Mars Trilogy is a very worthy Hugo winner. Although there are elements of RED MARS I did not like (which I'll not go into now), with RED MARS as a background, I found GREEN MARS to be brilliant. If you haven't read Red Mars, don't tackle this volume first.
KSR really did his homework in studying the social scientific aspects of his novel (as he did with the rest). The metanational and transnational corporations are a believable outgrowth of current economic trends and their reactions toward Mars and its denizens in GM logically follows their development in the novel. KSR also did a better job of staking out the various issues and ideologies involved in terraforming, giving the policy and political middle-ground between the Reds and the policy of the Transnational Authorities (which is terraforming as quickly as possible moving toward a viable atmosphere on Mars).
The Part entitled "What is to be Done" was excellently written and extremely realistic (even if I have trouble believing that with all the political elements represented that some didn't opt out because of ideological extremism). That the group left without any real political action plans made the section even more convincing. The culture of the youth born on Mars seen through the eyes of members of the First Hundred shows a wonderful sense of cultural development with all the elements it entails including genetics, the Martian environment, and how they were raised (interacting with the first two).
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The first book of Kim Stanley Robinson's epic trilogy, RED MARS, wone the 1993 Nebula Award for Best Novel. This sequel, GREEN MARS, won the 1994 Hugo Award. Except for the last Hugo, which went to a Harry Potter novel (something which will taint the award forever), this award is not given lightly. Green Mars deserved all the honors that could be heaped upon it. In some ways it reminds me of Peter Jackson's Two Towers film, in that it is a middle chapter in a much greater landmark saga.
Green Mars starts out about 40 years after the failed revolution by elements of the original settlers to free itself of the rule of Earth. That revolution caused much destruction and thousands of deaths but in the end it failed. It failed because there was no coordination among the disparate groups. Some were fighting to keep Mars as it was, some to change it, some were out merely to seize power for themselves. Now the legendary First Hundred settlers have been hunted down and reduced to just 39. Those that are alive must live in secret sanctuaries hidden throughout the landscape or take on fake identities. And all the while, Mars is beginning to show life on its surface.
Hope springs eternal, for the metanational corporations, the real force that controls Mars, from Earth, are about to embark on a civil war amongst themselves. Also, a new generation of Martians are coming of age and doing something their predecessors didn't. Organizing themselves into a united and coordinated front. Establishing goals and having patience for the right moment to strike. Kinda like a twelve step program for revolution.
In Green Mars, different parts of the book are divided into the perspective of the various characters.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most recent customer reviews



Feedback