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Game Development Essentials: An Introduction [Paperback]

Jeannie Novak

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Book Description

Aug. 17 2011 1111307652 978-1111307653 3
GAME DEVELOPMENT ESSENTIALS: AN INTRODUCTION, 3E is an authoritative, industry-driven introduction to the world of game development, with updates that keep readers current and well-prepared for a successful career in the field. This book not only examines content creation and the concepts behind development, but it also give readers a background on the evolution of game development and how it has become what it is today. GAME DEVELOPMENT ESSENTIALS also includes chapters on project management, development team roles and responsibilities, development cycle, marketing, maintenance, and the future of game development. With the same engaging writing style and examples that made the first two editions so popular, this new edition features all the latest games and game technology. Coverage of new game-related technology, development techniques, and the latest research in the field make this an invaluable resource for anyone entering the exciting, competitive, ever-changing world of game development.

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About the Author

Jeannie Novak is the lead author and series editor of the widely acclaimed GAME DEVELOPMENT ESSENTIALS series (with over 15 published titles), co-author of PLAY THE GAME: THE PARENT'S GUIDE TO VIDEO GAMES, and co-author of three pioneering books on the interactive entertainment industry--including CREATING INTERNET ENTERTAINMENT. She is also co-founder of Novy Unlimited and CEO of Kaleidospace, LLC (dbaIndiespace), providing curriculum development and consulting services for corporations, educators, and creative professionals in games, music, film, education, and technology.Novak served as director of the Game Art & Design and Media Arts & Animation programs at the Art Institute Online and has taught game courses at UCLA, Art Center College of Design, DeVry University, Westwood College, ITT Technical Institute, and the Academy of Entertainment & Technology at Santa Monica College. She holds a B.A. in mass communication/business administration from UCLA and an M.A. in communication management from the Annenberg School at USC. She also serves on the Online Gameplay Committee for the Academy of Interactive Arts &Sciences and has served on the executive boards of the International Game Developers Association (Los Angeles) and Women in Games International. An accomplished composer and performer, Novak was chosen as one of the 100 most influential people in technology by MicroTimesmagazine and has been profiled by CNN, Billboard Magazine, the Sundance Channel, Daily Variety, and the Los Angeles Times.

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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
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Amazon.com: 4.4 out of 5 stars  52 reviews
26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Good Way to Begin Dec 13 2009
By Estefano Palacios Topic - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
First of all, who is this book for?

When I first bought this book I thought I was in for a mind breaking tutorial or insight into game development, and considering all the great reviews, I think these expectations were completely normal. Reality is: the book will only teach you very, very essential stuff. So, if you already have any sort of experience in game development, or you have been a hardcore gamer looking to become a game developer, you probably know this stuff already. This book is great for teenagers who would love to become game developers or professionals in other areas looking to cross over. Still, if you are knowledgeable in gaming or game development, you may want to buy this book for formalize your knowledge into comprehensible data sets in your mind (this is how this book has served me the most), for the writing is clear, easily digestible, and the presentation of the whole deal is beautifully done.

What does this book talk about?

A lot of things! And this is one of the very best features of the book: it will guide you to every detail of game development, even if offers very little information on some topics, so you won't stay completely ignorant with this book. It talks about: the target market, history of games, gameplay, storytelling, characters, marketing, development process, the development team, etc... By the end of this book you will feel good about your understanding of games, even if it is at a small extend, because now you fell that you have your feet on the ground. This is another great feature: it never talks about game development as something easy. Actually, on the ending chapters, where the author talks about the development process, she makes a clear point on how crazy the whole deal can be, doing justice to those people who thought they were in for an easy way to make money.
The book has lots of "developer side notes". Some are really bad, coming from developers completely oblivious for me: they teach only what is obvious, and sometimes repeat what the author has already taught. But then again, some are brilliant, coming from either random guys or very famous developing houses like: Infinity Ward, Ensemble Studios, Obsidian Entertainment, etc. This little side notes offer guidelines on what to avoid, pursue or do while creating or thinking a game.

What I disliked.

Game Development Essentials Second Edition teaches its topics viewing gaming mostly as business and not as art. This was very disappointing for me. It constantly talks about knowing your market, and creating a good game for them. They always try to teach you to see games as a product and not as a creation to deliver a message. For a person who loves all games (me) that try hard to be art, or at least, to get a message across, it was hard to come to terms with all this (gaming as art is what inspired me in the first place).

Moreover, when the author talks about the importance of storyline in some games, she really bashes linear storytelling, saying games are supposed to be non linear. It weird but she stresses that the best games have non linear storylines and she creates this feel on her text that linear stories are a crime. But I asked myself, what about: Halo? Half Life? Gears of War? Max Payne? Metal Gear? Grim Fandango? The Longest Journey? Resident Evil? Killzone? Resistance? Silent Hill? Most of my favorite games tell linear stories! I believe that creating a linear story is a better way to developing characters; very few games have offered non linear storylines without making characters of such game look generic. But what bugs me is this: she openly talks about how great the story for some these games is, but nearly in the same paragraph she bashes linear storytelling. I think the author should rewrite that whole chapter, explaining which storytelling methods work better with the different genres in games.

All in all this is a great book, and definitely the best intro to game development. While it has a share of short comings, most of the time you'll be entertained and impressed by the learning scenario that author has created. She is not exhausting, she never punishes the learner with tons of questions, and the technical stuff is kept to a minimum. If you are looking to get into the business, look no further, this book will do you great justice indeed.
24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Required Reading (literally) Dec 18 2004
By Alan Emrich - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I teach Survey of the Game Industry, Game Design & Game Play, and Project Management at the Art Institute of California: Orange County. Being a frugal person myself, I have not required my students purchase a textbook for any of my classes until now. Ms. Novak's book has become the single source of required reading for ALL 3 of my classes. Breezy, intelligent, and designed from the first sentence as an instructional tool, you will learn a great deal about the game industry from it. I could not possibly recommend this book any higher than to commit my classes to it.
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Covers just about everything Oct. 4 2004
By Milan Petrovich - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book is as good an introduction to the game development process as I have come across. Incredibly current, peppered with wonderful interviews and comments from major professionals in the field. I especially like the CD-ROM which includes a wealth of demos and development tools.
13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Introductory Text Sept. 17 2005
By Game Designer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I'm a professional game designer with 7 years experience and found Ms. Novak's book to be a great introduction to the process of game development. It is well-organized and covers a wealth of relevant topics. The lucid writing and full color screenshots make it easy to read.

Unlike many other introductory books, Ms. Novak's text does not mislead the reader into thinking that becoming a game developer is an easy path, where a great idea and good pitch can allow you to create your dream game. It is a responsible and accessible text that anyone interested in game development would find helpful and insightful. Obviously, as an introductory text, its content is not particularly useful to industry professionals, though I found the profiles and the section on history to be enjoyable.

I don't understand Mark Baldwin's objection to the profiles, because I feel that they provide insight to the industry that is immensely valuable to those new to the field. Ranging from industry greats, such as Louis Castle and Richard Garriot, to current students, a wide variety of perspectives and thoughts are presented. As an aside, I can understand some of Mr. Baldwin's comments from an academic perspective, but from a practical point of view, I must disagree with his harsh appraisal.

I would recommend Ms. Novak's book to anyone who wants to learn the basics of the game development process.
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Solid Intro Textbook Feb. 29 2012
By Dave Coleman - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
This book creates a good foundation for learning about the modern game development process. Overall, I am happy with the book, and would recommend it to a beginner or as a quick read to fill in the gaps of an intermediate developer. I do have three complaints, however.

First off, it reads like a textbook. Take a few minutes to read the sample chapter. I thought the nature of that chapter forced the dryness of the reading, but the entire book reads this way. Be prepared for this, and structure your reading time accordingly.

Second, the author frequently includes quotes from various people in the field. I think this is excellent, and I wish more authors would do this. However, the author also includes a paragraphs with the person's credentials in-line with the text before the quote. The completely destroys the flow of the content, and severely distracts from the subject matter being presented.

Lastly, the frequent references to other books in the series makes this book feel like a marketing pamphlet. I understand this Introduction book is limited in scope, but a single page at the beginning of the book that references the other in-depth books would be more helpful. The in-line self-advertisements were irritating, and just make it harder to find them later if I actually want to dig up that book.

As I said previously, I would recommend this book. It's a solid intro to the topics at hand. If you go into it prepared for the above distractions, and with the understanding that this book is an overview and not a deep-dive, you should be able to maximize what you get from this book.

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