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Game Theory and the Social Contract: Playing Fair Hardcover – Mar 29 1994


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 388 pages
  • Publisher: The MIT Press (March 29 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0262023636
  • ISBN-13: 978-0262023634
  • Product Dimensions: 16 x 2.8 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 862 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #818,569 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

About the Author

Ken Binmore is Emeritus Professor at University College London. A Fellow of the Econometric Society and the British Academy, he is the author of Game Theory and the Social Contract, Volume 1: Playing Fair (1994) and Volume 2: Just Playing (1998), and the coeditor of Frontiers of Game Theory (1993), all three published by The MIT Press.

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Format: Hardcover
This is part one of Ken Binmore's exciting theory of the social contract taking up the discussion that took place in the 70ies after the publication of John Rawls' "Theory of Justice". While he sticks to the idea of a social contract reached through voluntary agreement in the Original Position, he also considers the utilitarian critique such as Harsanyi's. But Binmore does much more than that. He translates Rawls' metaphysical idea of a reflective equilibrium into a two-stage bargaining game with flesh and bones. He stresses the tautological character of game-theoretic tools which in this context becomes an advantage. By comparison of the ethical properties of allocations reached via competitive markets and those reached through bargaining in the original position he tries to identify a demarcation line for the decentralized aggregation of individual preferences. Binmore's book is going to be a challenge to any reader interested in the problem of explaining progress in human societies.
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Format: Hardcover
Many social scientists do not like the results and correct analysis of the game <i>Prisoners' Dilemma</i> and try to alter the situation by analyzing the game incorrectly. Binmore points out that what these folks want is a different model game. The problem is that these folks don't know enough game theory or utility theory.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Upgrading Rawls' "Theory of Justice" March 1 2001
By Mag Harald W. Stieber - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is part one of Ken Binmore's exciting theory of the social contract taking up the discussion that took place in the 70ies after the publication of John Rawls' "Theory of Justice". While he sticks to the idea of a social contract reached through voluntary agreement in the Original Position, he also considers the utilitarian critique such as Harsanyi's. But Binmore does much more than that. He translates Rawls' metaphysical idea of a reflective equilibrium into a two-stage bargaining game with flesh and bones. He stresses the tautological character of game-theoretic tools which in this context becomes an advantage. By comparison of the ethical properties of allocations reached via competitive markets and those reached through bargaining in the original position he tries to identify a demarcation line for the decentralized aggregation of individual preferences. Binmore's book is going to be a challenge to any reader interested in the problem of explaining progress in human societies.
5 of 28 people found the following review helpful
Classic Games like Prisoners' Dilemma applied to Social Sci July 9 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Many social scientists do not like the results and correct analysis of the game <i>Prisoners' Dilemma</i> and try to alter the situation by analyzing the game incorrectly. Binmore points out that what these folks want is a different model game. The problem is that these folks don't know enough game theory or utility theory.


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