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Gattaca (Sous-titres français)


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Product Details

  • Actors: Ethan Hawke, Uma Thurman, Jude Law, Gore Vidal, Xander Berkeley
  • Directors: Andrew Niccol
  • Writers: Andrew Niccol
  • Producers: Danny DeVito, Gail Lyon, Georgia Kacandes, Joshua Levinson, Michael Shamberg
  • Format: Anamorphic, Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, DTS Surround Sound, DVD-Video, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French, Portuguese, Georgian, Chinese, Thai
  • Subtitles for the Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Canadian Home Video Rating : Parental Guidance (PG)
  • Studio: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
  • Release Date: Dec 7 2004
  • Run Time: 106 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (285 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005R23Z
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #108,029 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

Product Description

The Superbit titles utilize a special high bit rate digital encoding process which optimizes video quality while offering a choice of both DTS and Dolby Digital 5.1 audio. These titles have been produced by a team of Sony Pictures Digital Studios video, sound and mastering engineers and comes housed in a special package complete with a 4 page booklet that contains technical information on the Superbit process. By reallocating space on the disc normally used for value-added content, Superbit DVDs can be encoded at double their normal bit rate while maintaining full compatibility with the DVD video format.

Amazon.ca

Confidently conceived and brilliantly executed, Gattaca had a somewhat low profile release in 1997, but audiences and critics hailed the film's originality. It's since been recognized as one of the most intelligent science fiction films of the 1990s. Writer-director Andrew Niccol, the talented New Zealander who also wrote the acclaimed Jim Carrey vehicle The Truman Show, depicts a near-future society in which one's personal and professional destiny is determined by one's genes. In this society, "Valids" (genetically engineered) qualify for positions at prestigious corporations, such as Gattaca, which grooms its most qualified employees for space exploration. "In-Valids" (naturally born), such as the film's protagonist, Vincent (Ethan Hawke), are deemed genetically flawed and subsequently fated to low-level occupations in a genetically caste society. With the help of a disabled "Valid" (Jude Law), Vincent subverts his society's social and biological barriers to pursue his dream of space travel; any random mistake--and an ongoing murder investigation at Gattaca--could reveal his plot. Part thriller, part futuristic drama and cautionary tale, Gattaca establishes its social structure so convincingly that the entire scenario is chillingly believable. With Uma Thurman as the woman who loves Vincent and identifies with his struggle, Gattaca is both stylish and smart, while Jude Law's performance lends the film a note of tragic and heartfelt humanity. In addition to a superb widescreen transfer, the DVD edition of Gattaca includes several deleted scenes (and one humorous outtake), which further establish the story's social context and provide additional insight into the scientific and ethical issues explored in this extraordinary film. --Jeff Shannon --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Joshua Koppel on June 24 2004
Format: DVD
Gattaca paints a future where the haves are genetically designed and the have-nots are genetically inferior with no hope of advancement. But one young man has a dream. He wants to get into space. To do this he works out and studies as hard as he is able. But all of the hard work does no good. Then he finds a way.
Occasionally one of the haves has an accident. Then it is possible to assume that person's identity armed with genetic traces, blood and urine samples and some creative surgery. Thus armed he is able to enter Gattaca (the organization responsible for space flight) where he wins a position on the mission to Titan. But there is a hitch; a murder. During the investigative sweep one of his eyelashes is found and the search begins in earnest.
Most of the rest of the movie is involved with trying to maintain identity long enough to manage take off. Complicating matters are a Columbo-style detective (Alan Arkin), a love interest (Uma Thurman) and his brother from his old life. In the end it comes down to a simple idea. Many of the haves know a have-not (be it a child, sibling or whatever) who they have had to abandon and our hero represents the one ray of hope that these people can have. So just as he is discovered, the discoverers each have a reason to not turn him in and he begins the mission to Titan.
Gattaca, with its heavy detective cat-and-mouse, could be the successor to Alfred Bester's THE DEMOLISHED MAN. This was a very well made film with a good story, characters, acting and pacing. There were excellent performances from many of the cast including author Gore Vidal. If you like your films with a bit of thought then this is one you should look out for.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Michael R Gates on July 1 2004
Format: DVD
1997's science-fiction drama GATTACA offers an intelligent look into the possible future of applied DNA science, a future where potential parents are given the ability to determine the genetic characteristics and thereby create a society of near-perfect super-humans. As one might deduce, this means that individuals born the "natural way"--such folk are referred to as "In-Valids"--are deemed inferior and prejudicially relegated to the lower rungs of the social ladder. In other words, In-Valids are considered mere mortals in this high-tech, genetically engineered world, and as such, education and opportunity are socially beyond their reach.
The film's plot revolves around Vincent Freeman (Ethan Hawke), an In-Valid who works as a janitor at an aerospace firm named Gattaca Corporation. But in spite of society's view of him, Vincent has dreams of someday going into space himself, and his intelligence and all-consuming drive to find a way to transcend societally imposed barriers leads him into an alliance with a black-marketeer (Tony Shalhoub) and a genetically "superior" young man (Jude Law) who wants to sell his own identity. Soon Vincent is engaged in a scheme to secure employment as an engineer at Gattaca and thereby realize his goals and dreams. But once he's finally on the other side of the fence, how long can he sustain such subterfuge in a society where an individual's genetic identity is constantly monitored and even a lost eyelash can provide authorities with enough genetic material to expose a fraud?
GATTACA examines the nature of personal identity, personal destiny, and the idea that an individual can become more than the sum of his parts.
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Format: DVD
To understand Gattaca, it helps to know a little history.

About a century ago, progressives took up what the New York Times in 1912 called the "wonderful new science" of eugenics. Because of improvements in medicine and public health, eugenists said, the "unfit" were having more children than the "fit." Their solution included both positive eugenics--encouraging the "fit" to have more children, and negative eugenics--preventing the "unfit" from having children.

Forced sterilization laws in some 37 states were their greatest achievement, with California being the most zealous in applying its law. But legislation in more conservative states, particularly in the South, was blocked by claims that forced sterilization was unconstitutional. That barrier was shoved aside in a 1927 Supreme Court decision, Buck v. Bell, which regarded forced sterilization laws as no different from laws requiring vaccination. Regard some children as a blight on society, and sterilization serves the same disease-eliminating function as vaccination.

The feminists of that day had no problem with negative eugenics. They believed that the birthrate of the "unfit" should be lowered by any means possible. Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a prominent feminist sociologist, made eugenics a key feature in her 1915 feminist utopia, Herland. What they objected to was "forced motherhood," meaning social pressures on women like themselves to abandon professional careers for children.

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger took up their cause. She was vehemently opposed to positive eugenics, but zealously championed negative eugenics. Most of those regarded as "unfit" were recent immigrants from Southern Europe (Catholic) and Eastern Europe (Jewish).
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