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Geopolitical Exotica: Tibet in Western Imagination Paperback – Jan 11 2008

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Univ Of Minnesota Press (Jan. 11 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0816647666
  • ISBN-13: 978-0816647668
  • Product Dimensions: 14.9 x 1.3 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 272 g
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,679,164 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Tibet as an Integral Entity, Rather Than as Seen Through a Western Lens March 26 2013
By Lou Thomas - Published on
Format: Paperback
The language of International Relations (IR) portrays Tibet as it affects the geopolitical goals of the large nations that anchor that field. In the process, IR minimizes and distorts the internal life and cultural content of Tibetan life.

This book represents a deconstruction of that process of distortion, as well as an examination of its motives, and a comparison of its perceptions with the author's own understanding of the realities of Tibetan internal life.