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German Idioms (Barron's Foreign Language Guides) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
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German Idioms Paperback – Apr 1 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Barron's Educational Series; 2 edition (April 1 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0764143832
  • ISBN-13: 978-0764143830
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 9.5 x 15.2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 159 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #356,537 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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By Emberek on April 25 2002
Format: Paperback
Arranged alphabetically by relevant word, this book contains some interesting idioms. Some of the idioms have a historical or cultural basis, but this isn't explained, so the curious student would have to follow up in a heavier and more expensive reference work--for example the big "Wahrig" German-to-German unilingual dictionary. For example, "German Idioms" lists "nach Adam Riese" 'according to Adam Riese' as an idiom meaning "exactly" (i.e., as when you're confident you've added a column of figures correctly), but doesn't say who A.R. was; the big Wahrig does this, however briefly. The same goes for "nullachtfuenfzehn" (meaning "no great shakes," Wahrig explains it comes from the standard dimensions of an ordinary German apartment). However, "Lieschen Mueller" is in the idioms book but not in Wahrig. So, I'd say the idioms book is good as a scholarly provocation but not as a scholarly fulfillment; but for that reason alone it's good value for the money and should be amusing for the advanced student of German.
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By A Customer on March 29 2000
Format: Paperback
I am a high school German teacher. In Henry Strutz's German Idioms I found a wonderful reference book that has provided me as well as my students with the appropriate expressions in German in many subject areas. The 2000 idioms cover a wide range of subjects including the expression that Germans hold their thubms for luck: "den Daumen druecken"- while we cross our fingers. If you are looking for a book that will help you grasp a general knowledge of German, this is not the book for you. The reader with a basic knowledge of German will be able to use the English and German indexes in the back to look up key words to find idioms on specific topics. Sometimes its difficult to know what keyword to look up in order to find an idiom on a specific subject. This is a better book for those who are interested in finding the English equivalents of German idioms, not the other way around. There are many funny idioms that have made learning new vocabulary for my students as well as myself much more enjoyable. The book is definately worth the money.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 16 reviews
32 of 34 people found the following review helpful
When I just can't find the words.... March 29 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I am a high school German teacher. In Henry Strutz's German Idioms I found a wonderful reference book that has provided me as well as my students with the appropriate expressions in German in many subject areas. The 2000 idioms cover a wide range of subjects including the expression that Germans hold their thubms for luck: "den Daumen druecken"- while we cross our fingers. If you are looking for a book that will help you grasp a general knowledge of German, this is not the book for you. The reader with a basic knowledge of German will be able to use the English and German indexes in the back to look up key words to find idioms on specific topics. Sometimes its difficult to know what keyword to look up in order to find an idiom on a specific subject. This is a better book for those who are interested in finding the English equivalents of German idioms, not the other way around. There are many funny idioms that have made learning new vocabulary for my students as well as myself much more enjoyable. The book is definately worth the money.
25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
Contains some nice bits April 25 2002
By Emberek - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Arranged alphabetically by relevant word, this book contains some interesting idioms. Some of the idioms have a historical or cultural basis, but this isn't explained, so the curious student would have to follow up in a heavier and more expensive reference work--for example the big "Wahrig" German-to-German unilingual dictionary. For example, "German Idioms" lists "nach Adam Riese" 'according to Adam Riese' as an idiom meaning "exactly" (i.e., as when you're confident you've added a column of figures correctly), but doesn't say who A.R. was; the big Wahrig does this, however briefly. The same goes for "nullachtfuenfzehn" (meaning "no great shakes," Wahrig explains it comes from the standard dimensions of an ordinary German apartment). However, "Lieschen Mueller" is in the idioms book but not in Wahrig. So, I'd say the idioms book is good as a scholarly provocation but not as a scholarly fulfillment; but for that reason alone it's good value for the money and should be amusing for the advanced student of German.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Idioms in one place Oct. 13 2008
By Clement E. Goergen - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Since German is a very idiomatic language, such a book as "German Idioms" is an extremely useful tool. It makes it much easier to find any idiomatic use of a particular word along with examples.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A lot of fun, but printed is better than Kindle edition March 20 2012
By MoreTech - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For people studying German and looking to learn more German idioms, this is an inexpensive and fun book to browse. I bought the Kindle edition, and it looks fine there, but this sort of book is not "a long read" -- you typically don't read it from first page to last, which is what the Kindle was designed for. Instead, you typically browse through it, skipping chunks of pages to find a random new expression, or you check the index for a keyword. The Kindle edition of this book's index is not set up to link directly to the target page, so it is slow and awkward to use the book that way.

But I like the book, so I'm buying the paper edition from Amazon, and I'll skip other similar reference books in the Kindle library.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
No One Says That Feb. 7 2013
By Levi Antrim - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Another example of Barrons missing the mark. The idioms in this book are seldom if ever used in the circles in which I run in Germany. It may only be my experience, but for the most part there is little to no use for the phrases in this book. I would also like to see them organized in a contextual way, but I have yet to find a book that is organized like that.


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