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Getting to Maybe: How the World Is Changed Hardcover – Sep 5 2006


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Random House Canada (Sept. 5 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679314431
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679314431
  • Product Dimensions: 23.6 x 18.7 x 2.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 567 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #261,360 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Getting to Maybe addresses making big, significant change actually happen. It is thoughtful, insightful, sobering and inspirational. The ideas articulated are new and practical. Anyone from the business, government or not-for-profit world who wants to understand change better, and change the way things are, should read this book.”
—Courtney Pratt, chairman of Stelco


From the Trade Paperback edition.

About the Author

Frances Westley has published widely in the areas of strategic change and visionary leadership, and led the Dupont Canada—fostered think-tank on social innovation, based at McGill University’s Desautel Faculty of Management, where many of the ideas for this book were developed.

Brenda Zimmerman, a professor at the Schulich School of Business at York University, has been studying and writing about how complexity theory applies to organizations for twenty years.

Michael Quinn Patton is an independent organizational development consultant and has written five major books on the art and science of program evaluation.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jerrod Bitango on Aug. 19 2008
Format: Paperback
You cannot read this book without marking up the margins of each page with your own creative ideas that springboard from the authors insights. This book draws the reader into a whole new paradigm of social innovation and organizational leadership.

It creates a healthy dissatisfaction in the reader which compels you to rethink your current values, strategies and approaches and think creatively about your organization. This book is strong affirmation for those individuals and organizations who believe that there can & should be a more "natural" and "organic" way of conducting business and service than we are currently investing.

Validing thinking, creativity, the power of self-organization, and the hope that motivates and captivates all social entrepreneurs are common themes throughout this book. A difficult read for linear and pragmatic thinkers but one that creates a vibrant balance between purpose and praxis. Worth every penny!
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Format: Paperback
I love the way this book challenges my thinking, and helps me move beyond my strategic processes to make a difference in the real and complex world. Everyone leading a nonprofit or government organization, whether board or staff, should read this book; learn to identify complex issues, and gain the tools and mindset to truly cope with that complexity. The results might amaze us!
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By Punksual on April 10 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I seriously have run out of things to write on my product reviews. This book honestly is a great book and I would recommend anyone to read it for ideas and inspiration to becoming or getting support as a social innovator.

Packaged well and arrived in great time. Go Amazon
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Format: Paperback
An extraordinary book. The authors' research, covering a diverse array of social innovation cases from the Boston Miracle to the Planned Lifetime Advocacy Network, teases out some crucial common threads. And interestingly enough for the Web 2.0 crowd, a lot of them run close and parallel to the world of the social web.

What sets this book apart from similar works is its seamless connection between a high-level examination of how chaos theory applies to social change, and practical, hands-on advice to would-be innovators and those who want to support them. It's that rare work that succeeds both in inspiring the reader, and providing a solid framework of theory and evidence to ground that inspiration in the real world.
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By Vincent on Jan. 12 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great
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