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Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In Paperback – Dec 2 1991

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; Revised edition (Dec 2 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140157352
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140157352
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 1.6 x 20.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 181 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (82 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #52,932 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

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We're constantly negotiating in our lives, whether it's convincing the kids to do their homework or settling million-dollar lawsuits. For those who need help winning these battles, Roger Fisher has developed a simple and straightforward five-step system for how to behave in negotiations. Narrated soothingly by NPR announcer Bob Edwards, Fisher adds the meaty portions of the material with a sense of playfulness. The blend of voices makes this tape easy to listen to, especially the real-life negotiating scenarios, in which negotiating examples are given. This is a must-have tape for every businessperson's car. (Running time: one hour, one cassette) --Sharon Griggins --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.


"This is by far the best thing I've ever read about negotiation. It is equally relevant for the individual who would like to keep his friends, property, and income and the statesman who would like to keep the peace." -- John Kenneth Galbraith
--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Like it or not, you are a negotiator. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By M. Nelsen on June 30 2004
Format: Paperback
I must confess I ordered and read this book because my new boss recommended it. Well, now that we have unpacked all the boxes from our move to take this job - I find we have about 5 copies of this book. This book is GREAT! This is not a new book but has been read by millions of people and is now a classic. The first edition came out in 1981 and the second edition 10 years later. The newest edition benefits from many updates and has an additional chapter (#10) with common questions (and answers) that people have commonly asked about Getting to Yes. This new chapter really helps the reader to understand the method better - in fact I can't imagine the book without it. One of the best things that authors Fisher, Ury and Patton do in this popular book do is give the reader a practical framework for developing better relationships that lead to better outcomes in life and work. The ideas are helpful in getting along with family as well as in the workplace. In many cases their methods will sound like things you already knew and have practiced in some of the more successful moments in your life. However, the book puts it all in perspective and gives you the complete picture to know why it works better when you focus on helping the other person get what they want so you can, too. After reading Getting to Yes you will be more prepared to negotiate more effectively in every type of situation. This book helped me decide I like the new boss, too!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Bryon Krug on Jan. 8 2004
Format: Paperback
It's amazing to me that this book was written over twenty years ago, but is still so relevant. Negotiation is a passion of mine, and I have read this book multiple times because the ideas presented in it are the basis for almost any book that has been written on negotiation since its publication. Plus, it is a quick read that almost anyone can understand.
This book revolutionized negotiation with its claim that you would be better off if the person that you were negotiating with also read this book. Rather than focusing on tricks and ways to manipulate the other side, it shows you how to set up a cooperative, win-win negotiation.
Such terms as win-win negotiation, cooperative problem solving, BATNA (best alternative to a negotiated agreement), and negotiation jujitsu might sound trite because they are used so frequently in other negotiation texts. However, I'm willing to look past that since these terms originated here.
In multiple negotiations--big and small--I have used the process outlined in this book (1. "separate the people from the problem", 2. "focus on interests, not positions", 3. "invent options for mutual gain", 4. "insist on using objective criteria") to produce successful results.
Your ability to negotiate affects so many parts of your life (from how much money you make to how you resolve conflicts with your spouse) that it is worth investing in this book and in becoming a better negotiator.
While (because the book is a tad idealistic) I do not recommend making this the only book that you read on negotiation, I highly recommend it as one of the books to read. I'd also recommend checking out "Getting Past No" by Bill Ury, which is the follow-on to this and discusses how to handle situations in which the other side doesn't want to cooperate.
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Format: Paperback
Getting to the Yes was a very good read, to say the least. The authors offer straight to the point, no nonsense advice on how negotiate more effectively. When one talks about negotiation, what comes to your mind? If you are buy something - do you make a superficially low offer, and then slowly add more and more until it reached the price you were originally ready to pay? If you are selling - do you start off by asking for an exceedingly high price, and then, through negotiation, slowly cut the price down to to show your goodwill? Have you ever wondered if you were selling too cheap / buying too expensive? Do you believe that negotiation is all about two parties stating their positions, and then trying to meet each other somewhere in the middle?

If you answered yes to one of those questions, this book is for you. Chances are, if you do this while negotiating, others also know the trick, and therefore, there is no clear advantage for either side, and the result may be mediocre for both at best. The author bring up an example of two children fighting for an orange. At the end, the orange is cut in half and each child gets half - only to realize that one child only wanted the peel for baking, and the other child only wanted the meat.

What the authors propose is a "principled" approach to negotiation, that is, the negotiators should always find out what the other party wants at their core (the principle behind their offer/demands) - because offers and proposals are merely expressions of deeper desires. In the example above, wanting the orange was merely a representation of what each child wanted, and had it been made clear, both would have gained much more.
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Format: Paperback
When it comes to negotiation, people are often confronted with though bargaining that destroys relationships. Getting to Yes offers people a new way of looking at negotiation and enables negotiators to reach a mutual profitable agreement without hard feelings.

The Harvard Negotiation Project, which this book is based on, came to understand basic principles that should guide every dispute. Thus, it is important to focus on the issue at hand, not the people involved in it or the position one defends. Do not hesitate to stay creative and develop new solutions to the problem. Often, both parties don't realize all opportunities available and "leave money on the table", in the authors' words. Finally, use objective criteria to decide on a solution. The authors also explain how to negotiate with people in a stronger position than you are.

The authors' style is simple and easy to understand. Nicely divided into subsections, every chapter covers a particular principle. Additional questions asked following the first edition were annexed at the end of the original text in this version.

Overall, this book offers nothing new, but reminds the reader of techniques that can ease any negotiation.
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