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Ghost Stories of the Rocky Mountains Paperback – Jun 13 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 216 pages
  • Publisher: Lone Pine Publishing (June 13 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1894877217
  • ISBN-13: 978-1894877213
  • Product Dimensions: 21 x 13.6 x 1.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 181 g
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #249,628 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Amazon.com: 2 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
A Fascinating Collection of Ghost Tales Aug. 29 2009
By Martha Jette - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The geological grandness of the Rocky Mountains are in themselves, breathtaking but what is even more captivating are the countless legends and paranormal stories that live on there - many dating back to the 1800's when the word was that there was "gold in them thar hills."

The mountains themselves, wind their way from Colorado in the United States to Alberta, Canada and into Alaska - a huge area with many tales of men who set out from the east for gold and never returned - leaving just their skeletal remains behind. Others managed to settle in the area and establish the earliest towns.

One of those was Garnet, Montana, which today is known as a `ghost town' that truly has its own ghosts - those of miners whose souls remain to this day. Apparently, tourists say if you listen, you can hear the sounds of horses' hooves, wagon wheels and even a blacksmith pounding horseshoes during the day. Author Barbara Smith says that at night, one might hear the sound of a honky-tonk piano playing or the knocking of a phantom spirit at the door.

There were also a number of forts established along the Rocky Mountain range, including one in Cheyenne, Wyoming. Though now a bustling city, Cheyenne kept one reminder of its colorful past - a stone house on Park Street that is believe to be haunted by the ghost of a young cavalry officer dubbed `Luther.' According to the author, the family now residing in the home lives peacefully with this spirit, who has been know to show himself in full form.

Ghost Stories of the Rocky Mountains Volume II contains a wide variety of stories, not just about the mining towns and their specters, but also of haunted houses, highways and byways, haunted inns and more. If you love intriguing ghost stories and have an opportunity to pick up this book, you won't be disappointed.

Other books by Barbara Smith include Ghost Stories of the Rocky Mountains, Haunted Theaters and Ghost Stories of the Sea.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Badly Researched July 8 2014
By konacoffee - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I received this book and immediately went to the tale about "Col" Graham and the mines in Rosita. Holy Moley was it wrong! Graham was a former Army Brevet Major who was court martialed. Never made full Colonel, and was always referred to as Major after his arrival in Colorado. The story in this book contains an unsourced newspaper blurb about his character. If the author HAD any source it would not have read "Col." The death of Graham was wrong also. He made his way into town one morning when he was gunned down. Never hid in a building first. Perhaps the author is mixing up an earlier incident where Graham hid from the law in a mountain cabin and was shot upon exiting.
Rosita isn't even a ghost town anymore, a few newer bldgs at an intersection.
As with most ghost story books, there is no sourcing, nothing backing up wild claims, a silly but colorful cover, and really bad research. As incorrect as this one tale is I cannot believe anything else in the book isn't inaccurate as well. Seriously, you quote an article and get the subject's name/rank wrong?!
Judging by the one other review, specifically the mention of the author's other books, I'm guessing it was from a friend or relative.
This book only suitable for easily frightened teenagers.
Historians...be very afraid!


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